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  • RPaul
    started a topic News Space Mountain's coming back!

    Space Mountain's coming back!

    Space Mountain is set to return June 1st. It's back, baby!

    https://disneyparks.disney.go.com/bl...k-this-summer/

  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by Illy View Post
    Disneyland, after all, was built by a man who was going against the grain of the market bandwagon at the time, and was doing something that would push the envelope rather than follow in the footsteps of whatever was the latest craze. All his investors thought he was crazy, and he ended up essentially turning theme parks as a whole from a roadside oddity into an actual industry.

    So yes, it is a tad disappointing when the people in charge of the park forget where they came from.... [snip]

    ....A lot of those folks ARE coming here for "The art and spirit" of it, and all they're getting in return is construction photos of bulldozers flattening the art and spirit out of the park for the next big cross-promotional brand deal.
    Excellent post!

    Leave a comment:


  • deadwinterskies
    replied
    Originally posted by DarthBrett78 View Post
    But wasn't the Rockit Mtn with Hoobastank only for grad nite guests after the park closed?
    That and cast parties.

    Leave a comment:


  • DarthBrett78
    replied
    Originally posted by deadwinterskies View Post

    I count 7:
    1) OG with no music.
    2) Dick Dale doing the Aquarium movement from Camille Saint-Saëns' Carnival of the Animals.
    3) Giaccino orechstral score.
    4) Hyperspace Mountain
    5) Ghost Galaxy
    6) Rockin' Space Mountain featuring RHCP.
    7) Rockit Mountain featuring...... Hoobastank.
    I forgot about Ghost Galaxy!!! But wasn't the Rockit Mtn with Hoobastank only for grad nite guests after the park closed? I guess technically that counts, although I think only 6 have really been open to the public for an extended amount of time.

    If I had to rate the 6 versions from favorite to least favorite - Original with no music, '05 Giaccchino version, '95 Dick Dale version, Ghost Galaxy, Hyperspace Mtn and then finally Rockin' Space Mtn with the RHCP. I like them all, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • deadwinterskies
    replied
    Originally posted by DarthBrett78 View Post
    Funny how many iterations of Space Mtn we have had in only 20 or so years. I count no less than...5?
    I count 7:
    1) OG with no music.
    2) Dick Dale doing the Aquarium movement from Camille Saint-Saëns' Carnival of the Animals.
    3) Giaccino orechstral score.
    4) Hyperspace Mountain
    5) Ghost Galaxy
    6) Rockin' Space Mountain featuring RHCP.
    7) Rockit Mountain featuring...... Hoobastank.

    Leave a comment:


  • DarthBrett78
    replied
    I remember when they added the speakers and the Dick Dale soundtrack in '94/'95ish and I hated it a lot. But it then grew on me and I learned to like it. Then after the '05 refurb they added Giacchino's music and I had to learn to love that as well. lol BUT, as boring as it sounds, I'd love to be able to ride Space Mtn again with no speaker music and just enjoy it the way it used to be. It was more eery and space-like when there was no music I guess. Remember, in space no one can hear you scream (Alien tagline). Funny how many iterations of Space Mtn we have had in only 20 or so years. I count no less than...5?

    Leave a comment:


  • SoraFan1992
    replied
    The Space Mountain Theme Song is Here's to the Future and You. Which is the True theme Song of Space Mountain since 1975 in Orlando. Sing to the Words: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvNeiEn_xMU

    Here's to the future!
    Here's to the future!
    Here's to the future!
    Here's to the future and you!
    It's a world full of color, of perfect harmony.
    A world full of music, a living melody.
    The dreams of tomorrow are beginning today.
    It's a world of discovery, that oncing far away.
    There's knowledge and vision, of spaceships in flight.
    Dimension in sound, achievements in sight.
    So here's to the future, that's coming into view.
    It's a world of living color and pleasure just for you.
    Let your dreams leads the way.
    Leads the way.
    Let your dreams the way.
    Leads the way.
    Leads the way.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blackness
    replied
    Originally posted by Illy View Post

    I wouldn't be so presumptuous as to speak for the entirety of those millenials, but as someone who is a young millenial who's spent perhaps a bit more time than I'm proud of down in the deepest, darkest trenches of modern fandom culture and the black pits of tumblr, I think I can at least speak for a significant fraction of theme-park going millenials when I say this:
    • We hate to admit it, but we are absolutely nostalgia-driven. #tru90skids, the lot of us. We love being able to revisit childhood obsessions and re-examine them through an adult lens.
    • We HATE. HATE HATE HATE the exploitation of art and media for consumerist gain. We get it. Artists gotta put bread on the table somehow. A lot of us are artists and writers and content-producers in some shape or form, and the millenial's economic struggle is something people can write entire books about. At the same time, however, many of us have a strong belief that the media and storytelling world should be driven by the merit of their craft, and that artistic vision being compromised by market trends and number-crunching result in sub-par products (See: The Avatar: The Last Airbender film, as one example out of MANY). If we wanted to look at excel spreadsheets all day, we would have been one of those smart kids who took up a career in a STEM-oriented field. Keep that garbage out of our pretty colors and fancy words. (Side note: STEM kids are great and I love you guys. Please help me calibrate my 3D printer I can't figure out how to level the bed properly)
    • Building off of the above point: Exploitation of Fandom for consumerist gain also tends to be a bit dirty. Again, see the Avatar film as an example. For better or worse (I got the heck out of tumblr culture for a reason, but... Another story for another time), kids my age build communities off of shared interests in the media we consume, and we EXTREMELY dislike when people who do not understand try to force their way in with no greater motive than to make a quick buck.
    • Finally, as a whole: Despite the phenomena of "fandom" seeming to suggest otherwise, millenials are wildly disenfranchised with consumerist culture. Again, has to do a lot with a bunch of socio-economic stuff that ultimately adds up to "Millenials are mostly broke college students who look up to people who made money in the traditionally not-a-goldmine industry of content creation." Good ol' Walt is, by far, the biggest of those idols, going from bankrupting at least a couple different cartoon studios in The Middle of Nowhere, Missouri to becoming the largest Media-producing giant on the face of the planet out of sheer bull-headedness and believing in his own artistic merit and his understanding of his audience when everyone else told him he was an idiot. Yes, Walt was also a shrewd businessman who finally figured out how to make a buck when he came to LA, but he definitely wasn't a traditional businessman making traditional decisions in any shape or form. That's the Disney we all idolize and who's legacy (As grossly cult-of-personality as that sounds) we come to see when we go to the parks, not... Whatever the heck Bob Iger is doing.
    So, Too Long, Didn't Read: Gross, pimply young people who spend all day looking at their phones consist of 50% of Disney's audience, and they already get enough advertisements for Star Wars and Guardians of the Galaxy fed to them by Google Ad Sense. We like to come to Disneyland because it's a place to get away from that garbage, and we end up with our faces stuck in our phones anyway because we finally get here and it's more of the same. (Also, because it makes the older folks here angry and that's hilarious.) Perhaps it's stuck-up and entitled to think that Disneyland should suddenly bend to our will just because our demographic essentially flash-mobbed it in the past 5-10 years (And, after all, isn't "Stuck-up and entitled" the millenial's reputation?), but... A lot of those folks ARE coming here for "The art and spirit" of it, and all they're getting in return is construction photos of bulldozers flattening the art and spirit out of the park for the next big cross-promotional brand deal.
    Same song, different generation, Gen-X'ers have gone through this same cycle.

    Leave a comment:


  • Witeldram
    replied
    It's great to finally be able to hear the classic soundtrack again! I loved Hyperspace Mountain but I really do miss the original ride.

    I don't see Hyperspace Mountain being gone permanently, though. It will probably end up being a seasonal event (much like Ghost Galaxy) to promote future films.

    Leave a comment:


  • RPaul
    replied
    Originally posted by GameNBurger View Post

    To be fair, the last few weekends have looked like classic space mountain lines, plateauing at 50-60 on average.

    I hope disney makes up for the less presence of Star Wars by adding a new segment to star tours from the anybof the new movies. That sort of modularity and variety makes me drool, even if the chronology makes no sense (since it never did anyways).
    Crait, the red dust planet from The Last Jedi trailer, has been confirmed for Star Tours later this year.

    Leave a comment:


  • GameNBurger
    replied
    Originally posted by Blackness View Post
    I think this is well overdue. I wonder though how the lines will be once they change it seems season really packs in the crowds where as traditional SM classic has lesser lines. I would love for then to open up the queu window and put back the glow strips and Dick Dale.
    To be fair, the last few weekends have looked like classic space mountain lines, plateauing at 50-60 on average.

    I hope disney makes up for the less presence of Star Wars by adding a new segment to star tours from the anybof the new movies. That sort of modularity and variety makes me drool, even if the chronology makes no sense (since it never did anyways).

    Leave a comment:


  • Illy
    replied
    Originally posted by AmyandLucy View Post

    You would run it more for the art or spirit of it?

    How would that work since it's a publicly traded company?
    Disneyland, after all, was built by a man who was going against the grain of the market bandwagon at the time, and was doing something that would push the envelope rather than follow in the footsteps of whatever was the latest craze. All his investors thought he was crazy, and he ended up essentially turning theme parks as a whole from a roadside oddity into an actual industry.

    So yes, it is a tad disappointing when the people in charge of the park forget where they came from.

    If you'd like numbers, however, we can always look at PGAV Destination's Voice of the Visitor Report. Less than half of the theme park industry's patrons are families with children under 18, and just about exactly half are young millennials looking to get their fandom on.

    You've probably noticed it in the parks yourself, as well: Walking around, More and more often, less and less of the crowd is composed of 30-40 year old parents pushing strollers, and more and more are young adults in their teens and 20's having a day out with their friends.

    I wouldn't be so presumptuous as to speak for the entirety of those millenials, but as someone who is a young millenial who's spent perhaps a bit more time than I'm proud of down in the deepest, darkest trenches of modern fandom culture and the black pits of tumblr, I think I can at least speak for a significant fraction of theme-park going millenials when I say this:
    • We hate to admit it, but we are absolutely nostalgia-driven. #tru90skids, the lot of us. We love being able to revisit childhood obsessions and re-examine them through an adult lens.
    • We HATE. HATE HATE HATE the exploitation of art and media for consumerist gain. We get it. Artists gotta put bread on the table somehow. A lot of us are artists and writers and content-producers in some shape or form, and the millenial's economic struggle is something people can write entire books about. At the same time, however, many of us have a strong belief that the media and storytelling world should be driven by the merit of their craft, and that artistic vision being compromised by market trends and number-crunching result in sub-par products (See: The Avatar: The Last Airbender film, as one example out of MANY). If we wanted to look at excel spreadsheets all day, we would have been one of those smart kids who took up a career in a STEM-oriented field. Keep that garbage out of our pretty colors and fancy words. (Side note: STEM kids are great and I love you guys. Please help me calibrate my 3D printer I can't figure out how to level the bed properly)
    • Building off of the above point: Exploitation of Fandom for consumerist gain also tends to be a bit dirty. Again, see the Avatar film as an example. For better or worse (I got the heck out of tumblr culture for a reason, but... Another story for another time), kids my age build communities off of shared interests in the media we consume, and we EXTREMELY dislike when people who do not understand try to force their way in with no greater motive than to make a quick buck.
    • Finally, as a whole: Despite the phenomena of "fandom" seeming to suggest otherwise, millenials are wildly disenfranchised with consumerist culture. Again, has to do a lot with a bunch of socio-economic stuff that ultimately adds up to "Millenials are mostly broke college students who look up to people who made money in the traditionally not-a-goldmine industry of content creation." Good ol' Walt is, by far, the biggest of those idols, going from bankrupting at least a couple different cartoon studios in The Middle of Nowhere, Missouri to becoming the largest Media-producing giant on the face of the planet out of sheer bull-headedness and believing in his own artistic merit and his understanding of his audience when everyone else told him he was an idiot. Yes, Walt was also a shrewd businessman who finally figured out how to make a buck when he came to LA, but he definitely wasn't a traditional businessman making traditional decisions in any shape or form. That's the Disney we all idolize and who's legacy (As grossly cult-of-personality as that sounds) we come to see when we go to the parks, not... Whatever the heck Bob Iger is doing.
    So, Too Long, Didn't Read: Gross, pimply young people who spend all day looking at their phones consist of 50% of Disney's audience, and they already get enough advertisements for Star Wars and Guardians of the Galaxy fed to them by Google Ad Sense. We like to come to Disneyland because it's a place to get away from that garbage, and we end up with our faces stuck in our phones anyway because we finally get here and it's more of the same. (Also, because it makes the older folks here angry and that's hilarious.) Perhaps it's stuck-up and entitled to think that Disneyland should suddenly bend to our will just because our demographic essentially flash-mobbed it in the past 5-10 years (And, after all, isn't "Stuck-up and entitled" the millenial's reputation?), but... A lot of those folks ARE coming here for "The art and spirit" of it, and all they're getting in return is construction photos of bulldozers flattening the art and spirit out of the park for the next big cross-promotional brand deal.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by AmyandLucy View Post
    You would run it more for the art or spirit of it?

    How would that work since it's a publicly traded company?
    No offense, your question is based on a false dichotomy (a.k.a. the "false dilemma" logical fallacy). The issue is not a simplistic either-or choice, rather a matter of the Company honestly and accurately defining what is the product it sells and the manner in which it sells it post-Eisner, as opposed to pre-Eisner.





    Leave a comment:


  • RPaul
    replied
    Originally posted by AmyandLucy View Post

    You would run it more for the art or spirit of it?

    How would that work since it's a publicly traded company?
    Well seeing as Disney has been on the New York Stock Exchange since 1957 and Walt Disney ran Disneyland and made motion pictures for the art of it, I think it'll be fine.

    Leave a comment:


  • AmyandLucy
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

    Disney's answers to those four questions are no, no, no; and if not it won't be for lack of trying. Long before SWL's opening, Disney's consumer brand marketing machine will shift into high gear, hyping Star Wars and Marvel via every form of advertisement possible. Every customer, no matter where they are on DLR property, will be subjected to inescapable brand promotion.
    You would run it more for the art or spirit of it?

    How would that work since it's a publicly traded company?

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagleman
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

    Disney's answers to those four questions are no, no, no; and if not it won't be for lack of trying. Long before SWL's opening, Disney's consumer brand marketing machine will shift into high gear, hyping Star Wars and Marvel via every form of advertisement possible. Every customer, no matter where they are on DLR property, will be subjected to inescapable brand promotion.



    The Guess pay for Admission to the parks .....and in return Disney ,
    do a -"" In Your Face Advertisement""......""Over Kill""...... ""Inescapable Brand Promotion""!

    ENOUGH is not ENOUGH, with Disney Marketing ,with Bob Chapek, formerly president of Disney Consumer Products......
    ........Now chairman of Walt Disney Parks and Resorts.............

    Leave a comment:


  • Greg Lee
    replied
    Originally posted by RPaul View Post

    Will nothing quench a Star Wars' fan thirst for more Star Wars? Is Star Tours not enough? Is Star Wars land not enough? Must we overlay every attraction with Star Wars?
    I'll be that guy and say I wish if any theme they could have picked to overlay their parks with I wish it was Star Trek instead. At least Star Trek for Tomorrowland and then the separate SWL by itself.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by RPaul View Post
    Will nothing quench a Star Wars' fan thirst for more Star Wars? Is Star Tours not enough? Is Star Wars land not enough? Must we overlay every attraction with Star Wars?
    Disney's answers to those four questions are no, no, no; and if not it won't be for lack of trying. Long before SWL's opening, Disney's consumer brand marketing machine will shift into high gear, hyping Star Wars and Marvel via every form of advertisement possible. Every customer, no matter where they are on DLR property, will be subjected to inescapable brand promotion.

    Leave a comment:


  • RPaul
    replied
    Originally posted by Kaimanahoolaulea View Post
    Eh, can't wait till they bring the hyperspace theme back.
    Will nothing quench a Star Wars' fan thirst for more Star Wars? Is Star Tours not enough? Is Star Wars land not enough? Must we overlay every attraction with Star Wars?

    Leave a comment:


  • LangenFox
    replied
    The original Space Mountain is going to be back, baby! I miss the classic iconic attraction and I can't wait to ride through space again.

    Leave a comment:

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