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Disneyland and the English Language

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  • Disneyland and the English Language

    Kind of an obscure thread title, I know. Don't know if this has been done before, but can you think of any words that originated at Disneyland and have now become part of our everyday language? In our newspaper today, they are talking about adding a People-Mover to get people from place to place. That's what got me started. I can think of some others, can you?
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  • #2
    Re: Disneyland and the English Language

    The other day I asked someone how they were doing and they said,
    "Pretty good, show us your bum."

    That's from Disneyland.
    St. Elizabeth, Patron Saint of Themed parks. Protect us from break downs, long lines, and used gum. Amen.

    "Dance like it hurts, love like you need money, and work when people are watching" - Dogbert




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    • #3
      Re: Disneyland and the English Language

      Imagineer. I remember reading somewhere that this word is actually now accepted in dictionaries.
      Stalking is when two people go for a long romantic walk together but only one of them knows about it.

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      • #4
        Re: Disneyland and the English Language

        Originally posted by thejoshualee View Post
        The other day I asked someone how they were doing and they said,
        "Pretty good, show us your bum."

        That's from Disneyland.
        OK, phrases and idioms can be included as well. BTW, where is this from?
        sigpic

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        • #5
          Re: Disneyland and the English Language

          Sally Ride, the first woman in space, once up in spacesaid: "Have you ever been to Disneyland? This is definitely an E ticket!"

          Every park I've been to, if they have a spinning type ride you sit in, we call it the "Tea Cups".




          Jeff made me famous!
          From the Mouth of the Mouse.

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          • #6
            Re: Disneyland and the English Language

            Gwen Stefani says that she's "living the E-ticket dream" in one of her new songs.

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            • #7
              Re: Disneyland and the English Language

              I'm not sure this is what you mean but I believe Disney started everyone using the terms 'Cast Member' and 'Backstage' (to name just a couple) when talking about a work environment...


              Cool thread topic.

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              • #8
                Re: Disneyland and the English Language

                How many times have I heard the phrase, "you are living in a Fantasyland, if you think that?" Or variations wherein.

                As for Disney, the term "Mickey Mouse" is sometimes used for 'fooling around with.' As in, "he's just Mickey Mousing you around with that idea."

                Some of the things I've heard.

                Yes, a very cool thread!

                Peace,
                Roo
                husband, petowner, wordsmith, imagineer, martialist, playwright, traveller, ardent, wit, critic, barista, Taoist, superhero, fortuneteller, reader, fidget, teacher, dreamer, author, blogger, ghosthunter, voter, patient, bear, gourmand, Floridian, friend

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                • #9
                  Re: Disneyland and the English Language

                  Disneyana is an official term on ebay and is a sub-category for searches




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                  • #10
                    Re: Disneyland and the English Language

                    Animatronics

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                    • #11
                      Re: Disneyland and the English Language

                      Once I was at a restaurant and I forgot something on the upper level so I went up the down escalator and a grumpy lady said, "Where do you think you are, Disneyland????"
                      The daydream princess

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                      • #12
                        Re: Disneyland and the English Language

                        In college I often heard the term "mick class" being used. It was used to describe freshman level courses that were very easy, like a mickey mouse class.
                        The Armenian Genocide

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                        • #13
                          Re: Disneyland and the English Language

                          Yeah, a Mickey Mouse installation (of some sort) is referring to a bad job.

                          Also, what/who came first? The term "goofy" or Goofy the character's name? hehe Example...He's acting goofy!

                          And I prefer to spell it Imaginear. As in Disney Delivears. So why not with it ending with ear?

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                          • #14
                            Re: Disneyland and the English Language

                            Originally posted by roxystar68 View Post
                            Once I was at a restaurant and I forgot something on the upper level so I went up the down escalator and a grumpy lady said, "Where do you think you are, Disneyland????"

                            HAHAHAHA Someone told me that once when I was driving a golf cart around on an event site
                            Three-time MVP Larry Bird, noting that Bryant has been the NBA's premier player for years, told Sports Illustrated's Dan Patrick before this week's announcement, "When someone told me the other day that Kobe hadn't won an MVP trophy, it sort of made me feel like I wanted to throw mine away."

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                            • #15
                              Re: Disneyland and the English Language

                              Originally posted by Gemini Cricket View Post
                              I'm not sure this is what you mean but I believe Disney started everyone using the terms 'Cast Member' and 'Backstage' (to name just a couple) when talking about a work environment...


                              Cool thread topic.

                              Those are great. I think that a lot of restaurant's have adopted a "theme" to be like Disney, but maybe that's just me.

                              Still waiting to here where "Show us your bum" came from. I'm drawing a blank.
                              sigpic

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