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  • [Question] Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

    I used to regularly look for the upcoming special events at DisneyGallery.com , to find out about all the special event at DL. Sometime over a year ago, they did change the format to the site, and I stopped going there, after the Haunted Mansion Special events were sold out. Well, it was time to go back and see what's new, fortunately www.disneygallery.com still works as a link (although it's still in it's newer messier format.)

    Going throught the events, I was a little surprised at their announcement of the Current Exhibit in Main Street's Disney Gallery:

    Conjuring New Magic for Iconic Disneyland Attractions

    With Disneyland, Walt Disney was able to do things he'd never been able to do with one of his motion pictures: change it, mold it, shape it, improve it. "The way I see it, Disneyland will never be finished," he once said. "It's something we can keep developing and adding to. A motion picture is different. Once it's wrapped up and sent out for processing, we're through with it." Early examples of Walt molding and shaping Disneyland include adding a new land, New Orleans Square, in 1966; changing Tomorrowland not once, but twice (in 1959 with the addition of the Submarine Voyage and the Monorail, and again in 1967 with an entirely new Tomorrowland) and even altering and improving the already beloved Jungle Cruise to put in extra scenes and more humor. Walt Disney Imagineering has continued Walt's legacy, not only adding new lands, attractions and shows, but also creating new "magic" for existing attractions, surprising and delighting guests who think they may have seen it all at Disneyland.
    But Look a little close, especially at "changing Tomorrowland not once, but twice (in 1959 with the addition of the Submarine Voyage and the Monorail, and again in 1967 with an entirely new Tomorrowland)"

    Just how could they possibly forget the Disaster that was Tomorrowland '98? The only other time I recall DL "forgetting" to mention something, was in the DL 50 year anniversary book, which summarized all of DL attractions and events - conveniently "forgetting" LIGHT MAGIC.

    So is DL trying to erase Tomorrowerland '98 from their history? Or was this just a boo-boo? They really ought not to forget the history of the failure of TL'98, so they never repeat those mistakes.
    Critter Country's a mess ev'r since the Country Bears were kicked out. Ya can't cover pooh with honey and 'spect people ta like it.
    An Adventurers It's Time to Put the Spotlight Back on Bring Back the REAL Disney Gallery
    Life for Me! ~ ~ ~ Melvin, Buff, and Max!!! ~~~~ Dump the Dream Suite!
    Meese-ka Moose-ka Mice-Chatter!


  • #2
    Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

    I think because they were talking about Walt's contributions to the parks. Walt died in 1966, but I'm assuming he probably worked with Imagineers and everything, but just didn't see it completed in 1967. He obviously probably didn't plan TL'98, since that was 32 years after his death. I think they didn't mention TL'98 there because it just didn't fit in the discussion about Walt Disney's addition and creation of the park, but now that you point that out, I never really hear anything about TL'98 from Disney.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

      I think they are intentionally avoiding Tomorrowland 98. Notice how nearly nothing is left of it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

        Ah, thanks disney princess. HAHAHAHA, yeah, they wouldn't DARE credit Walt with "TL'98" hahahahaha!

        They do say that imagineering has "continued in Walt's legacy adding new lands, attractions, and shows . . . and creating new magic for existing attractions".

        They should have added "enhancing both attractions and lands with new Magic", after all, they did makeover Fantasyland quite nicely in the early 80's.
        Critter Country's a mess ev'r since the Country Bears were kicked out. Ya can't cover pooh with honey and 'spect people ta like it.
        An Adventurers It's Time to Put the Spotlight Back on Bring Back the REAL Disney Gallery
        Life for Me! ~ ~ ~ Melvin, Buff, and Max!!! ~~~~ Dump the Dream Suite!
        Meese-ka Moose-ka Mice-Chatter!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

          To the best of my knowledge (and I'm sure I'll be corrected here shortly) the last attraction to open that Walt had a personal involvement in was Space Mountain, which opened in WDW in 1975 and at Disneyland in 1977. Walt originated the idea in the early 1960s of a high-speed ride based on space travel. In my opinion Space Mountain is the last completely original attraction of Disneyland, not based on or derived from something else. Not coincidentally, I think of it as "Walt's last ride." (Some might come to the conclusion that when Walt died, originality also died.) Space Mountain was the final piece of the puzzle and brought Tomorrowland to fulfillment. The Tomorrowland of 1977 to 1985 was the best it ever got, though I did prefer the Carousel of Progress to America Sings, that's just a minor quibble. The demise of Tomorrowland began in 1985 with the closure of Adventure thru Inner Space, and the disastrous 1998 redesign of Tomorrowland was the final blow to a once-great area. It's no surprise if the company literature fails to mention the 1998 changes or gives them short shrift. Tomorrowland as it stands now would make a great movie set for a post-apocalyptic future world sci-fi flick but that's about it. Just my opinion of course.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

            Wow...I hadn't thought about it quite in those terms. There are no truly original attractions in modern-day Disneyland itself that were created less than forty years ago. That's...depressing, to say the very least. Movie-based attractions are great in moderation. In moderation.

            EDIT: I take it back! We got Innoventions! :botox:

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

              Originally posted by Bob Weaver View Post
              To the best of my knowledge (and I'm sure I'll be corrected here shortly) the last attraction to open that Walt had a personal involvement in was Space Mountain, which opened in WDW in 1975 and at Disneyland in 1977. Walt originated the idea in the early 1960s of a high-speed ride based on space travel. In my opinion Space Mountain is the last completely original attraction of Disneyland, not based on or derived from something else. Not coincidentally, I think of it as "Walt's last ride." (Some might come to the conclusion that when Walt died, originality also died.) Space Mountain was the final piece of the puzzle and brought Tomorrowland to fulfillment. The Tomorrowland of 1977 to 1985 was the best it ever got, though I did prefer the Carousel of Progress to America Sings, that's just a minor quibble. The demise of Tomorrowland began in 1985 with the closure of Adventure thru Inner Space, and the disastrous 1998 redesign of Tomorrowland was the final blow to a once-great area. It's no surprise if the company literature fails to mention the 1998 changes or gives them short shrift. Tomorrowland as it stands now would make a great movie set for a post-apocalyptic future world sci-fi flick but that's about it. Just my opinion of course.
              Great post, Bob.


              "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
              it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
              together with every variety of recreation and fun,
              designed to appeal to everyone."

              - Walt Disney

              "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
              - Michael Eisner

              "It's very symbiotic."
              - Bob Chapek

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                1970's new non movie based attractions

                Country Bear Jamboree (sadly gone)

                America Sings (sadly gone)

                Space Mountain (rebuilt and reopened in 2005)

                Big Thunder -

                Oh, Big Thunder would actually be that last non movie attraction at DL (although Walt wasn't involved with it )

                For DCA, I'd give that credit to Soarin', although GRRR and Screamin aren't based on movies, but then again, Screamin isn't a real disney attraction anyway.
                Critter Country's a mess ev'r since the Country Bears were kicked out. Ya can't cover pooh with honey and 'spect people ta like it.
                An Adventurers It's Time to Put the Spotlight Back on Bring Back the REAL Disney Gallery
                Life for Me! ~ ~ ~ Melvin, Buff, and Max!!! ~~~~ Dump the Dream Suite!
                Meese-ka Moose-ka Mice-Chatter!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                  Yeah, Big Thunder was the last.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                    To me, some aspects of Big Thunder Mountain Railroad are derived from some aspects of the Mine Train thru Nature's Wonderland (the Rainbow Ridge storefronts, the use of Dallas McKennon on the recorded narration as the ride starts, and the semi-tribute to Rainbow Caverns on the first lift) and it may have also been partially based on the "Thunder Mesa" concept which was designed by Marc Davis for Walt Disney World, but never built there, and which included as one of its features a runaway mine train ride. There is a "Thunder Mesa" in existence at Disneyland Paris, but from what I can tell it bears little resemblance to Marc Davis' plans. So I have a little difficulty thinking of Big Thunder Mountain Railroad as a 100% original attraction, but at least the concepts that led to it were all-Disney and not taken from other parks or from movies. Just my opinion, of course. I don't really know or claim to know any more.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                      Some later attractions that are/were not based on movies:

                      Mulholland Madness (not that I actually like it)
                      Tower of Terror (not brand-new, per-se, but not based on a movie)
                      Rocket Rods (was original, but had ill-fated technical flaws)

                      Attractions that are/were based on, or greatly influenced by movies, that were around when Walt Disney was around:

                      Virtually everything in Fantasyland
                      The Jungle Cruise (Based on or strongly inspired by movies)
                      Tom Sawyer's Island (OK, this was originally a book, but I'm sure there was also a movie by the time the island opened)
                      The original Submarine voyage (The original Nemo movie)
                      Adventure Through Inner Space (Don't tell me that the concept for this ride wasn't taken directly from 1966's Fantastic Voyage)

                      My intent is not to diminish any of these attractions, because I think that almost all of them are/were great. I just want to point out that those people who like to fault, or even outright dismiss, the more recent Disney attractions because they are based on movies, are overlooking just how much Disney attractions have always been based on movies and other popular media of the time.

                      One thing to consider is that, back when Disneyland was being built, there were few, if any, theme parks and definitely nothing like Disneyland, itself. At that time, Walt had a pretty easy time acquiring rights to copyrighted works and ideas for rides. However, nowadays, Disney has to be pretty careful not to 'steal' a concept for an attraction, from one of the far greater number of movies, TV shows, video games, comic books, etc. Basically, the waters of copyright violation litigation have gotten a LOT deeper since Disneyland became such a success, and Disney's pockets are a lot more attractive, too. So, Disney is safer, in a legal sense, basing attractions on intellectual property that they already own free and clear.

                      Of course, I still agree that it would still be really nice to have some cool, new attractions that are not directly tied to some pre-created character(s). As I'm sure others have already opined, I'd really like to see Disney introduce a new attraction with an original (basic) story line and original characters, let it be for a year or two and then fill in the story for us with a good movie based on that ride.
                      Dead Mice Tell No Tails!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                        I don't think anyone's trying to make a case for movie tie-ins being bad. It's balance we want, and when Disneyland itself (as opposed to the whole resort) currently lacks any original attractions less than 40 years old, balance is not what we're getting. And because it's been discussed over and over and over again, I'm not going to go into details, but there are very significant qualitative differences between the sorts of old school tie-ins you're talking about and the kind we see Disney producing now. It's true that the Jungle Cruise and FNSV are both inspired by movies, but they go about obtaining and displaying that inspiration in VERY different ways.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                          Originally posted by BiggestDisneyFan View Post
                          Attractions that are/were based on, or greatly influenced by movies, that were around when Walt Disney was around:

                          Virtually everything in Fantasyland
                          The Jungle Cruise (Based on or strongly inspired by movies)
                          Tom Sawyer's Island (OK, this was originally a book, but I'm sure there was also a movie by the time the island opened)
                          The original Submarine voyage (The original Nemo movie)
                          Adventure Through Inner Space (Don't tell me that the concept for this ride wasn't taken directly from 1966's Fantastic Voyage)
                          Not to nitpick, but in point of historical fact, Tom Sawyer Island was not based on a film. The Mark Twain book had long since entered public consciousness as American mythology: Tom, Huck, Becky and Injun Joe were and are symbols of childhood adventure and freedom -- along with Fort Wilderness, the treehouse, Castle Rock, Teeter Totter Rock, Merry Go Round Rock, the suspension and pontoon bridges, mysterious caves, unexplored paths through the forest, straw hats, bare feet, fishin' poles and the other icons of TSI.

                          The original Submarine Voyage thru Liquid Space was not based on 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, but inspired by the popularity of ocean exploration and nuclear submarines in the 50's, especially the much-ballyhooed 1958 voyage of the U.S.S. Nautilus beneath the North Pole ice cap.

                          Adventure thru Inner Space, created in collaboration with the chief scientist at Monsanto, was on the drawing boards before Raquel Welch ever put on that wet suit in Fantastic Voyage. It continued the Disney Studio's tradition of edutainment science films from the 50's, notably Ward Kimball's Man in Space trilogy.

                          The often-repeated argument that the Jungle Cruise was inspired by The African Queen falls apart when you view the film. Other than the concept of a tramp steamer as transport, there is no similarity between the film and the Disneyland attraction. The basis of the Jungle Cruise goes back to the romantic view of jungle exploration that was popularized during 19th century British colonialism -- itself rooted in Western myths of the "unexplored tropics" that were centuries older.


                          Originally posted by BiggestDisneyFan View Post
                          One thing to consider is that, back when Disneyland was being built, there were few, if any, theme parks and definitely nothing like Disneyland, itself. At that time, Walt had a pretty easy time acquiring rights to copyrighted works and ideas for rides.
                          Copyright laws existed then as now. But in fact Walt did not acquire rights to copyrighted works for Disneyland rides, nor did he need to. He tapped into America's collective mythology of its own past and its optimism for its future. Even Fantasyland was seen through an American lens, a take on European myths that informed many of his studio's films -- which themselves dealt in timeless themes of childhood, even if derived from literary works like Alice in Wonderland and Peter Pan.

                          - - -

                          In comparing film-derived Disneyland attractions in Walt's day and now, consider this: Alice in Wonderland tanked in the box office, yet Walt made the Alice dark ride and the Teacups, both of which have endured for over half a century. The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad was a minor 1949 anthology that was hardly remembered in 1955, yet the Toad dark ride has been popular since Disneyland opened. Pecos Bill, a segment from 1948's Melody Time, was even more obscure to 1955 audiences, but had the perfect mix of Western mythology and rollicking fun for the stage show at Sluefoot Sue's Golden Horseshoe Saloon.

                          In contrast, Davy Crockett was a monster hit in the mid-50's, a popular phenomenon like none before. Yet unlike Carsland, Walt built no Davy Crockett Land. Not even a Davy Crockett ride, other than the Mike Fink Keelboats. One store bore Davy's name. He showed up as a wax figure inside a small room in Ft. Wilderness. You could buy coonskin caps and other Crockett merchandise. But other than that, zip. No Davy Crockett parade. No Davy Crockett musical show at the Golden Horseshoe. No Davy Crockett walkaround characters. No Davy Crockett photo ops. No Davy Crockett character lunches with marked up prices.

                          When it came to the celebration of America that was at the heart of Disneyland, U.S.A., Walt went for what was timeless, not what was trendy.

                          And that is what renders comparisons between Walt Disney's Disneyland and Eisner & Iger's Disneyland effectively irrelevant.


                          Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 10-11-2009, 08:13 AM.
                          "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                          it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                          together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                          designed to appeal to everyone."

                          - Walt Disney

                          "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                          - Michael Eisner

                          "It's very symbiotic."
                          - Bob Chapek

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                            Originally posted by Aladdin View Post
                            1970's new non movie based attractions

                            Country Bear Jamboree (sadly gone)
                            For the record, Country Bears did have a movie, though it didn't exist until after the DL version closed.


                            Originally posted by BiggestDisneyFan View Post
                            Attractions that are/were based on, or greatly influenced by movies, that were around when Walt Disney was around:

                            Virtually everything in Fantasyland
                            The Jungle Cruise (Based on or strongly inspired by movies)
                            Tom Sawyer's Island (OK, this was originally a book, but I'm sure there was also a movie by the time the island opened)
                            The original Submarine voyage (The original Nemo movie)
                            Adventure Through Inner Space (Don't tell me that the concept for this ride wasn't taken directly from 1966's Fantastic Voyage)
                            Matterhorn was conceptualized while Walt was filming Third Man on the Mountain, does that count?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                              Adventure thru Inner Space took the guest through the micro-miniature world of molecules and atoms, using water/snow as the example. In Fantastic Voyage, people in a submarine are miniaturized and sent through the bloodstream of a diplomat. I don't really see the connection there except that people are miniaturized. But who knows, maybe that was on their minds. To me Adventure thru Inner Space seems like a ride that would have been at home at any of the World's Fairs in the 1950s and 1960s. It has more in connection with science films that public schools showed commonly back when I was in grade school and high school. But it is still one of my favorite Disneyland attractions ever, second only to Mine Train thru Nature's Wonderland.

                              By lack of originality I meant not only basing attractions on movies, but also the practice of taking rides from non-Disney parks and giving them a virtual coat of Disney paint and calling it a Disney attraction. Splash Mountain seems almost like a direct response to Knott's Calico Log Ride, Maliboomer is too much like similar rides in other parks, Orange Stinger is/was basically a ride you see at traveling carnivals, Grizzly River Rapids is very similar to rides like that at Sea World and Knott's, and even California Screamin' seems very much like something Magic Mountain would build. Of course Disney does them all better than the other parks; Splash Mountain is better than Calico Log Ride; but I kind of expect Disney to come out with things that nobody else has ever done before, things that are truly unique and original in concept and execution. They don't seem to do that as much as they did in the first 25 years of the park's history.
                              Last edited by Bob Weaver; 10-11-2009, 12:50 AM.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                                Great responses, Wiggins and Data.


                                BiggestDisneyFan, I see in your last paragraph that we actually agree, for the most part . But here goes anyway:

                                If there was a movie of Tom Sawyer, I'm pretty sure it wasn't Disney's. The attraction was based directly on the book.

                                There are no Bogart and Hepburn AA's on the Jungle Cruise. While African Queen is often mentioned as an inspiration, it seems like the main idea came from Walt's True-Life Adventure nature documentaries. That is, until it was refurbed by Marc Davis into the more humorous (and less movie based) attraction we know today.

                                The story, characters and even the mountain (called "The Citadel") from Third Man on the Mountain are absent from the Matterhorn (mentioned by dfan07). Their release/opening was "synergistic", as they both involved mountains, but little was done to link the two in the long term. The addition of the Abominable Snowman has only made them less related.

                                Originally posted by BiggestDisneyFan View Post
                                One thing to consider is that, back when Disneyland was being built, there were few, if any, theme parks and definitely nothing like Disneyland, itself. At that time, Walt had a pretty easy time acquiring rights to copyrighted works and ideas for rides. However, nowadays, Disney has to be pretty careful not to 'steal' a concept for an attraction, from one of the far greater number of movies, TV shows, video games, comic books, etc. Basically, the waters of copyright violation litigation have gotten a LOT deeper since Disneyland became such a success, and Disney's pockets are a lot more attractive, too. So, Disney is safer, in a legal sense, basing attractions on intellectual property that they already own free and clear.
                                .

                                I don't think this is really an obstacle to original attractions. Unless it was a blatant rip-off (in which case, it wouldn't be original) Disney would own it just as free-and-clear as they own their films, and it would be no more and no less susceptible to accusations of copying than pretty much anything else the company does. For example, The Lion King (a film which inspired a WDW attraction, among other things) has been accused of copying Kimba: The White Lion, and several posters on MiceChat (not me, but see above ) feel that movie-based attraction Splash Mountain is a ripoff of Knott's Calico Log Ride.

                                It is interesting to note that, while PotC is often held up as the example of originality (I have used it as such many times), Freedomland in New York featured a Pirate ride in their New Orleans section, years before Disneyland did.

                                Originally posted by The Darkrides of Freedomland" Website]

                                [URL="http://www.dafe.org/attractions/parks/freedomland/freedomland.php
                                The Darkrides of Freedomland (Bronx, NY) [DAFE][/URL]

                                Just across the way, The Buccaneers adventure awaited one and all. This time the method of travel was in a boat-like vehicle adorned with a skull serving as a sort of hood ornament.

                                Traveling through the opening scenes in the pub lent one a feeling of the forbidden as the pirates here all had a threatening, dangerous look in their faces. An interesting aspect of many dark rides are the mysterious wooden doors which often separate different chambers inside. Your vehicle slams into these doors and they part before you, adding another element of the unexpected to the experience. The Buccaneers Ride made good use of these contraptions. You both entered and exited the pub through such doors, and just when you thought you were safely past the menacing Bucs you found yourself sailing between dueling pirate ships, complete with cannon fire and flashing lights.

                                More scenes were to follow depicting pirates sailing by lighted buoys, digging for treasure beneath palm trees, and various evening island scenes. The action exploded in rapid order as skeletons frolicked about and a hapless pirate was hung. In the last scene a sea serpent reared it's ugly head while emitting a bone chilling shriek. In later years Disney would introduce the Pirates of the Caribbean adventure to it's famous park, and it was to closely follow the gist of Freedomland's earlier version. Disney's ride was more technically advanced, and it is interesting for those who have experienced them both to compare the differing results that a few years of technical development could bring about.



                                Nonetheless, while I can't say from personal experience, I'm sure Disneyland's version still had a lot of originality beyond the technical advances, even though the concept had been done before, (as most concepts probably have, in one form or another.)

                                Oh, and yes, I think Disneyland is purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 .
                                Last edited by animagusurreal; 10-11-2009, 05:25 AM. Reason: Yikes! I accidentally said, "Bogart and Bacall"
                                "Happy Working Song" parody for DCA remodel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-TYESfNTP8&feature=plcp

                                Retro Rant Review of "The Hunchback of Notre Dame II" (comedy review of direct-to-video
                                Disney sequel):
                                Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/user/animagus.../1/q1j7FU8QXu0
                                Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/user/animagus.../0/sasNTMDRBLU

                                Retro Rant Review of "Home on the Range" (comedy review of Disney movie):
                                Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7mC-...feature=relmfu
                                Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qoUie...feature=relmfu
                                Part 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3Vea...feature=relmfu


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                                Pratfall the albatross superheroine visits the Carthay Circle Theatre.

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                                • #17
                                  Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                                  Originally posted by Bob Weaver View Post
                                  Space Mountain was the final piece of the puzzle and brought Tomorrowland to fulfillment. The Tomorrowland of 1977 to 1985 was the best it ever got, though I did prefer the Carousel of Progress to America Sings, that's just a minor quibble.
                                  I simply could not agree with you more, Bob.

                                  Well, there's another minor quibble...when they added that silly "Superspeed Tunnel" and "Tron" to the PeopleMover.
                                  God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                                    Originally posted by animagusurreal View Post
                                    There are no Bogart and Hepburn AA's on the Jungle Cruise. While African Queen is often mentioned as an inspiration, it seems like the main idea came from Walt's True-Life Adventure nature documentaries. That is, until it was refurbed by Marc Davis into the more humorous (and less movie based) attraction we know today.
                                    Not to nitpick, but here's how the Park's official Complete Guide to Disneyland describes Adventureland and the "Jungle River Boat Ride" in 1956:
                                    ADVENTURELAND

                                    Satisfy your longing to travel to far away places... all the color and excitement of the tropics.

                                    Journey through the mysterious regions of the world, and experience the true life adventure of famous explorers. In Adventureland, described by Walt Disney as "the wonderland of Nature's own design," you'll find lifelike wild animals, crocodiles and jungle natives. You may browse in tropical bazaars examining unique imports, and dine on the terrace of a Polynesian restaurant while the little river boats steam into port after their travels past waterfalls, rapids, savages and" "wild animals."

                                    Photo captions:
                                    Entrance to Adventureland and the start of your trip to far-away places.

                                    Jungle River explorer's boats await boarding passengers for a thrilling trip down the tropical rivers of Adventureland.

                                    An Adventureland boat skipper points out the beautiful orchid country on a tropical river ride.

                                    Your explorer's boat narrowly misses a waterfall on its trip through Adventureland's rivers.

                                    Two giraffes peer over the jungle brush along Adventureland's River

                                    Thrills and excitement as a hippo "charges" a river boat in Adventureland.

                                    Hippos startle and thrill passengers aboard Adventureland's river boat.


                                    Consider what was being sold to the public: the story was the mid-20th century myth of the tropics as remote, exotic, exciting and dangerous. The pitch was that you went there, on a journey to a far away land.

                                    Now consider what was not being sold. Other than one mention of the words "true life adventure," there was no mention of 1955's The African Lion, nor any of the other films of Disney's True Life Adventure and People and Places series.

                                    Again, when given an opportunity to market Studio product, Walt chose to make Disneyland its own brand. He didn't diminish Adventureland by calling it "True Life Adventureland." He didn't turn the "Jungle River Ride" into a promotion for The African Lion. There were no plush lion cubs for sale in Adventureland, but rubber snakes, shrunken heads and native spears. And when Disneyland's "Jungle River Ride" proved to be a hit, he didn't make a "Jungle River Ride" movie.

                                    Unlike today, Walt didn't make Disneyland a collection of marketing pitches for the Studio's film brands. Walt poured creativity into Disneyland's show to make Disneyland itself the brand.



                                    Originally posted by Aladdin View Post
                                    So is DL trying to erase Tomorrowerland '98 from their history? Or was this just a boo-boo? They really ought not to forget the history of the failure of TL'98, so they never repeat those mistakes.
                                    Judging from Tony's interview in the last issue of E-Ticket magazine, Tomorrowland is 'way down the priority list, if on the list at all.

                                    That's the same article where he proudly called Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage "our major E-Ticket."


                                    Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 10-11-2009, 09:20 AM.
                                    "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                                    it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                                    together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                                    designed to appeal to everyone."

                                    - Walt Disney

                                    "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                                    - Michael Eisner

                                    "It's very symbiotic."
                                    - Bob Chapek

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                                      Originally posted by BiggestDisneyFan View Post
                                      Some later attractions that are/were not based on movies:

                                      Mulholland Madness (not that I actually like it)
                                      Tower of Terror (not brand-new, per-se, but not based on a movie)
                                      Rocket Rods (was original, but had ill-fated technical flaws)
                                      Isn't the Tower of Terror based on The Twilight Zone tv show.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Re: Is Disneyland purposely avoiding mentioning Tomorrowland '98 makeover?

                                        Tony Baxter doesn't consider Space Mountain to be of E-ticket caliber? It was back during the era of ride tickets. I remember the first time I walked into the room where you board the vehicles and seeing the room and the huge spacecraft thing I let out an involuntary "Whoa...." and then "Oh wow." The pre-show alone is almost an E-ticket attraction.

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