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  • [Question] Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

    This is a semi-serious semi-non serious question that was in my mind. We all know both Disneyland and California Adventure are starting to become quite cramped and things would have to be demolished in order to expand. That hotel building behind Carsland, the Submarine Lagoon, and surrounding commercial and residential zones...all would have to come down sooner or later in order for that new ride, land, or park to exist. My question is could Disney go down? Down into the ground that is. Right under the parks in order to make a new land. As ridiculous as it sounds, could it work? I mean, avoiding all the underground pipes and being deep enough so the roof won't collapse above you.

    I am no engineer and I can still see problems (Roof cave in, underground obstacles, cost, OSHA, etc.) could​ an underground land work? Or is my mind just being fanciful again?

    Total Tender Rides: 20
    Total Lilly Belle Rides: 9
    Total Dapper Days Attended: 2
    Total Mark Twain Wheelhouse Rides: 5

  • #2
    Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

    What would concern me would be seismic activity, more than anything else...
    Merida looks like this. Not a Barbie doll!

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    • #3
      Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

      I don't think it's possible. There is a high groundwater table underneath the city of Anaheim, and you don't have to dig far to hit water. Notice that not too many places in So Cal have basements. That's partly the reason why.

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      • #4
        Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

        It's already there, kind of . . . subs and Autopia.

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        • #5
          Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

          Originally posted by DisneyIPresume View Post
          I don't think it's possible. There is a high groundwater table underneath the city of Anaheim, and you don't have to dig far to hit water. Notice that not too many places in So Cal have basements. That's partly the reason why.
          Agree.

          It would depend more on the depth of the water table than anything else. It gets horribly expensive to build anything below the water table. And equally expensive to maintain it.

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          • #6
            Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

            There are billions of reasons why it is impractical. Even if you had more money than Disney (hard to comprehend) you would have problems. Although you could engineer said building to be seismic resistant, the cost would be prohibitive. The water table mentioned above by D.I.P. would pose a constant threat. During construction you would need a large adjacent support area available for access. Even if you were able to build it then you would be saddled with high maintenance costs including the massive & noisy ventilation system to keep the air fresh & where would you locate that?
            It would be cheaper to buy the Anaheim Convention Center, raze it, & build a third gate than to build an underground land the size of Toontown.
            Skiddley Whiffers is a cruel mistress; cold and unforgiving.

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            • #7
              Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

              I don't see putting a whole land underground unless a whole land was replaced. Tunneling is very expensive, excavating a bargain in comparison. More rides could add space with basements below them before making them taller.
              Be Cool Stay in School!
              Next year I'm trying for a summer internship at Stark Industries.

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              • #8
                Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

                Much of WestCOT's version of Future World was to be located below grade.

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                • #9
                  Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

                  I wouldn't want a land to be underground. Dampness, moisture, and mildew would cause mold overtime (it wouldn't take long). They would have to put some kind of ventilation system in like air conditioning to make the environment comfortable. With the number of people that would go in the new land, there would be capacity issues. Cave ins would be likely and Disney would be a fool to risk something like that. Not to mention all of the other problems like extending piping and electricity underground, keeping the mice and other pests out, etc.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

                    But backstage could go under ground like at Magic Kingdom in FL

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                    • #11
                      Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

                      It would be possible but not practical. Aside from the cost probably the biggest issue would be emergency evacuation. The main level of an underground “land” would have to be maybe 40 or 50 feet down otherwise the ceiling would feel too low for that size of space. Imaging having to evacuate up five flights of stairs.


                      What might be more practical is to build a “land” on top of another with the lower level having at or near ground level access. The upper “land” would be essentially a roof top park.


                      A totally enclosed “land” would have some pretty interesting design questions, like would the ceiling be themed as sky or would it be subterranean. If sky, would it bethe same time all day or track the “real” world outside. Would they use artificial trees or real trees and some grow lights so they would get some sun. It would be like one gigantic show building. One advantage would be that there would be little chance for the outside world to intrude into this “land”.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

                        The Mermaid Lagoon at Tokyo Disney Sea comes to mind.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

                          Apart from subs/Autopia mentioned above, DL's Space Mountain sits in a 15-foot deep hole to keep its height within reason. Its copy at TDL is "taller" because it was constructed without going below ground.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

                            I'd be scared to be underground with that many strangers. If something did go wrong I'd be concerned about a chaotic stampede. Not that I don't think of that on other rides as well.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Could an Underground "Land" Work in the Landlocked Disneyland Resort?

                              Originally posted by CaliforniaAdventurer View Post
                              The Mermaid Lagoon at Tokyo Disney Sea comes to mind.
                              It's not technically underground though. The main entrance is located on an elevated area of the park.

                              A better idea could be (and I know I've talked about this before) a ground level indoor land. As long as you could enter the land from inside the park it could then basically be located anywhere outside the berm where there was room for it.

                              Although the most obvious choice would be to just ditch Autopia instead. I get that some kids appreciate it, but it takes up WAY too much space in it's current form. Tokyo's Autopia is like half the size and the park itself is almost twice as big as ours.
                              Last edited by DLcub; 05-23-2013, 06:45 PM.

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