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  • Kat95242
    replied
    I'm glad you enjoyed the book "The 55'ers" too. I'm almost finished reading mine and am enjoying it immensely. I agree with you that it fills in a huge gap in Disneyland History. Thank you David Koenig. I'm going to be a walking encyclopedia on Disneyland History now!!

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  • teacherlady19
    replied
    missed out on the Nickel Tour book. Crazy that it goes for $200+ now on places like eBay. I need to pick a copy up at some point!
    I just checked again. It's difficult to find on the California "Link" service, which is a bunch of libraries that do Interlibrary Loan here in CA. That book, and Inventing Disneyland, are not available for those that may want to read it (but not own it).


    Donna

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  • Right Down Broadway
    replied
    Originally posted by Kat95242 View Post


    I love this topic. I am so excited about David Koenig's upcoming book. It will be Christmas in August for me when my new book arrives! I, too, have a vast library of Disneyland books. A recent favorite is Eat Like Walt, The Wonderful World of Disney Food by Marcy Carrier Smothers. It is rich in history and trivia and beautiful photos. I just finished reading Three Years in Wonderland by Todd James Pierce and found it very interesting and informative. I learned many new things from this treasure.
    I received my copy of David's new book, "The 55'ers." It is amazing. It's almost 300 pages, filled with stories and mini-biographies of over 1,000 people who were employed at Disneyland in 1955. We're talking everyone from the train crews to Trinidad the White Wing to the parking lot attendants and balloon sellers. The shop keepers on Main Street. The ride operators. The Indian Village dancers. The sheer scope of this work is really amazing, and fills in a huge gap in Disneyland history. It's filled with black-and-white photos on every page, nearly every one never-before-published. This is a must-have for aficionados of early Disneyland history, and may make you long for what once was...
    Last edited by Right Down Broadway; 08-06-2019, 04:46 AM.

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  • Eagleman
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

    Thanks, Don! Can't wait!!!
    X2.....I miss the Old Disneyland Hotel

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  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by oldhotelguy View Post
    Got a new book coming out (hopefully) in September: "Disneyland Hotel 1960-1969: The Little Motel Grows Up"
    Thanks, Don! Can't wait!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • oldhotelguy
    replied
    Got a new book coming out (hopefully) in September: "Disneyland Hotel 1960-1969: The Little Motel Grows Up"
    Attached Files

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  • Right Down Broadway
    replied
    I was fortunate to be able to assist David on a few things with this book, including providing contact information for family members from a couple Club-55'ers. I am looking forward to seeing the stories of their loved ones who were there in 1955.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kat95242
    replied
    Originally posted by Right Down Broadway View Post

    Looks like David has an awesome-looking coffee-table book coming out about the folks that created Disneyland in 1955!

    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...led-disneyland

    I love this topic. I am so excited about David Koenig's upcoming book. It will be Christmas in August for me when my new book arrives! I, too, have a vast library of Disneyland books. A recent favorite is Eat Like Walt, The Wonderful World of Disney Food by Marcy Carrier Smothers. It is rich in history and trivia and beautiful photos. I just finished reading Three Years in Wonderland by Todd James Pierce and found it very interesting and informative. I learned many new things from this treasure.

    Leave a comment:


  • DarthBrett78
    replied
    I have a lot of DL and WDW books in my collection, but missed out on the Nickel Tour book. Crazy that it goes for $200+ now on places like eBay. I need to pick a copy up at some point!

    Leave a comment:


  • Right Down Broadway
    replied
    Originally posted by DeadKenobi View Post
    Mouse Tales by David Keoing is my favorite book of all time!
    Looks like David has an awesome-looking coffee-table book coming out about the folks that created Disneyland in 1955!

    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...led-disneyland

    Leave a comment:


  • CASurfer65
    replied
    I just picked up the Nichols book. It's really good. As a total purist and a fan of everything Walt and those who worked by his side, it provides some great photos. Some pictures I have never seen before. The best thing is very little is mentioned about Star Wars Land. It's pushed to the very end with only a couple of pages. Even Indiana Jones and Star Tours get very little air play. It's predominantly vintage. Which is great.

    Leave a comment:


  • waltopia
    replied
    Mmm, hadn’t noticed that silly troll-talk / “reviews”.

    Mind you I am still reading it, but what I did notice, is that ‘Inventing Disneyland’ backs up all the various sources of info from my vast library of books, magazines and articles from a lifetime of research, with exact dates, names and places that round out previously vague stories...like just when and why Walt gave up his beloved Carolwood Pacific Railroad. And why all these art directors from 20thFox were available to work for Walt.

    It takes several recent books just to glean the importance of, and reasons for, the Zorro TV series; the secret commercials created on the Disney lot; the hidden history of his various nieces and the significance of their marriages; how it all relates to Hollywood glamour photography of the 1920s, ETC.

    My own interviews all contain an element I call ‘myth-making’, a human tendency to tell the stories the way you want them remembered. To claim otherwise is the misnomer. I enjoy the ongoing research.

    Leave a comment:


  • Right Down Broadway
    replied
    The Amazon reviews for "Inventing Disneyland" were less-than-stellar...Admittedly there were only four.

    Leave a comment:


  • waltopia
    replied
    Yes, the new Taschen edition by Chris Nichols is spectacularly well done and absolutely beautiful; but I’m now reading a new book which is perhaps the ultimate description of Disneyland origins that has ever been written...really breaking down the detail on who did what, when, and where to truly create the place.

    Inventing Disneyland: The Unauthorized Story of the Team That Made Walt Disney’s Dream Come True.


    by Alastair Dallas (Author) Dec. 2018

    Leave a comment:


  • CASurfer65
    replied
    I've read great things about Chris Nichols' book, Walt Disney's Disneyland, as well. I hear it is almost predominantly focused on the park in its pre-cash grab days of old. So it sounds like the kind of book that would appeal to those of us purists who love the philosophy that embodies the park's founding and the vision of its creator. Not the nouveaux concept of all money, all the time, with as little thought and imagination as possible.

    Leave a comment:


  • Right Down Broadway
    replied
    Originally posted by waltopia View Post
    I am always reading about Disneyland history...and presently one of the books is stunningly good! My library full of materials has not covered as much detail about building the park than...’Three Years in Wonderland: The Disney Brothers, C. V. Wood, and the Making of the Great American Theme Park by Todd James Pierce.‘
    I am in awe of Walt Disney’s perseverance all the more. Hardly an economic motivation...’dreams don’t offer much collateral’...it cost him greatly to get there. (Quit his own company, fractured his families, hocked everything possible including the Studio’s films, got into business with some dirty dealers...lost the land several times, screwed over by various unions during construction, the outright failures of opening day, etc.) No wonder they didn’t have time or money for brass plaques over the entrance tunnels yet.
    I am reading this book now and concur completely. This may be the best book ever written about the construction and opening day(s) of Disneyland.

    Leave a comment:


  • HiddenMickey87
    replied
    Originally posted by oldhotelguy View Post

    I hLooking forward to that, Don!!ave finished the text on my new book covering the 1960's and am now working on the pictures and captions. This decade was so dynamic in the Hotel's history and this book will probably be double the size of my previous editions and triple the amount of photographs. I should have a cover photo for the new book very soon and will share here.


    Disneyland Hotel history: http://www.magicalhotel.com

    Looking forward to it, Don!!

    Has anyone purchased

    -Walt Disney's Disneyland, by Chris Nicholas or
    - Capturing the Magic: A Photographic Celebration of the Disneyland Resort, by Holly Wiencek?

    Those are on my early Christmas list.

    Leave a comment:


  • oldhotelguy
    replied
    Originally posted by whoever View Post

    When are the next books coming out? I have all your printed books. Would love the ones which are e-books only to be published in print.
    I have finished the text on my new book covering the 1960's and am now working on the pictures and captions. This decade was so dynamic in the Hotel's history and this book will probably be double the size of my previous editions and triple the amount of photographs. I should have a cover photo for the new book very soon and will share here.


    Disneyland Hotel history: http://www.magicalhotel.com


    Leave a comment:


  • Right Down Broadway
    replied
    Thanks ajburk97. I'm going to pick some of those up!

    Leave a comment:


  • ajburk97
    replied
    Three Years In Wonderland- Todd James Pierce. A wonderful account of Disneyland's creation, meticulously researched and very well written. Probably the most complete (and accurate) account of Disneyland's creation on the market- many stories I hadn't heard, and many urban legends of that period are laid to rest.

    Secret Stories of Disneyland and More Secret Stories of Disneyland- Jim Korkis. Excellent books consisting of 1-2 page bits of Disneyland facts and history. Fun, easy reads.

    The Myth and the Mouse- Dorene Koehler. Views Disneyland through the lense of a place of ritual. Written by a Ph.D in mythological studies, it discusses Disneyland in a more serious sense- analyzing it as a place of mythology, ritual, and meaning. Excellent read and changes how you view the park.

    Cleaning the Kingdom- Ken Pellman and Lynn Barron. Lengthy (could have probably been a little bit shorter) accounts of two custodial cast members who worked in the 90s-early 2000s. Many cost saving measures of the time are discussed, as well as what the culture and environment was like. Genuinely written by two excellent members of the Disneyland fan community, there's lots of great insight.

    The Unauthorized History of Walt Disney's Haunted Mansion- Jeff Baham. Excellent account of the Mansion's creation.

    It's Kind of a Cute Story- Rolly Crump (as told to Jeff Heimbuch). Not necessarily Disneyland specific- but lots of excellent stories of Disneyland's early years as told by former Imagineer and Disney Legend Rolly Crump.

    Leave a comment:

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