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A Poll: Does Disneyland History matter to you?

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  • CA_Man_In_HI
    replied
    Disneyland history is extremely important to me. People here on the least coast, um, I mean east coast ask me why I'm so much into Disneyland when, from their perspective, WDW seems bigger and better. I tell them that when you go to DL on the best coast, dang!, I mean west coast, it's not just about size and number of attractions. DL has a history that no other Disney park can come close to. Walt created, built, and modified the park. No other park has that advantage. Not to mention that at the time of it's conception, the idea was so radical. All the other parks are clones off DL.
    The other thing to remember, is how important it was to give guests the ultimate expierence. People didn't go to Disneyland just to meet the Disney characters from various films, they went to expierence a form of life outside of their own. They got to live in the Ol' West, the lesser known exotic regions of the world, the fantasy-styled Europe, and of course the future! WED Enterprises (aka WDI) was commited to using the best resources available to turn their creative ideas into the most realistic illusion for guests to expierence. One doesn't ride POTC to just see pirates sack and burn a town, but rather to expierence themselves. A sort of thrill is to be added, as if you yourself were trapped in the burning town being looted by drunken pirates.
    We should look to the history of Disneyland to see how they impressed guests and took them somewhere unimaginable in the 50's and 60's and can do so again. While I wasn't around to see the 50's and 60's, I do expierence a sort of nostaligia when I visit attractions like Tiki and Jungle Cruise. I can imagine what it must've been like to see singing birds, or hear President Lincoln give a speech in a time where nothing like that seemed possible. I use that history as a standard to judge where Disneyland is now, and where it is headed. Winnie the Pooh and Tarazan's Tree House falls short, in my opinion, of Disneyland's potential. I really hope that Matt Ouimet and Bob Iger will look to what made TL '67 so great for 30 years. I then hope that they will take TL and recreate another bright, optomistic future for those of us that live in the early 21st Century. Reliving films with Winnie the Pooh, Buzz Lightyear and Nemo doesn't create any magic; taking us somewhere new, and away from our present lives in a believeable illusion is what creates magic.

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  • travelmom
    replied
    I have never been a southern CA resident but, My dads family lived there so my whole life I got to go to Disneyland. I was born in 59, and my first visit I was 2.
    I watched " The Wonderful World of Color" in the sixties every week, and during the day, all the reruns of Annette and the Mouseketeers, and Spin and Marty. When you come from our generation, you almost felt like you knew Walt. He never just produced shows, he came out and talked to you, giving you the intro for the latest adventure in Living Color. Television itself was still new, and an exciting thing. Even as young child, I realized how special and unique Walt Disney was.
    Its all about the history to me.

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  • Sambo
    replied
    Extremely.

    That's why I subscribe to The "E" Ticket.

    Leave a comment:


  • Radiobarry
    replied
    Disneyland history

    Disneyland, which opened one year before the year I was born, has played a very prominent role in my life. Growing up in Southern California, through my eight years as a "CM", through the times that I've gone back since then, I feel like Disneyland's history is a part of my own. I am proud to have been associated with it.

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  • BigPigletFan
    replied
    Originally posted by hornplayer
    I used to be one who says "keep it like Walt had it" but Walt would not have done that! Wow - what about re-doing Small world? Technology could easily boost that ride to a whole new level! Just some thoughts is all.
    Hmm.. I'm not quite sure about that one. heh. :botox:

    I must agree Disneyland is great. Growing up here in Minnesota I have always considered that "I grew up going to Disneyland" and that is why I love it. My dad lived in SoCal, went there July 21, 1955 for his 8th birthday party, worked there in 1966, and went there with us kids. I have always turned to him with questions gradually as I got older because eventually he didn't always know or remember. But tonight I got a little story about "Adventure to Inner Space" out of him. I love the fact that Disneyland isn't only about it's OWN history, but history that can be passed down. Walt really meant it when he said, "Disneyland is your land" and that he wanted a place for families. It's a place that a family, many miles away, can stop, reflect and care about each and every aspect of it. Why? Because it's magical.

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  • hornplayer
    replied
    History = yes! Nostalgia = right on! Progress = you'd better believe it baby! Walt was a pioneer for many things (AA, ride tech, etc) and I think he would still be on the cutting edge today, maximizing today's and tomorrow's technology to either (1) re-do rides to maximize their potential, or (2) creating bigger and better rides. Walt was always changing things in the park. Look at the Jungle Cruise - it changed from year to year while he was alive, and the shops on Main Street were always changing sponsors, or locales. Let's not forget Tomorrowland, Fantasyland. And, after doing some research I was astonished at how much of Frontierland has gone through changes.

    So, take a ride like Mr Toad for example (which I love). What if technology could totally revamp that ride? I dunno how (not an Imagineer, nor techie) but I am sure there are cutting edge ways of re-doing ANY ride! Wow how fun would it be to take an original ride and take it to another level?

    I used to be one who says "keep it like Walt had it" but Walt would not have done that! Wow - what about re-doing Small world? Technology could easily boost that ride to a whole new level! Just some thoughts is all.
    Last edited by hornplayer; 04-16-2005, 07:15 PM. Reason: spelling

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  • E Ticket
    replied
    The history of Disneyland is important to me, but I am often irked by many Disneyphiles who are all gung-ho on preserving rides.

    I'm all for keeping classic theme park rides so long as they can be modernized and upgraded through the years without damaging the integrity of the show. But I don't want Disneyland to become some sort of ride museum.

    Sometimes an attraction is just beyond it's prime (HISTA, some Fantasyland dark rides) and they should make way for rides that may provide a more immersive atmosphere or greater thrill/enjoyment.

    Too many people like to speak on behalf of Walt Disney and what he enivsioned for the park. I don't think his vision was to keep as many opening day attractions as possible, but to keep up with the latest and greatest (as seen in the 1959 Tomorrowland expansion) to maximize family enjoyment.

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  • Fantasmico!
    replied
    history is important. it is the quality and originality of the founder that needs to be heeded for the future. now, where is that churro?

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  • crinklebat
    replied
    Super important. Man, the only way I study anything that isn't math or computer science anymore is through reading books about Disney. I recently bought a cultural criticism book on how gays and lesbians relate to Disney products and stories, which is honest-to-god the first cultural criticism book I've ever read. And I would never have read it if it weren't about my favorite company. Similarly, most of what I know about architecture, crowd psychology, economics, corporate governance, fairy tales, advertising, and so on is because of how closely I follow Disney, both past and present.

    So, it's not just the history, it's every aspect.

    And, come on, who among us didn't tear through DisneyWar the second it came out? I will admit that I put it off a week or two because of finals - but seriously, the morning after finals I was in the airport with that big honkin' book in my hand. Disney history is just so much fun!

    Leave a comment:


  • robotpirates
    replied
    Somewhat important.. okay. You know what, thinking back. I voted wrong. Gah! Oh well.

    My boyfriend and I are Disneyland fanatics, especially in history. We soak up that stuff like sponges.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nephythys
    replied
    No, sometimes you not only stand in the way, you lay yourself down in front of the bulldozer and say "OVER MY DEAD BODY!"

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  • sir clinksalot
    replied
    I think the history of Disneyland is important. But not at the expense of the future.

    I guess what I mean is we should never stand in the way of progress, even if it means that something we love needs to be changed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nephythys
    replied
    I really can't see anyone here saying it's not important.

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  • jurgenb52
    replied
    history is it.

    I'm graduating with a history degree in 3 months, I wrote a thesis on gender roles and the history of Snow White, Cinderella, and Sleeping Beauty. I want to apply to be an archivist with the company, and to me it is such a crucial part of Disneyland. It's history is what we are celebrating this year, 50 years of making magic and memories... It wouldn't be as cool if it were 2 years old this year, its because of everythign Disneyland has come to mean to us now, and what it means to our past that makes it special.

    My many memories of visiting Disneyland are why I love it so much. If I had never been there and seen changes and developments of this living breathing thing, it would be like any other place.

    "We may be through with the past, but the past ain't through with us."
    -PTA

    Leave a comment:


  • wonderful world of Disney
    replied
    for me it's like how can you love something if you don't know where it came from the past is important to guide the future.

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  • TinkPink
    replied
    The history of Disneyland is the main thing that sets it apart from all other theme parks, even other Disney theme parks, IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • felixthequick
    replied
    disney history is very important to me. my uncle opened the park and retired after building splash mountain. he met my aunt working at disneyland, my aunt was part of the disneyland choir for about 25 years, my other aunt worked at disneyland 41 years, she was the lead seamstress. they all have pictures of what they have done over the years. there is a picture is specific that i love where all three of them are taking a picture with the abominible snowman from the matterhorn. they also have pictures with the animals from the jungle cruise and they are all part of the disney hall of fame. my uncle has pictures with both walt disney and michael isner. there names are ray parish, josephine parish and adelina ortiz. i hope when i graduate in electrical engineering i can continue the legacy. my aunt adelina was the last to retire back in oct of 2002. i need to work really hard to get a job there in imagineering so that i can continue the tradition in my family. working there would be a dream come true.

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  • wolfy
    replied
    Since joining Micechat I have really turned into a Disney Fanatic (more so than before)! Just thought I might start studying the History of Disney, some on the internet, some at the library, and then of course I'm planning on purchasing some books, CD's and DVD's sometime here in the near future. I was born and raised here in Orange County, so Disney has always been part of my life. I think it might be an interesting subject to look into......I've learned so much from these forums that's it's kinda hard not to follow up some more!

    Leave a comment:


  • Barbaraann
    replied
    I used to stay up late at night with my grandson and watch Vault Disney. Now I wish that I would have taped the shows. I taped a lot of Zorro episodes, but I should have taped the Mickey Mouse Club episodes of Spin and Marty and the Hardy Boys. History is important, but we are also making history now, as we speak.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevie
    replied
    I love Disneyland history. Any Disney park, I DRAIN the internet of all info on any pasty attractions. I never can get enough. Thus, my late nights.

    Leave a comment:

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