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  • DL - Too Accessible For Many?

    "America is the only country that went from barbarism to decadence without civilization in between." Oscar Wilde

  • #2
    I know exactly what you mean... The rides don't have the same feeling after I've ridden them a lot. I only get to go about twice a year, but even that much still feels like to much. But I'll never stop loving it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Our family of six makes three (sometimes four) week-long trips per year. Each trip coincides with birthdays, holidays, etc...(and we are in Northern CA)

      We fully enjoy the Parks each time that we go. Yeah, we have our "routine" set up and sometimes it's nice to change things up a bit. But until we hear from the kids differently, we will continue our pace. Our oldest is 13 and still says DL is his first choice for a trip.

      We also go to LegoLand, Knott's and Universal along with DL, so maybe that helps break things up a bit. And we still find it fun to cruise through Hollywood looking for stars, and also enjoy Marina Del Rey and Santa Monica. Heck, we have even eaten at Arnold's restaurant there.

      Even after the kids leave the nest, we plan to enjoy the Parks with just the two of us. And when the grandkids start coming...it all starts over again.

      Comment


      • #4
        I go a couple times a week, but I never get "bored"... I generally go just for two or three hours to people watch or walk around in the shops. I might get on two rides max in that time. And it's never boring, because I soak it up like a wide-eyed child every time.

        Sometime between when I enter the main gate and walk under the bridge, I go from an 18 year old college student to a giddy eight year old visiting the park for the first time--- except I know where everything's located.

        Never get bored of Pirates or Haunted Mansion or Big Thunder or Matterhorn or Star Tours or Jungle Cruise or the Tiki Room... I guess I could list all the attractions, but you catch my drift.

        When people report things here, I don't go to check out negative things like chipped paint, but I'll rush to the park to see the new paint job on Innventions (which I did!) or to check out PUSH. I've never noticed any negative things about the park until I see them pointed out on this forum and others in the "disneyphile" community.

        Maybe it's just because I rarely get to Toontown, but I never noticed the state of disrepair that Goofy's Bounce House was in before it was posted about between here and/or Mouse Planet. I just don't SEE the bad things.

        And when I rode the DLRR and the train slowed to an almost-stop between Critter Country and the Toontown station, I thought it might be because there was some sort of animal on or too close to the tracks, or that an engine had temporarily crapped out.

        I don't think I CHOOSE to not see the bad things, I simply DON'T see them. DIsneyland is magic and perfect and makes me happier than anything else. Well, other than going home afterwards to share a bed with my SO!
        Member of the Disney Class of 2005
        Disneyland CM for 4 years.
        May 6, 2005 - present.

        Comment


        • #5
          What a great question, desertdweller. When I was a kid we only went to Disneyland once every one or two years when we could afford it. Now as an adult its a different story entirely.

          I've been through a few different phases since I got my first AP probably 8 years ago, but the one that has never changed is how Disneyland went from being a hectic amusement park ("Oh my gosh, I've been here 5 hours and I've only ridden 3 rides!"), to a real "park". I told this to everyone I persuaded to buy an AP and they never believed me until they had that magical plastic card in their own hands. Suddenly, instead of being so frenzied in trying to get your money's worth out of the day, Disneyland actually became a relazing experience; the world inside the park slowed down and you were able to better enjoy the details, the hidden gems.

          I did go through a stage where I started noticing the neglected maintenance, but looking back perhaps it was because there was so much neglect. It was hard not to notice it. Nowdays, its hard not to notice all the loving attention given to the place; even more credit to CM Matt. Gotta love that man.

          Now, going to the park is different depending on who I'm with. Sometimes its just to revel in the atmosphere, or to read a book in the Plaza Inn over dinner while I wait for traffic to die down after a business meeting nearby. Other times its because its a great place to spend time with special people. Or simply because I need some Disney Magic. But every trip is special and memorable in some way, and everyone in my family still thrills at the thought of going.

          Too much of a good thing? I think that depends on your attitude, and whether you tend to see the glass as half-empty or half-full.

          Comment


          • #6
            Well, I am a Cast Member and I work in TDA. For me, it feels like I never get out into the park at all, and when I do, it's almost always as a guest.

            There is something to be said for working at DL and yet not working there. Don't worry, I haven't forgotten that I work for a theme park and I haven't forgotten that the magic awaits just steps from my office. I love where I work, and it allows me to work at DL and still go into the park every week or two as guest with my wife, and have a wonderful, magical experience. It's the best of both worlds, I work there, I play there and I never get tired of either one!

            Ultimately, I feel if I limit my trips, I might forget that I work for the best theme park in the world. I don't want to end up like some of my coworkers, who live on their own little TDA planet. They never venture into the parks for work and most certainly would not venture there for play either. In this case absence does not make the heart grow fonder, it makes it indifferent.

            I guess I feel differently about APs than Kevin or Al. So I say go to Disneyland as much as you'd like! Go now, go often! It's totally OK to care about all the little details(good and bad), like hidden Mickey's and maintenance issues. Obsessed guests (the millions and millions that visit every year) are what keep Disneyland glowing, growing and going strong.

            Fight the indifference.
            ~ Tasty, yet morally ambiguous! ~

            Comment


            • #7
              Very interesting question. As someone who just got my first AP on Friday, I feel that I'm in a pretty unique position to answer.

              See, I've always been a Disneyland "power user". I tried to go at least once (and generally more like twice) a year throughout high school. It was pretty much the only major thing I ever spent money on, and I paid full price for admission every single time. In the first year and a half of college, I did the same. I was one of those freaks who would be there in line half an hour before Mickey & Friends opened, knew all the networked and non-networked FastPasses by heart, packed a lunch, carried water, etc. On a few trips I even left my family to eat a sit-down lunch and got on a few rides while munching a peanut butter sandwich I packed at home...I couldn't bear the idea of sitting down at DL.

              My boyfriend finally talked me into getting an AP because he can't handle the long days. He's fine with being at the parks for a few hours in the evening, but he just can't do the 16-hour marathons I can, both physically and mentally. So we went Friday night and bought AP's, and for the first time in my life, he convinced me to sit down for half an hour so we could get a decent spot for Fantasmic!...and then on Sunday, we did dinner at the Vineyard Room, which took several hours. This sort of thing was unheard of for me...what happened to getting one's money's worth?

              At this point, I love every minute I spend in DL, but staying there for a few hours feels deeply weird to me. I am having huge trouble getting out of the mindset of "Okay, it's rope drop - give me your ticket and I'll run and FP Splash Mtn and meet you in Tomorrowland. Go go go!!!!!" It doesn't feel right that I went to DL twice this weekend and never got on Indy or POTC, you know? And I know that I can go back anytime and not pay...but I'm having a really big problem processing it. I still don't know if I like it or not.

              Since I don't have a car, though, my BF is responsible for getting me there and back - and I guess this is a good compromise for now. But for the time being, I kind of prefer DL as a day-long, intense experience. There is just something about seeing Sleeping Beauty Castle in the early morning light and in all its night-lit splendor that makes you feel like the place is more real and magical than just going for a little segment of the day.

              In the end, though, I'll take a trip to DL no matter what. It's my laughing place.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by crinklebat
                Very interesting question. As someone who just got my first AP on Friday, I feel that I'm in a pretty unique position to answer.

                At this point, I love every minute I spend in DL, but staying there for a few hours feels deeply weird to me. I am having huge trouble getting out of the mindset of "Okay, it's rope drop - give me your ticket and I'll run and FP Splash Mtn and meet you in Tomorrowland. Go go go!!!!!" It doesn't feel right that I went to DL twice this weekend and never got on Indy or POTC, you know? And I know that I can go back anytime and not pay...but I'm having a really big problem processing it. I still don't know if I like it or not.

                Since I don't have a car, though, my BF is responsible for getting me there and back - and I guess this is a good compromise for now. But for the time being, I kind of prefer DL as a day-long, intense experience. There is just something about seeing Sleeping Beauty Castle in the early morning light and in all its night-lit splendor that makes you feel like the place is more real and magical than just going for a little segment of the day.

                In the end, though, I'll take a trip to DL no matter what. It's my laughing place.

                I think this is one of the most interesting posts I've ever read. There is so much feeling in this and great expression of what the difference is when you can have somehting anytime you want and for different lengths of time. APs are like Tivo.
                "As usual he's taken over the coolest spot in the house"- Father re: Orville 1963

                [FONT=Arial Narrow]

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                • #9
                  I agree Cousin O!

                  SpeederScout also brought up some interesting points in his post about the changes he felt about the park and being able to simply appreciate it as such when he acquired an AP. Something I had never given much thought about.

                  And yours was a wonderul post, Crinklebat! :bow:
                  "America is the only country that went from barbarism to decadence without civilization in between." Oscar Wilde

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When I was visiting the park in the 80's and 90's, they had Annual Passes. I remember computing back then that it would take 5 visits to the park to make up for the annual pass. Since I lived in Northern California, I only visited about 4 times a year, and felt it would be too much of a gamble to buy it. I don't remember if they had different levels of passes back then, though. I just remember the annual pass being advertised on the ticket booth.

                    This was before DCA, of course, and even before Disney Stores... so it's quite a while back.

                    Now I live in Southern California, and as my wife will attest to, I live for God, Family and Disneyland, in that order (although she might be tempted to switch the last two). The pass is a HUGE chunck out of our wallet (especially when we buy the 3 year old's at full price!) but a Premium for me is simply a must. I just go too often, and would severely miss it without being able to 'pop over' for a couple hours after work to de-stress. I work in an extremely stressful job, in Anaheim, so getting there to cool off is a Godsend in itself.

                    My wife knows this, and has often said that as far as vices go, while this one is expensive in one chunk, there are far worse things I could be addicted to. With all the walking I do in the parks, it's probably even pretty good for me!
                    ---------------------------------------------


                    a walk around the park... Star Tours, Nemo, Fantasyland, Frontierland, DCA... and more!


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by desertdweller
                      And yours was a wonderul post, Crinklebat! :bow:
                      Aww, thanks desertdweller and Cousin O! I'm glad this thread provided me with a place to get my conflicted feelings about my unprecedented access to DL out in the open.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I grew up in Minnesota and so a trip to a Disney park (Disneyland or Walt Disney World) was a huge deal in my family, we would go every few years maybe. I moved to So Cal a few years ago and one thing that I immediately wanted to do was get an AP for Disneyland, I didn't however, I went a few times just during my first year and it was always a rushed hectic experience that we had to go on as many rides as possible. I've had an AP for a year and a half now and I love just going to the park on my own or with a friend or two and not have the pressure of needing to get on the Matterhorn or POTC. Like Speederscout pointed out, I've been able to enjoy it for all the little things that I had never slowed down long enough to notice. My work schedule often has me work seven days a week and often until later at night throughout the school year and so I'm not always able to dedicate a full day to the park, so for me I love taking off after work and getting a couple hour dose of Disney on the days I can. So in a way it is still a special time for me to be able to enjoy the park, it's just more frequent.

                        ErikAnders.smugmug.com

                        Fratsor Brother - ΔΜΧΑ


                        1519, 4066, 423, 600, 2469, 378, 5044, 888

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                        • #13
                          I try to get down once a year (my friends think I'm weird). Being in Canada, it is a big investment. Thankfully I have good friends in Anaheim who I stay with now.

                          Disneyland is always special for me. I rarely go anywhere "touristy" here, and doubt I'd tire of DL if I lived in CA. I'm one of those people who just likes to walk around, and take in the atmosphere... the magic. It's home!
                          They need to put the smell of POTC in an aerosol can that I can buy!

                          I worked at a Disney Store for 8 years (1994-2002). Even while a Cast Member, the place was special. But I sure do miss free admission and discount privileges!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            One does not need to hit the rides as fast as possible or try to fit every attraction into every visit. If I do not desire to ride I may just stroll through main street. It is not very often that I can have a walk through an early 20th century town with a barbershop quartet or a small band of brass playing firemen? I can go to new orleans square, hang out on a bench and enjoy some live music in the park and the steam whistle of a passing locomotive. I can climb aboard an 18th century man-o-war for a pleasant cruise. There are plenty of ways to enjoy the park other than rides. That is what separates it from a thrill ride park. Buying an ap lets us have a getaway from southern california living and lets us experience an alternative, and I might say, superior era.
                            How much longer will it take
                            For the world to see.
                            We should learn to live
                            And simply let it be.
                            Bloodstone, bloodstone.

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                            • #15
                              When I was a kid, a trip to Disneyland was a major deal! Once every two or three years. When we went, there was so much pressure to do everything and get your money's worth. Now my girlfriend and I have APs. We travel between Los Angeles and San Diego often. It's so nice to be able to just "drop in" to Disneyland... maybe for only a couple of hours... and not feel the pressure to have to do everything! Sometimes, we hardly even ride a ride. Just being there is special. Other times we really do it up. Having an AP gives you the freedom to decide. Sometimes, the park can seem a bit "familiar" but it is so dense with detail that you can keep yourself entertained by wandering off the beaten path. Can you do everything there is to do in one day? two? three? We've also had many fun hours in DCA. We make about four or five visits per year... and haven't been bored yet.
                              "Yesterday, a man walked up to me and said, 'Isn't it a shame that Walt Disney couldn't be here to see this?' and I said, "He did see this, that's why it's here."
                              -Art Linkletter July 17, 2005-


                              When you wish upon a star your dreams come true.

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                              • #16
                                I don't think it's just the APs who are obsessed over every little detail of the park. Disneyland tends to evoke a very personal feeling in its fans and even if you haven't been to the park in a decade, it still stings to know that the park's quality has degraded. I haven't been to the park since 2002, despite living in SoCal an being a major Disneyland fan, but I read Al's column like gospel to see what Disneyland has changed in the past week.

                                I have been to Disneyland dozens of times after going since I was less than a year old. Each time has always been incredible because it's not the attractions that make Disneyland special, it's the guest treatment that makes you feel like you're a part of something special that makes Disneyland unique. And nostalgia plays a big part too since a lot of the park hasn't changed one bit in 50 years. When you look back with pictures or memories of special moments in Disneyland, you can go back to the same exact spot and see exactly where those moments took place. I've always found it incredible to see pictures of Walt Disney standing in an area of Disneyland that looks identical today as it did in 1966, it almost feels like the picture was taken yesterday! So I'd say the more you go to the park and build more memories, the more incredible it is to visit.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by speederscout
                                  What a great question, desertdweller. When I was a kid we only went to Disneyland once every one or two years when we could afford it. Now as an adult its a different story entirely.

                                  I've been through a few different phases since I got my first AP probably 8 years ago, but the one that has never changed is how Disneyland went from being a hectic amusement park ("Oh my gosh, I've been here 5 hours and I've only ridden 3 rides!"), to a real "park". I told this to everyone I persuaded to buy an AP and they never believed me until they had that magical plastic card in their own hands. Suddenly, instead of being so frenzied in trying to get your money's worth out of the day, Disneyland actually became a relazing experience; the world inside the park slowed down and you were able to better enjoy the details, the hidden gems.

                                  I did go through a stage where I started noticing the neglected maintenance, but looking back perhaps it was because there was so much neglect. It was hard not to notice it. Nowdays, its hard not to notice all the loving attention given to the place; even more credit to CM Matt. Gotta love that man.

                                  Now, going to the park is different depending on who I'm with. Sometimes its just to revel in the atmosphere, or to read a book in the Plaza Inn over dinner while I wait for traffic to die down after a business meeting nearby. Other times its because its a great place to spend time with special people. Or simply because I need some Disney Magic. But every trip is special and memorable in some way, and everyone in my family still thrills at the thought of going.

                                  Too much of a good thing? I think that depends on your attitude, and whether you tend to see the glass as half-empty or half-full.
                                  You, my friend, hit the nail exactly on the head! :bow:
                                  Charlie :wave:
                                  MiceChat User #1037

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I think that the park takes on a whole new meaning when you are an Annual Passholder. It allows you to enjoy the park at your own leisure. For years, I enjoyed the park as an occasional visitor. But when I went, I always had a feeling of being rushed; as if I had to try desperately to make my trip worth the 30 odd dollars. But when I became an AP, I found myself enjoying things that I didn't when I bought a day ticket. For example, I would have never gotten a kick out of browsing Disneyana, and I definitely wouldn't have had the patience to ride the myriad of vehicles on Main Street.

                                    Now that I work at DL, I realize that Annual Passholders tend to sympathize with us Cast Members. They have seen us dealing with guests demanding free stuff or asking stupid questions, and they realize that a casual chat could do us good while we endure the sometimes grueling 8-hour shifts.

                                    I for one believe that those AP's that are jaded are this way because of their dual mindset. These AP's are both frenzied tourists AND frequent visitors. When these two things are coupled together, it causes The Happiest Place On Earth to rapidly lose its lustre. Only with a positive, laid-back attitude towards the parks can one continue to enjoy them.
                                    Make something Idiot-Proof, and someone will build a better Idiot.

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                                    • #19
                                      Who'da thunk I'd be an AP!?!

                                      I grew up in OC and when I was young, my entire family would go once a year to D/L. My grandfather's company would pass out tickets for all of their employees and their families, so this was a HUGE thing for us. Once I grew up, I got a job there straight out of high school. That was a big thing for my family, they loved the fact that I worked there and could sign them in for free!
                                      When I worked there, I used to go in whenever I wasn't working and ride my most favorite rides. Me and my friends would dodge all of the guests to get from ride to ride as quickly as possible. And we knew all the ins and outs of every nook and cranny of the place. Doing this really made me not appreciate the park as much, some of the magic was gone. Especially since I knew what everything looked like from the other side. Oh yeah, and I totally detested APs! (I worked in Disneyana and the Gallery so I got to see the best APs ever!)
                                      After I quit, I stopped going to the park, too many bad jujus for me. I didn't go for a good 8 or 9 years. But, now that I am married and I have a 2 year old, D/L resort is the greatest place to go for free. We got APs as a gift, we now go at least 3 times a month and we just renewed and upgraded to premium for the 50th celebration.
                                      I now take it very slow and it is actually alot more fun when you go and see it through the eyes of a child. I try not to see the bad although sometimes my inner castmember comes out and I say things like, "they need to fix that" or "I can't believe that castmember just did that".
                                      I have talked my father, sister, mom, her boyfriend and my mother-in-law to all buy passes as well. I do get others asking me to give them a "guided" tour but most of the time I decline. I like to enjoy the place as if I never worked there.
                                      I especially enjoy going to DCA and hanging out at the Ariel's bar place with my friends from my job. LOL! We send our husbands off with the kids to ride the rides while we drink! that's so great!
                                      So I personally, try not to let it get too old. I enjoy my AP and find it to be a blessing to have when I am broke but am looking for somethingf or my family can do on the weekends.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        if you can go whenever you want, why not?

                                        it seems as tho some people just dont want others to have a good time

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