Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

Collapse

Get Away Today

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

    Originally posted by CJ2472 View Post
    And their trains are way too clean on the outside. (Clearly no hardcore railroaders there).
    Trains were as clean--or cleaner--back in the era Disney is portraying--the 1890s.

    Comment


    • #22
      Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

      Part of the reason the image looks bad is because this particular Disneyland Railroad conductor is so disheveled. And, the other conductors pictured at the link are wearing short sleeves, which should have never been allowed as part of the costume. This configuration seems sure to create more injuries, though, since there seems to be no place for the conductor to sit and no way for him or her to lean.

      The train movements will create injuries if the conductors have no support and especially if the tracks are not maintained very well.

      ---------- Post added 11-26-2012 at 09:38 AM ----------

      In fact, a better configuration would be to keep the safety position on the outside of the train and to add railings and a retractable seat. The capacity of the trains would remain the same, and more protection would be given to the conductors.

      The one advantage of this current configuration that I can see is weather protection since many conductors seem to like using umbrellas during inclement weather.
      Last edited by PragmaticIdealist; 11-26-2012, 08:54 AM.

      Comment


      • #23
        Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

        Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
        This configuration seems sure to create more injuries, though, since there seems to be no place for the conductor to sit and no way for him or her to lean.
        The conductor shouldn't be sitting OR leaning. There are plenty of hand rails for him/her to grab onto.

        Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
        The train movements will create injuries if the conductors have no support and especially if the tracks are not maintained very well.
        They don't need support--they need to hang on and be prepared for the sometimes-erratic movements of the train. The track is in excellent condition; the biggest factor in the train's movement will be the skill of the engineer.

        Comment


        • #24
          Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

          Conductors don't get to choose the engineers operating the locomotives.

          Comment


          • #25
            Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

            We saw this over our thanksgiving 4 day trip many times. The space allotted could fit three people easily. The cm's we spoke with (sitting next to the cage) told us that they felt it was unnecessary with one gal actually telling us she felt it hindered her ability to track the guests within the train since her field of vision was narrowed to the car she rode in and the one next door. I don't find it distracting from my experience, but I could easily see what she meant.

            Comment


            • #26
              Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

              Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
              Conductors don't get to choose the engineers operating the locomotives.
              Never said they did--which is why they need to be prepared for any contingency or operational situation.

              ---------- Post added 11-26-2012 at 08:09 PM ----------

              Originally posted by Acpisme View Post
              The cm's we spoke with (sitting next to the cage) told us that they felt it was unnecessary with one gal actually telling us she felt it hindered her ability to track the guests within the train since her field of vision was narrowed to the car she rode in and the one next door.
              As I noted earlier in this thread, the position may be safer for the conductors, but less safe for the guests.

              Comment


              • #27
                Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

                So the CM we spoke with validated your point!

                Comment


                • #28
                  Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

                  Originally posted by Acpisme View Post
                  So the CM we spoke with validated your point!
                  Exactly!

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

                    I haven't been on the trains in a while. I'll have to take a look at 'em next time I'm up there.
                    I know that as a CM when you were the forward conductor, you had to be ready and able to hop off at a moment's notice if there was a guest standing on the platform outside of the fence. As the train was coming around the bend or through the tunnel, be it NOS, Fantasyland, or Tomorrowland, if you heard a sharp whistle you knew the engineer was saying there was something amiss, and it was usually a guest on the platform, not inside the queue. You had to be off in a split second and quickly escort the guest back off the platform so the train could come in to the station.
                    Not having seen these booths though, I'm not sure how much they would impact that potential response.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

                      I think it's bizarre.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

                        This reminds me of the conductor booths in the NYC subway system, so other trains work successfully this way, for what it's worth. A subway's not the same as a stream train, etc. etc. etc., so that's just an observation.

                        I honestly don't know enough to make an informed decision one way or the other, but if it makes the conductors' work safer and easier, yay. If it doesn't help in those respects, it's a shame. Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	40.6 KB
ID:	7346992I'd think the ability to jump off in a split second if a guest needed aid would indeed be helpful.
                        Merida looks like this. Not a Barbie doll!

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

                          Subway systems and things like that I don't even count as trains, they're more like cheapo metal boxes on rail. But from that picture and the subway stuff that I've ridden...it's all automated and the operator has a clear straight view across the platform. In contrast, I'd think it to be very important for anyone on train crew there to have a good field of view...there are many children and teens too that can get out of hand...and safety is big there...

                          Steve...I totally get that Disney, not just the railroad but the whole park...they "decorate" and present their "props" in the idealistic, "perfect" way. Obviously there never was a main street that looked that perfect, clean and well painted. Disney likes their stuff looking good. And at the happiest place on earth it is very appropriate and definitely a requirement...I do hope they use the right stuff to wipe it down...does anyone know what they use?

                          Anyways, I was coming at this more from the perspective as one who does restoration work on historic equipment, particularly steam engines. Steam engines are built and designed to rip themselves apart, and crap all over themselves, and depending on where you are when it's alive or in bed, on you too. Then again, you have more surface area to get stuff on you if you work on standard guage, versus narrow guage.

                          One other thing that disturbs me was the knowledge of the engineers...the friend that pointed this forum out to me also talked to me about a cab ride he got...and the one at the fuel valve, according to him, described how the blower works incorrectly: steam coming out of the firebox to create the draft...

                          I started out in the engine shop, and you work UP to operations, instead of the other way around. You learn every part of the engine, every pipe, fitting, EVERYTHING. So that you know why you do what you do and it's so much easier to learn...yes firing is an art and it takes time for that and train handling just takes a bit of experience in the hot seat...but if you know your train tonnage, grade, and have a little time to experiment with your sets its not a massive undertaking...At least that's my opinion. I've also heard from him that they use buzzers now...what happened to hand-signals...?? highball is 2 waves of the right hand! not that hard to remember.

                          Thoughts?


                          Originally posted by Malina View Post
                          This reminds me of the conductor booths in the NYC subway system, so other trains work successfully this way, for what it's worth. A subway's not the same as a stream train, etc. etc. etc., so that's just an observation.

                          I honestly don't know enough to make an informed decision one way or the other, but if it makes the conductors' work safer and easier, yay. If it doesn't help in those respects, it's a shame. [ATTACH=CONFIG]25322[/ATTACH]I'd think the ability to jump off in a split second if a guest needed aid would indeed be helpful.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

                            Originally posted by CJ2472 View Post
                            One other thing that disturbs me was the knowledge of the engineers...the friend that pointed this forum out to me also talked to me about a cab ride he got...and the one at the fuel valve, according to him, described how the blower works incorrectly: steam coming out of the firebox to create the draft...
                            The training the engine crew receives is definitely more of a "fast track" than what those of us in the museum community receive--I didn't get certified as a fireman until two years after I started volunteering, after I got to do most of the grunge jobs like climbing into the firebox to clean it, smokebox scrubbing, removing axle cellars, etc. So yes, I know lots about the workings of our engine from the inside out.

                            At DL, there is a definite division of labor: The guys who work on the engines stay in the roundhouse; the guys that operate them never get to help repair them. Which means the operating engineers may not necessarily have a good solid understanding of the inner workings: They know they need to keep water up and pressure on the peg--just enough knowledge to let them do their job.

                            Lots of these guys do this simply as a job; when they explain things to guests, they may not use the correct terminology.

                            The simple fact is, the trains are being seen and treated more and more like typical amusement park rides; the old block signal system they used to use has been removed, and cab signals have taken their place. The route can be controlled from the roundhouse electronically, and if not already in place, there will soon be a system for someone back in the roundhouse to press a big red "E-stop" button to shut down the trains remotely. It's a sad state of affairs to see this historic attraction reduced to the same level as a roller coaster, and the engine crew turned into "ride operators."

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Re: Disneyland Railroad Conductor Booth

                              Yeah...it is sad. I love the engines themselves (without all the modified crap...) For example I understand the solar panels on the roof for power instead of a dynamo (cause the dynamo wasn't invented till the early 1900s...) but the TWO block lights in the cab (as if one is not enough...) the buzzers that are replacing communication and handsignals, the conductors booth...things like that take simple fun realistic aspect of railroading, and replace it with boring things the crew does...making it not even interesting for the guests...

                              I wonder if the guys in charge of the trains. (not the upper level executives that don't even get their hands dirty let alone walk in the shop)...if those guys follow up on the museum and volunteer world...me, like so many others that I know...check RyPN on a regular basis...cause trainorders is just foamers and their wishful thinking and "weird" comments...although there is some news there...

                              Maybe something should happen where museum volunteers and like the steam guys in So-Cal, like the guys at OERM and the '51 guys, go visit and re-work the system. Starting with a better training system. And meetings so the guys doing the dirty work can better communicate with the executive who thinks he/she is making a smart move while only minimizing the value of a nice train ride.






                              Originally posted by Steve DeGaetano View Post
                              The training the engine crew receives is definitely more of a "fast track" than what those of us in the museum community receive--I didn't get certified as a fireman until two years after I started volunteering, after I got to do most of the grunge jobs like climbing into the firebox to clean it, smokebox scrubbing, removing axle cellars, etc. So yes, I know lots about the workings of our engine from the inside out.

                              At DL, there is a definite division of labor: The guys who work on the engines stay in the roundhouse; the guys that operate them never get to help repair them. Which means the operating engineers may not necessarily have a good solid understanding of the inner workings: They know they need to keep water up and pressure on the peg--just enough knowledge to let them do their job.

                              Lots of these guys do this simply as a job; when they explain things to guests, they may not use the correct terminology.

                              The simple fact is, the trains are being seen and treated more and more like typical amusement park rides; the old block signal system they used to use has been removed, and cab signals have taken their place. The route can be controlled from the roundhouse electronically, and if not already in place, there will soon be a system for someone back in the roundhouse to press a big red "E-stop" button to shut down the trains remotely. It's a sad state of affairs to see this historic attraction reduced to the same level as a roller coaster, and the engine crew turned into "ride operators."

                              Comment

                              Get Away Today Footer

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X