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What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

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  • [Question] What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

    Discuss
    "Walt Disney World may have more than Disneyland, but Disneyland has quality, and quality triumphs over quantity" -DL_CRAZE
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  • #2
    Re: What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

    I'd venture to say Big Thunder Mountain and Pinocchio's Daring Journey. Both were "after Walt" concepts (Space Mountain was an idea during Walt's life), overseen by second generation imagineers (Tony Baxter was lead I believe) who had worked for the company during Walt's time in some capacity and under original designers.
    when the spooks have a midnight jamboree....

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    • #3
      Re: What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

      I agree, except I would say BTMRR (because it was the first Walt ride to be destroyed and replaced after his death) and the entire 1983 FL refurb because it was the first major overhaul in the park without his input.
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      • #4
        Re: What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

        I would have to say Pirates of the Caribbean and The Haunted Mansion. Both were conceived and worked on by Walt, but completed after his death. Thus the rides were the product of two eras, the Walt era and the Post-Walt era.
        "Greetings, Starfighter! You have been recruited by the Star League to defend the Frontier against Xur and the Ko-Dan Armada."

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        • #5
          Re: What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

          The above would be my answer too. Pirates and Haunted Mansion are both Walt-era attractions that have survived, with some gilding-the-lily changes, but are largely still original. Big Thunder Mountain Railroad was a failure of park layout and design principles, reducing a 7-acre Walt attraction to a 2-acre Knott's attraction, and Star Tours set a dangerous precedent of importing non-Disney properties into a Disney park, evicting another great Walt-era attraction in the process. The last "Walt attraction" was Space Mountain, and ever since then it has been a long, slow, steady decline in originality - because the big decisions are now made by MBAs and bean-counters instead of people with vision and imagination.

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          • #6
            Re: What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

            I'd like to say Splash Mountain is one even though it's a late 80s/early 90s attraction. For some reason it always felt like the ride is older than that but maybe that is nostalgia talking. It is a ride that uses Walt era characters with advance animatronics.

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            • #7
              Re: What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

              Originally posted by RegionsBeyond View Post
              I'd venture to say Big Thunder Mountain and Pinocchio's Daring Journey. Both were "after Walt" concepts (Space Mountain was an idea during Walt's life), overseen by second generation imagineers (Tony Baxter was lead I believe) who had worked for the company during Walt's time in some capacity and under original designers.
              I don't recall Walt ever envisioning a Pinocchio ride.
              "Walt Disney World may have more than Disneyland, but Disneyland has quality, and quality triumphs over quantity" -DL_CRAZE
              __________________________________________________________

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              • #8
                Re: What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

                I agree with Thunder Mountain. It was opened around Disneyland's 25th Anniversary, so in time, it sits in the middle of the lifespan (so to speak). I also vote for Pirates of the Carribean. This was the last attraction in which Disney had a hand in its planning. It's popular to this day.

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                • #9
                  Re: What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

                  Hang on to your hats and glasses.
                  Marquis d'Bod of the RCMC... always and forever

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                  • #10
                    Re: What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

                    Originally posted by Bob Weaver View Post
                    The above would be my answer too. Pirates and Haunted Mansion are both Walt-era attractions that have survived, with some gilding-the-lily changes, but are largely still original. Big Thunder Mountain Railroad was a failure of park layout and design principles, reducing a 7-acre Walt attraction to a 2-acre Knott's attraction, and Star Tours set a dangerous precedent of importing non-Disney properties into a Disney park, evicting another great Walt-era attraction in the process. The last "Walt attraction" was Space Mountain, and ever since then it has been a long, slow, steady decline in originality - because the big decisions are now made by MBAs and bean-counters instead of people with vision and imagination.
                    Bingo.
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                    • #11
                      Re: What two attractions bridged the gap between Golden Age and New Age?

                      Originally posted by calsig31 View Post
                      I would have to say Pirates of the Caribbean and The Haunted Mansion. Both were conceived and worked on by Walt, but completed after his death. Thus the rides were the product of two eras, the Walt era and the Post-Walt era.
                      THIS!

                      Originally posted by Bob Weaver View Post
                      The above would be my answer too. Pirates and Haunted Mansion are both Walt-era attractions that have survived, with some gilding-the-lily changes, but are largely still original. Big Thunder Mountain Railroad was a failure of park layout and design principles, reducing a 7-acre Walt attraction to a 2-acre Knott's attraction, and Star Tours set a dangerous precedent of importing non-Disney properties into a Disney park, evicting another great Walt-era attraction in the process. The last "Walt attraction" was Space Mountain, and ever since then it has been a long, slow, steady decline in originality - because the big decisions are now made by MBAs and bean-counters instead of people with vision and imagination.
                      Exactly!!
                      Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
                      Bingo.
                      +1
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