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Interesting Facts about the design and structure of disneyland?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Mr. P View Post
    the old Frito-Lay cafe (can't remember the name)
    Casa de Fritos.

    ---
    Once Upon a Time, in Anaheim... Anaheim, California...

    DLR 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2008, 2012 & 2013 with 2015 later this year...

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    • #17
      Originally posted by GameNBurger View Post

      Which is interesting, given it's a half mile walk to
      get from the entrance to the hub I believe, since it's about the same distance as the Indy que (which is a half mile itself), so if this desire wasn't dropped early on, then the only way for Walt to get what he wanted was to have guest make a u turn st the hub .

      Disneyland is built with forced perspective, mostly because Disneyland was built and designed by set designers, where building full buildings to scale for film purpouse would be a gross waste of money.

      Disneyland was also designed in bifurcated fashion as well, despite the hub design. Fantasyland and frontierland weren't connected initially, so frontierland would flow into adventure land at both the entrance and the rivers, while fantasyland and tomorrowland connected via around holiday hill (the site of the Matterhorn).
      It's not a half mile from the entrance to the hub. It's maybe a quarter mile at most, probably even less than .2 miles. Same with the Indy queue. A half mile is really far, even from Splash to Autopia probably isn't a half mile. The parks feel much bigger than they actually are.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by RobertaME View Post

        If you look carefully the scale actually reduces and the buildings get slightly shorter the closer you get to the hub, which is why looking up the street at the castle looks far away while looking down the street toward the train station looks closer.
        This actually isn't true at all, and is likely a corruption of the use of forced perspective that actually is used, as you explained earlier. If you look at photos or drawings of the four blocks of Main Street, you will see that each "building" varies in height, and do not "shrink" as they get closer to the castle. Here's one block, for example: Click image for larger version  Name:	Main-Street-USA-Rendering-Disneyland.jpg Views:	1 Size:	70.5 KB ID:	8511811



        You can see that the Market House, at mid-street on the left, is actually the tallest building on the block.

        Nor does the street get any narrower towards the Castle, as any aerial view will show.
        Last edited by Right Down Broadway; 05-19-2017, 11:32 AM.

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        • #19
          From the turnstiles to the hub entrance is 889 feet or about 0.17 miles. From there to the entrance of Indy is about another 889 feet for a total of 0.34 miles. (OpenStreetMap is your friend! :^Þ )

          Edit:
          Originally posted by Right Down Broadway View Post
          This actually isn't true at all, and is likely a corruption of the use of forced perspective that actually is used, as you explained earlier. If you look at photos or drawings of the four blocks of Main Street, you will see that each "building" varies in height, and do not "shrink" as they get closer to the castle. ...

          You can see that the Market House, at mid-street on the left, is actually the tallest building on the block.
          Yes, the building tops are varied and the second story levels are even with one another, but the ground rises over 2 meters from Town Square to the Hub and then drops back down again by 2 meters as you approach the foot of the Castle. Because your eye looks at the difference between the building heights and the ground it forces you to see them as taller in town square. (the 2nd floor comes slightly closer to the ground as the ground rises)
          Last edited by RobertaME; 05-19-2017, 11:46 AM.
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          Once Upon a Time, in Anaheim... Anaheim, California...

          DLR 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2008, 2012 & 2013 with 2015 later this year...

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          • #20
            Originally posted by RobertaME View Post

            Yes, the building tops are varied and the second story levels are even with one another, but the ground rises over 2 meters from Town Square to the Hub and then drops back down again by 2 meters as you approach the foot of the Castle. Because your eye looks at the difference between the building heights and the ground it forces you to see them as taller in town square. (the 2nd floor comes slightly closer to the ground as the ground rises)
            Wait, what?? The second floor comes slightly closer to the ground as the ground rises?? That makes no sense.

            Out of the hundreds, perhaps thousands, of books written about Disneyland, Disney and Imagineering, you will not find one single reference to any so called "forced perspective" in a linear manner along the length of Main Street--because the imagineers did not design it that way. Any perceived linear forced perspective is purely coincidental. However, you will find myriad references to the vertical forced perspective employed, which is easily discernible.

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            • #21
              It's something I notice when going up MS versus down it toward the exit when I'm in my wheelchair. Because I use a manual chair, I tend to notice even a slight grade as it changes the difficulty. Leaving is slightly easier than entering, even when I'm starting the day fresh and leaving it with tired arms. (the chair also coasts farther leaving than entering... a dead giveaway)
              ---
              Once Upon a Time, in Anaheim... Anaheim, California...

              DLR 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2008, 2012 & 2013 with 2015 later this year...

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              • #22
                Originally posted by RobertaME View Post
                It's something I notice when going up MS versus down it toward the exit when I'm in my wheelchair. Because I use a manual chair, I tend to notice even a slight grade as it changes the difficulty. Leaving is slightly easier than entering, even when I'm starting the day fresh and leaving it with tired arms. (the chair also coasts farther leaving than entering... a dead giveaway)
                Although I don't know the degree, I can confirm anecdotally there is a grade from the Hub to the entrance -- years ago during a heavy rainstorm, I noticed the water flowing down the MS curbs in that direction. I also recall seeing a video and still photos from the early 80s of the nightly fire hose washdown, which proceeded from the Hub to the entrance.
                "With the acquisition of Marvel and now of Lucasfilm,
                Disney may have finally found the grail. You don't need
                imagination or art. All you need is a brand."

                - Neil Gabler

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                • #23
                  Oh, I don't doubt there's a grade--that would be helpful for drainage. But a grade would have no function in any so-called linear forced perspective.

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                  • #24
                    The dimensions of Hollywood Boulevard match those of Main Street, U.S.A., and the height of Main Street Station matches that of Sleeping Beauty Castle.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
                      [T]he height of Main Street Station matches that of Sleeping Beauty Castle.
                      I would need to see some proof on that, and some clarification. Do you mean absolute height, from street level? Sleeping Beauty Castle is 75 feet tall, according to published sources (I'm on page 21 of "Disneyland - The First Quarter Century," but it can be found elsewhere). That's the height of a seven story building.

                      Main Street Station is not even close to that height, unless, perhaps, we include the flag pole and the fact that it's built on a raised platform.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by RobertaME View Post
                        It's something I notice when going up MS versus down it toward the exit when I'm in my wheelchair. Because I use a manual chair, I tend to notice even a slight grade as it changes the difficulty. Leaving is slightly easier than entering, even when I'm starting the day fresh and leaving it with tired arms. (the chair also coasts farther leaving than entering... a dead giveaway)
                        I never would've noticed except for the fact that some lands have the railroad tracks up on a bridge and in others they're almost at ground level, yet you don't feel any change in incline on the ride itself.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Irish Princess View Post

                          I never would've noticed except for the fact that some lands have the railroad tracks up on a bridge and in others they're almost at ground level, yet you don't feel any change in incline on the ride itself.
                          This has more to do with whether the tracks have been "dug under." The Critter Country Trestle, and the tunnels at Toon Town and Main Street, don't show that the tracks rose in elevation. The railroad does have very slight grades, however (for instance, the elevation at Main Street is stated at 138 feet. New Orleans Square Station is six feet higher, at 144 feet).

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                          • #28
                            The Disney Parks Blog is stating that with the railroad coming back, a neat feature will be that, "for the first time ever, the Disneyland Railroad will be making a left-hand turn as it circles the park."

                            This isn't true. When the Park was first built, the back stretch made a very slight left-hand jog–probably not even noticeable as a curve to passenger, but a left-hand curve nonetheless.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Right Down Broadway View Post
                              I'm on page 21 of "Disneyland - The First Quarter Century,"
                              I miss those books. My father has that one and I have "The First 30 Years" and "The First 35 Years". None of the books on the park after that did nearly as good a job of depicting the early years.
                              ---
                              Once Upon a Time, in Anaheim... Anaheim, California...

                              DLR 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2008, 2012 & 2013 with 2015 later this year...

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by RobertaME View Post

                                I miss those books. My father has that one and I have "The First 30 Years" and "The First 35 Years". None of the books on the park after that did nearly as good a job of depicting the early years.
                                I agree. As a kid, much of my summer lawn mowing money went to purchasing those beautiful books. I would read them the next day and relive the previous day, and dream about the trip we'd take back to the Park the following summer.

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