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  • [Chat] The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

    Have you ever rode Pirates of the Caribbean and just want to take in all the details and scenery of the ride, then all of a sudden you look at a certain area and you see small ventilation covers on the ceiling, or notice that the tree in the Bayou scene is just a support structure of the roof?

    I usually find myself looking back at a scene that I wanted to inspect a little more, then I notice the show lights and how they are just in plain view if you were to ever look behind you. It just kind of ruins the atmosphere sometimes. Or perhaps you like to find these kinds of details.

    Anyone had this experience on a ride before?


  • #2
    Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

    Yes, I'm exactly the same as you. The thing that COULD NOT stop looking at on Radiator Springs Racers was all the show lights/roof beams in plain sight. I think that RSR and Indy are the worst for me, but I don't really know what Disney could do about it, because obviously show lights are necessary .

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    • #3
      Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

      Yeah, I'm like that too. Although I blame myself, not Disney! Unless you force peoples heads to face in only one direction with some kind of head restraint, and put all the action in front of them, people will look up or around and they'll see things like that. It's impossible for them to hide it all! I noticed myself seeing a lot of things like that on HM on our trip last month, but when I noticed myself doing it I'd usually give myself a mental shake and remind myself to focus on the magic! Imagination requires a little work on our parts, too.
      ..:: DLR Trips: 1994, 1999, 2012 ::..

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      • #4
        Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

        I think peter pan is one of the few rides that no matter how many times I look around, You're still enchanted by the effects and never really notice show lights and such. The stars during the flight over London still amaze me.

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        • #5
          Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

          You know the pirate sitting on the bridge, swinging his leg back and forth over the edge? I once looked up at him as we passed directly under and caught sight of his animatronic "knee." I can't go through that area now without checking out the machine behind the curtain.


          For some some great trip reports, features and reviews, please check out http://www.thedisneylandreport.com.

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          • #6
            Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

            I find myself noticing the equipment more and more...especially since I started looking behind me on dark rides.

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            • #7
              Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

              Originally posted by ohmyjustin View Post
              I find myself noticing the equipment more and more...especially since I started looking behind me on dark rides.
              You mean like when you're looking for the hidden country bears on winnie the pooh?


              For some some great trip reports, features and reviews, please check out http://www.thedisneylandreport.com.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

                Originally posted by disneylandreport View Post
                You mean like when you're looking for the hidden country bears on winnie the pooh?
                Seeing that on here was the reason I actually started looking back. I'm determined to find something worthwhile like that in another attraction!

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                • #9
                  Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

                  Originally posted by disneylandreport View Post
                  You mean like when you're looking for the hidden country bears on winnie the pooh?
                  Actually that's my favorite part of Pooh Bear and when I mention that to my friends they enjoy it too! Things like the bears don't ruin the magic for me as much as make me appreciate the little things you can find that make the ride more special. Often people don't notice something like the country bears though.

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                  • #10
                    Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

                    You're not being too attentive to details; you're going too much.

                    Disneyland should be experienced once a year. Too much, and... well you know.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

                      Originally posted by animark View Post
                      Have you ever rode Pirates of the Caribbean and just want to take in all the details and scenery of the ride, then all of a sudden you look at a certain area and you see small ventilation covers on the ceiling, or notice that the tree in the Bayou scene is just a support structure of the roof?

                      I usually find myself looking back at a scene that I wanted to inspect a little more, then I notice the show lights and how they are just in plain view if you were to ever look behind you. It just kind of ruins the atmosphere sometimes. Or perhaps you like to find these kinds of details.

                      Anyone had this experience on a ride before?
                      I noticed this too, over the past couple years on Pirates, perhaps after the Johnny Depp rehab . . . I think that you can always hide the show lights though, and wish Disney would make more effort to do this on certain rides. If the show light is far back enough, you can't see it, plus with little LED lights, and even fiber optics, you don't need to have such big show lights, IMHO.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

                        Originally posted by Steve DeGaetano View Post
                        You're not being too attentive to details; you're going too much.

                        Disneyland should be experienced once a year. Too much, and... well you know.
                        I disagree with this 100%. I've been over 100 times in the last 3 years. As I write this I'm jonesing for my next visit. Keep the kid in you alive and you can love the park back like it loves you. Every time.


                        For some some great trip reports, features and reviews, please check out http://www.thedisneylandreport.com.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

                          "Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain."

                          I enjoy finding out how the magic is done. As an amateur haunter, I know how expensive and hard it is to build even a simple animated prop, let alone a complicated prop that works hour after hour. Take The Tiki Room, for example. Each of those birds has numerous solenoids & motors which make them move. All of the wiring is concealed in the thin perches on which they sit. I'd just love to get my hands on one of those birds for a couple of days. One time sit back by the windows & find out how that rain illusion actually works. Your appreciation of the Imagineers' ingenuity will increase greatly.

                          Lighting is a very under appreciated aspect of any show. There's another rain illusion in Pooh that is interesting. While you are at it, take a closer look at the water overflowing in that same tableau. Another fairly impressive feat is to try to find an unintended shadow in any Disney attraction. The lighting is very good & is generally done with very little wattage. After all, they are known as dark rides.
                          Lately, they have been replacing older lighting with LED systems. You can spot the newer lighting because you will see a number of smaller circular lights where a single larger lamp used to be. The old lighting fixtures are usually quite large & some will have "fins" to dissipate the heat. The Golden Horshoe has a number of these visible in the balcony. I believe all of the lighting at the Mad T Party is of the newer variety.
                          There are myriad other functional items that are hidden in plain sight. It is quite a tribute to the Imagineers that they are so difficult to spot. How many times did you enjoy Pirates before you noticed that the tree "is just a support structure"? That is the Disney detail that we all expect.
                          As you become more familiar with the attractions, these things become more noticeable. That isn't a bad thing. The Pepper's Ghost illusion used in the Haunted Mansion Banquet Hall is well over 100 years old. It is nothing new, but the scale of it is preposterous. It is another lighting achievement. I would pay some serious $$ to see exactly how they have that illusion lit.

                          It isn't always important what you are looking at, but how you are looking at it
                          Skiddley Whiffers is a cruel mistress; cold and unforgiving.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

                            Originally posted by gomezaddams View Post
                            "Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain."

                            I enjoy finding out how the magic is done. As an amateur haunter, I know how expensive and hard it is to build even a simple animated prop, let alone a complicated prop that works hour after hour. Take The Tiki Room, for example. Each of those birds has numerous solenoids & motors which make them move. All of the wiring is concealed in the thin perches on which they sit. I'd just love to get my hands on one of those birds for a couple of days. One time sit back by the windows & find out how that rain illusion actually works. Your appreciation of the Imagineers' ingenuity will increase greatly.

                            Lighting is a very under appreciated aspect of any show. There's another rain illusion in Pooh that is interesting. While you are at it, take a closer look at the water overflowing in that same tableau. Another fairly impressive feat is to try to find an unintended shadow in any Disney attraction. The lighting is very good & is generally done with very little wattage. After all, they are known as dark rides.
                            Lately, they have been replacing older lighting with LED systems. You can spot the newer lighting because you will see a number of smaller circular lights where a single larger lamp used to be. The old lighting fixtures are usually quite large & some will have "fins" to dissipate the heat. The Golden Horshoe has a number of these visible in the balcony. I believe all of the lighting at the Mad T Party is of the newer variety.
                            There are myriad other functional items that are hidden in plain sight. It is quite a tribute to the Imagineers that they are so difficult to spot. How many times did you enjoy Pirates before you noticed that the tree "is just a support structure"? That is the Disney detail that we all expect.
                            As you become more familiar with the attractions, these things become more noticeable. That isn't a bad thing. The Pepper's Ghost illusion used in the Haunted Mansion Banquet Hall is well over 100 years old. It is nothing new, but the scale of it is preposterous. It is another lighting achievement. I would pay some serious $$ to see exactly how they have that illusion lit.

                            It isn't always important what you are looking at, but how you are looking at it
                            Very well said. I think it was during my 2005 visit to disneyland was when I noticed the tree as a support structure. I guess my curiosity for how they did it, and my want for things to stay as magic as they were in my childhood fight each other over what I want overall.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: The Consequences of being too attentive to details.

                              I hate that feeling, OP.

                              I try to use my imagination as hard as I can so that I can see the ride how a child would see it :
                              amazingly and magically!

                              On pirates of the carribbean the part where you're approaching the final room with the pirates sitting on the cannons, I like to look all around where the wood is piled up above and around you, because that's one of the places where you are really immersed in the ride and there's no mechanical/unmagical thing in sight. It's awesome, you should try that to make yourself feel better.

                              On the rides where there's an obvious part, don't look. The rides are SO much better when you make yourself be completely oblivious to the "behind the scenes" Disney strives so hard to hide. I feel bad that they go above and beyond trying to hide the wires, yet sometimes they are still visible. In honor of keeping imagination alive and Disney's "no strings" motto alive, I purposefully don't look and keep my eyes peeled to the other wonderful details on the ride that you are supposed to see. Because although there are plenty of details on rides you are not supposed to see (air vents, show lights, mechanical parts, exit signs, etc), there are so many glorious details that you SHOULD see, and should appreciate because the reason they are there is because of the imaginative creators of the ride and the hard work they put into making them..

                              In my opinion, when you stop seeing Disneyland through the eyes of a child, you need to make yourself, and just relax and have fun.

                              I remember hitting that point for me, when I started noticing that stuff and noticing other things, like the forced perspective of the castle and matterhorn to make them appear taller. When I was little those structures seemed monumental and they suddenly seemed puny and insignificant. It made me almost cry when I visited Disneyland and felt this as a teenager.

                              Then I decided, you know what, I won't be able to enjoy Disneyland if I am bummed out by it. If I let myself see all these things that the kids don't see.

                              So I made a choice that day, and I didn't. And I don't. And I won't ever stop letting myself see Disneyland through the eyes of my inner child, or else it would lose all its magic for me.


                              sorry that's my long story

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