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  • [Other] A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...


  • #2
    Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

    As a long time passholder myself, you beat me by about 5 years, I can imagine how saddening this must before you. But I can't think of a better reason to replace it with than a better future for your children and hopefully that will bring you some comfort. Hopefully you will be able to visit the park with at least a one day ticket in the not to distant future. The great thing about Disneyland is its not going anywhere and it will be there for you when you return with new rides and experiences for you and your family to enjoy. And that day will be a great day.

    Micenation

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

      You've been a member for over three yrs! And this is your first post? That is very sad.

      I am glad you do not blame Disney. And you shouldn't. No one should. It is a sign of the times and you hit the nail on this one when you mentioned the economy.

      This is what the economy is doing to the middle class. We have to take out some luxuries in order to make ends meet. We are a country full of generations who DO NOT know what it means to go without for the most part and I know first hand how this feels now. I am glad that it is only Disneyland and not food/shelter that you must cut out of your life. But it makes me wonder what is next? Who is next?

      I wish you the best and I do hope you are able to return to DLR, and soon!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

        I'm your age. I grew up in SoCal.

        Why don't you just save and go once a year--like everyone did back when you and I were kids? Seemed to make the yearly visits far more special than when you could just "go on a whim."

        My sister and I would start planning months in advance, the excitement building by the day. And, on the rare occasion that our parents did tells us the date of the trip, we couldn't sleep the night before. Those were grand, exciting times indeed. That's when the Park was truly magical. Something to be savored; the anticipation alone delicious.

        I remember reading a Christmas story as a child, about a kid whose wish that every day could be Christmas came true. The magical holiday quickly lost all its magic, mystery and allure once it became commonplace and everyday.

        Is there anything in this world of percieved value that can stay that way if it becomes routine and ordinary? If you are giving up on Disneyland because you simply cannot go every day, then you are truly forgetting what Disneyland was all about.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

          Born in 1966 too! We were lucky enough to get the tip that the passes were going to go up so we bought them at the old price and are waiting until January to activate them. That will give us one more year, but beyond that we just don't know--especially since the prices are sure to raise again by then...

          We knew the day would eventually come, but it's strange to actually be approaching it...
          L + L = R

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

            Great post! I feel like almost all of us here can relate to that issue. Sorry to hear you're giving up the AP, but on the bright side you've spent many years in the park (and had your kids grow up there, too!) which is the most important thing. Disneyland will always be there and like Steve mentioned - maybe you can save up every once in a while and drop back in for a while?


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            • #7
              Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

              Originally posted by Steve DeGaetano View Post
              I'm your age. I grew up in SoCal.

              Why don't you just save and go once a year--like everyone did back when you and I were kids? Seemed to make the yearly visits far more special than when you could just "go on a whim."

              My sister and I would start planning months in advance, the excitement building by the day. And, on the rare occasion that our parents did tells us the date of the trip, we couldn't sleep the night before. Those were grand, exciting times indeed. That's when the Park was truly magical. Something to be savored; the anticipation alone delicious.

              I remember reading a Christmas story as a child, about a kid whose wish that every day could be Christmas came true. The magical holiday quickly lost all its magic, mystery and allure once it became commonplace and everyday.

              Is there anything in this world of percieved value that can stay that way if it becomes routine and ordinary? If you are giving up on Disneyland because you simply cannot go every day, then you are truly forgetting what Disneyland was all about.

              I do remember the "once a year" fondly (and also remember that story about Christmas every day!), but we've never used our passes to go "on a whim". We still live hours away.

              It's just that everyone has their own personal situations as to how much money they have and how much they can spend and still feel comfortable with the experience.

              Sure just going one time a year is do-able, but just like the annual pass there is a personal breaking point where the cost becomes uncomfortable. And most everyone has that point, some just higher than others. For example, we are both foodies, but find we really don't enjoy really high price meals because even though we can afford it--it just no longer feels "right".

              Even if a one day ticket was $1,000 we could swing it with the tax return, but just couldn't/wouldn't bring ourselves to do it. I'm not exactly sure where our final breaking point will be (much less than $1,000 a ticket!) but for us it's approaching that uncomfortable level and it seems like that's happening for a lot of guests too.
              L + L = R

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                Originally posted by Steve DeGaetano View Post
                I'm your age. I grew up in SoCal.

                Why don't you just save and go once a year--like everyone did back when you and I were kids? Seemed to make the yearly visits far more special than when you could just "go on a whim."
                BINGO! We have a winner!

                I will never understand the distinctly 21st century phenomenon that is quarantined only to those living between Ventura and San Diego wherein it is widely assumed that the only way to be able to go to Disneyland is to buy everyone in the family an Annual Pass for some large amount of money.

                And if you can't afford Annual Passes for the entire family year after year, then you have to "say goodbye" to Disneyland and never return. I will just never understand that.

                Want to take the wife and kids to Disneyland? Pick a day, load up the car, and buy $85 tickets for everyone when you get there. Spend the whole day there, like Walt Disney and his Imagineers designed the place to be spent. Take pictures. Buy a t-shirt. Go on all your favorite rides. Have fun. And then don't go back for at least another year, perhaps two or three.

                It's much, much cheaper that way. And you'll be visiting Disneyland the way it was originally designed to be visited and enjoyed.

                And if spending 85 bucks once per year on a ticket for a 15 hour day is still too much money for you, then that's cool too. There are a lot of folks who just can't swing that kind of luxury item, just as there are a lot of folks who can't afford to buy their clothes at Nordstrom or who can't afford a $200 ticket to an NFL Chargers game that only lasts two hours.
                Last edited by Westsider; 11-27-2012, 08:50 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                  Originally posted by Steve DeGaetano View Post
                  I'm your age. I grew up in SoCal.

                  Why don't you just save and go once a year--like everyone did back when you and I were kids? Seemed to make the yearly visits far more special than when you could just "go on a whim."

                  My sister and I would start planning months in advance, the excitement building by the day. And, on the rare occasion that our parents did tells us the date of the trip, we couldn't sleep the night before. Those were grand, exciting times indeed. That's when the Park was truly magical. Something to be savored; the anticipation alone delicious.

                  I remember reading a Christmas story as a child, about a kid whose wish that every day could be Christmas came true. The magical holiday quickly lost all its magic, mystery and allure once it became commonplace and everyday.

                  Is there anything in this world of percieved value that can stay that way if it becomes routine and ordinary? If you are giving up on Disneyland because you simply cannot go every day, then you are truly forgetting what Disneyland was all about.
                  That one is tied for Post of the Year with this one:

                  Originally posted by Westsider View Post
                  BINGO! We have a winner!

                  I will never understand the distinctly 21st century phenomenon that is quarantined only to those living between Ventura and San Diego wherein it is widely assumed that the only way to be able to go to Disneyland is to buy everyone in the family an Annual Pass for some large amount of money.

                  And if you can't afford Annual Passes for the entire family year after year, then you have to "say goodbye" to Disneyland and never return. I will just never understand that.

                  Want to take the wife and kids to Disneyland? Pick a day, load up the car, and buy $85 tickets for everyone when you get there. Spend the whole day there, like Walt Disney and his Imagineers designed the place to be spent. Take pictures. Buy a t-shirt. Go on all your favorite rides. Have fun. And then don't go back for at least another year, perhaps two or three.

                  It's much, much cheaper that way. And you'll be visiting Disneyland the way it was originally designed to be visited and enjoyed.

                  And if spending 85 bucks once per year on a ticket for a 15 hour day is still too much money for you, then that's cool too. There are a lot of folks who just can't swing that kind of luxury item, just as there are a lot of folks who can't afford to buy their clothes at Nordstrom or who can't afford a $200 ticket to an NFL Chargers game that only lasts two hours.
                  :thumbup: :thumbup:
                  "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                  it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                  together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                  designed to appeal to everyone."

                  - Walt Disney

                  "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                  - Michael Eisner

                  "It's very symbiotic."
                  - Bob Chapek

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                    The best deal is the Halloween time events. No only is the price significantly cheaper than the regular park admission, you get free candy and they let you in 3 hours earlier. Don't forget the Spring 2 fer passes are coming soon.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                      Originally posted by Steve DeGaetano View Post
                      I'm your age. I grew up in SoCal.

                      Why don't you just save and go once a year--like everyone did back when you and I were kids? Seemed to make the yearly visits far more special than when you could just "go on a whim."

                      My sister and I would start planning months in advance, the excitement building by the day. And, on the rare occasion that our parents did tells us the date of the trip, we couldn't sleep the night before. Those were grand, exciting times indeed. That's when the Park was truly magical. Something to be savored; the anticipation alone delicious.

                      I remember reading a Christmas story as a child, about a kid whose wish that every day could be Christmas came true. The magical holiday quickly lost all its magic, mystery and allure once it became commonplace and everyday.

                      Is there anything in this world of percieved value that can stay that way if it becomes routine and ordinary? If you are giving up on Disneyland because you simply cannot go every day, then you are truly forgetting what Disneyland was all about.

                      Great post. I agree 100%
                      I open a toy, review it and take mediocore pictures. Read all about it HERE!

                      Originally posted by VintageMouse;n8463446

                      You know best :-)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                        I get where the intent of this is going and agree. The inflation of an annual pass doesn't line up with a similar bar graph of inflation in general. It's like you said, a way to thin the herd. As one of the thinned, there's a certain animosity that comes with that.

                        Let's face it, Disney is losing annual passholders with this latest move and they LOVE it. They're getting more money from those who stayed on and trimming the herd down. They don't see it as a loss, for them it's a fiscal success. The residual effect of their decision is an embittered collection of loyal fans with a pretty well deserved case of WTF?! I have some real mixed feelings about this. It's one more way the magic turns tragic to me.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                          Originally posted by fifthrider View Post
                          I get where the intent of this is going and agree. The inflation of an annual pass doesn't line up with a similar bar graph of inflation in general. It's like you said, a way to thin the herd. As one of the thinned, there's a certain animosity that comes with that.

                          Let's face it, Disney is losing annual passholders with this latest move and they LOVE it. They're getting more money from those who stayed on and trimming the herd down. They don't see it as a loss, for them it's a fiscal success. The residual effect of their decision is an embittered collection of loyal fans with a pretty well deserved case of WTF?! I have some real mixed feelings about this. It's one more way the magic turns tragic to me.
                          I open a toy, review it and take mediocore pictures. Read all about it HERE!

                          Originally posted by VintageMouse;n8463446

                          You know best :-)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                            Originally posted by fifthrider View Post
                            I get where the intent of this is going and agree. The inflation of an annual pass doesn't line up with a similar bar graph of inflation in general. It's like you said, a way to thin the herd. As one of the thinned, there's a certain animosity that comes with that.

                            Let's face it, Disney is losing annual passholders with this latest move and they LOVE it. They're getting more money from those who stayed on and trimming the herd down. They don't see it as a loss, for them it's a fiscal success. The residual effect of their decision is an embittered collection of loyal fans with a pretty well deserved case of WTF?! I have some real mixed feelings about this. It's one more way the magic turns tragic to me.

                            How is it that they LOVE losing customers?
                            they'd LOVE it even more if everyone renewed and new AP's were sold on top.

                            the inflation rate does not match the rising AP prices or your income. The inflation rate is not a standard to match to, unless its gas, eggs or milk.

                            the costs of having people inside the parks may have risen to justify an increased price for an AP. I have still not been shown, found or seen evidence that any of these claims are nothing more than assumptions.

                            saying that, I'll add my theory. The actual cost of having a body inside the parks is a fraction of the ticket price. The cost is closer to $35 per person per day. The business of Disneyland is more conglomerates businesses than just one entity. You have the merchandising, the licensing, the promotions and advertising, the food and beverage, the customer service, the performers, the employees... All separate. All paid separately and not every business is paid by gate revenue.

                            Many assume The perceived cost is above the ticket price and the AP's are to blame.

                            We won't ever know until some figures are released by the mouse. Lol. And with the mouse building it's empire with major acquisitions like Marvel and Lucasfilm... The discussions relating to AP's causing such grief are moot.

                            to the original poster, I totally understand your situation.
                            The ecomnomy is making it tougher and tougher to enjoy things like AP's. it's making it harder to even enjoy an occasional night out for many. The American dream seems to be fading.

                            so long as you have your health, home and family.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                              Originally posted by StevenW View Post
                              The best deal is the Halloween time events. No only is the price significantly cheaper than the regular park admission, you get free candy and they let you in 3 hours earlier. Don't forget the Spring 2 fer passes are coming soon.
                              I concur. We took a two-year break from the Disneyland with just one trip to the Halloween party, which we liked. (Parking is included.)

                              After our APs expire in July, we won't renew, but we might get them just once more after another two-year break. My daughter and I have been appreciating it more after our time away. We live 30 miles away and if the distance were greater then we wouldn't have APs and our visits would be even less frequent and more special.

                              I grew up in Wisconsin, and in the 1970s we drove to Florida every summer with a week at the beach and a day at the Magic Kingdom. I looked forward to that day at Walt Disney World much more than Christmas or my birthday. If you do find yourself with enough money for APs again, maybe skip them and instead get your Disney fix in Tokyo or Paris. Going to a different, alternative-reality Magic Kingdom messes with your Disney dreams (I mean the dreams while you sleep) in the most wonderful way.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                                I fully agree with the OP's first post, but I also agree with only going once a year. That's the way most of us 60s and 70s children knew Disneyland. In my personal case living only a few miles away now, I feel like without admission, I'd have nothing else to do - it's a major part of my life and recreation. With that said, if the next price increase is as dramatic as the last, I can clearly see a need to cut back at least to SoCal pass level, if not back to traditional tickets. Man, that'll suck at first, but it'll be a good step in returning the magic that we all used to feel with each annual trip.
                                Please consider the environment before printing useless emails

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                                  We as a family rely on a tight budget to be able to purchase our passports. Even the most recent spike of $150 per passport our budget was able to handle it. Ain't easy, but it's doable.
                                  I am old. But still love Disneyland.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                                    Also born in 1966 here, and grew up locally in Orange County, but during all the years I was living there, I never owned an AP. So it's always been the once-or-twice-a-year thing for me anyway. Even less now that I live out of state. In fact it's been 7 years since I last went. My sister, who lives locally in OC, is pretty much boycotting Disneyland right now, since they pulled the local resident discounts.

                                    Does it suck? Well, sure. But with YouTube videos and MiceChat and all the other things to keep us apprised of what's going on in the Park... you learn to live with just that.

                                    Honestly, if you can afford a once-a-year trip, count yourself fortunate - some of us can't even afford that.

                                    But not blaming Disney for jacking up their prices? Um, excuse me, why not? Is someone holding a gun to their heads and forcing them to raise ticket prices? No. They choose to raise ticket prices. Why? Gee, ask Bob "I made $30 million this year" Iger. It certainly isn't because their operating costs have doubled in the last 3 years.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                                      Originally posted by Retrocool View Post
                                      They choose to raise ticket prices. Why? Gee, ask Bob "I made $30 million this year" Iger.
                                      People are pointing their fingers in the wrong direction. The only reason they "choose" to raise prices is because they can. Most guests continue to pay. It's called Capitalism. And if you want to place blame for prices increases, we would all do well to look in the mirror.

                                      If revenues start declining, you may see prices decline as well. I don't see that happening until more and more people start taking the OP's approach.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Re: A Fond Farewell to the House of the Mouse...

                                        They're not trying to kill the AP crowd by that much, if they were they'd simply get rid of the infernal payment plan. That would be the biggest drop because people still don't know how to save up for something but they sure know how to charge it (either to cc or bank card).

                                        Comment

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