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  • [Chat] The Mysteries of Casting

    One of the posts in the strike thread talked about how Casting gives the low status jobs (Foods, ODV, and Hotels were mentioned) to the most bright-eyed, optimistic kids who'll be so excited to work at DL that they won't care they're doing the jobs nobody else wants.

    This got me to thinking. If that's so, who gets the prestigious jobs? If the most enthusiastic people get the lousy roles, what does it take to be in, say, Attractions or Guest Relations?

    On a broader scale, what decides who gets what? What makes an interviewer think, "Hmm, this girl should be in Stores" or "Ugh, send this guy to Custodial?"
    Disneyland Historic Preservation Society
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  • #2
    Re: The Mysteries of Casting

    i know when i went though interviewing, i told them flat out i can not work with chemicals or in the sun for hours on end, so it kept me out of odv and custodial.

    idk how they determine, but they do. I think it mainly has to do with what position needs to be filled the most.

    btw, i was hired but never got to move to so cal, so according to Disney, when i want a job, i have one.

    ANYONE WANT A ROOMIE?!?!?!?!?

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    • #3
      Re: The Mysteries of Casting

      Originally posted by Broadway Guru View Post
      One of the posts in the strike thread talked about how Casting gives the low status jobs (Foods, ODV, and Hotels were mentioned) to the most bright-eyed, optimistic kids who'll be so excited to work at DL that they won't care they're doing the jobs nobody else wants.
      I don't think this is true at all. I think it's just a matter of there always being more open roles in the less desirable positions, so they are always trying to fill them.

      As for positions like Attractions and Guest Relations - they are completely dependent on how many open spots there there. A lot of people pick attractions, and if I am correct, several of the attractions departments in the park are currently experiencing a hiring freeze. People in those departments tend to stay and enjoy what they do, so it's harder to get into.

      For a long time Guest Relations was entirely composed of Cast Members who were transferring from other areas (mostly attractions) where they already had some experience being in the park and working with guests. If an outstanding person comes into casting with the customer service experience, I'm sure that casting could make the exception and place them directly into Guest Relations (but while I've heard of this happening before, it is in fact extremely rare).

      The Casting CMs basically determine where you go based on your attitude, your experience, and what roles are open. No real mystery to it. If you seem like a friendly person and someone who feels comfortable in front of people and interacting with people, and you REALLY want attractions and there's a spot open, that's what you will get.

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      • #4
        Re: The Mysteries of Casting

        Casting encourages people into whatever department they need to fill that day, IMHO.

        Unusually and exceedingly peculiar and altogether quite impossible to describe...


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        • #5
          Re: The Mysteries of Casting

          Casting has changed so much since I was hired in that I am not entirely sure of the process. I talked with a couple old friends and they basically broke it down this way. When an individual walks through the door and aces the electronic thingy (which actually green lights the actual interviews) then it is up to the individual to make their intentions heard. The interviewer will take the applicants requests into consideration, but the interviewer also has a cutsheet of sorts which tells them what is open, what is expected to be open, and what is full. They can not force an individual in a certain field per say... but they can only offer what is currently available. For example a few years back when the Foods crisis happened... 1/3 of everyone getting a job was in Foods... this caused other problems that I had noted before... but that is basically how the system works.

          In my case I stated from the beginning that I really wanted Jungle. My interviewers both felt I would be a good match but Jungle was not open at the time. So the offer came up as being Indy with the possibility of cross-training to Jungle once I had completed probation and when a spot was available. That is the route I took. They also had openings in other areas... but Indy had a spot and that is where I wanted to be.

          As I said the above may be outdated. It has been a while since I, or my friends, have worked for Disney (last one left TDA a little over a year ago)... but I am pretty sure it hasn't changed that much.
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          • #6
            Re: The Mysteries of Casting

            I had a choice of attractions and asked for ODV, simply because I knew a bunch of people that worked there already and I was told ODV was the funnest job, and they were right, ODV was awesome fun, and two of my other friends worked Star Tours, and POTC, they got bored very fast of the same ol thing everyday. So long story short ODV was not low status when I worked there, It was super fun, and provided a great amount of freedom, I was beverage stock control and I got to walk around with a radio and check on carts, and I also got to hit on chicks all day long, It was fantastic.
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            • #7
              Re: The Mysteries of Casting

              Originally posted by DeathDealer View Post
              I had a choice of attractions and asked for ODV, simply because I knew a bunch of people that worked there already and I was told ODV was the funnest job, and they were right, ODV was awesome fun, and two of my other friends worked Star Tours, and POTC, they got bored very fast of the same ol thing everyday. So long story short ODV was not low status when I worked there, It was super fun, and provided a great amount of freedom, I was beverage stock control and I got to walk around with a radio and check on carts, and I also got to hit on chicks all day long, It was fantastic.
              I think every job, be it Disney or otherwise, boils down to the individual and if they can make it fun. If an individual is unable to enjoy their job then they either toil away or they move on. Love of a job is one thing that keeps people despite other factors including questionable pay.
              "Happiness is a Low Water Level"

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              "Creating magical memories and making Managers cry since 1955!"

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