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DISNEY RESPONDS TO CRITICISM FROM ABIGAL DISNEY

Disney has responded to Abigail's recent comments and they can be discussed in this thread - https://discuss.micechat.com/forum/d...neyland-resort
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MICECHAT COMMUNITY RULES

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Will GE make the other lands feel outdated?

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  • #41
    Originally posted by BiggestDisneyFan View Post
    As for keeping a kid off of their phone, it's an uphill battle in any environment, but one would hope that it's not so much at Disneyland. Perhaps propose the idea of playing a game the family can share while waiting in lines. Something like a Disney trivia game would be excellent in that regard.
    I can definitely see the argument here that it would be better to entice guests to remain in the "Disney Bubble" while on their phone in the parks, than switching over to Twitter or Facebook. The Play Disney Parks App, allows for a continual Disney experience for an audience that demands to be on their phones anyway.

    Comment


    • #42
      I think SWGE won't date the other lands as much as the neglect that has happened to them has. Yes it will be a new land with high tech options but it will also looked lived in from day one and as it ages it will look even more authentic as it is supposed to be a outer rim outpost which will not doubt be pretty fairly scuffed and scratched. TL looks dated because it is supposed to be a modern clean efficient world of the future. When it get tarnished it ages dramatically like Toon Town which is supposed to be a cartoon world where trench does not exist.

      Now as far as the App is concerned I do not think the gaming aspect of it brings any benefit and I feel it was a knee jerk response to Pokimon Go and its sudden surge in the attention of a subset of society. I use my phone in the park for Max pass, checking times and taking the occasional photo other then that phone stays in pocket. I even have a response set up on my iWatch that says "Can't chat, I'm at Disneyland with Family I will respond when I get home" So if I get a text I can quickly send this response from my wrist and go about my day at the park. I do feel for people who you seen face buried in there phones for long chucks of time they are truly missing out on real life. Also it is very rude to have them out in Dark rides. I always will speak up and say "Phones Off Please" as it's just not cool to act so entitled to ruin somebody else experience so you can text a friend.

      Comment


      • #43
        Originally posted by MrLiver View Post
        Think of it as having a black and white TV... You can still enjoy the program as you always have, you just miss out on the extra details.
        I think it is more similar to watching in a movie theater versus on your home entertainment system.

        Yes, you get a better experience in a movie theater, but it costs much more, you have to drive there, buy a ticket, park, stand in line, and otherwise make more of an effort than just turning on your TV and starting the movie.

        Most analysts agree that movie theaters have lost some sales to home theaters. The studios collect money from both venues, but not as much from home theater sales.

        Home theater experience is becoming better. With big screens, HDTV, sound systems, earlier access to first run movies. So the gap is narrowing. Some theaters are fighting back with better food, seats, etc., but I do think the relative advantage they used to hold has diminished. I, personally, go out for movies much less frequently than I used to.

        The portion of the experience that is on the guest's smartphone is much easier for non-Disney media companies to compete with in their own product offerings. Disney has less of a competitive advantage with software apps running on smart phones: they have never demonstrated that software was their forte. They are simply not the world leaders in this area that they are in Theme park creation.

        So, if a larger percentage of the "guest experience" will begin to happen in software rather than in the physical park, then Disney will have less of a competitive advantage in this portion of the guest's experience. Let's say that, on average, 50% of the guest's attentional focus in on their smartphone rather than the characters, food, rides and theming around them: then, I would argue that Universal or whomever can supply that 50% of experience equally well if not better. Which means that Disney only has the other 50% to surpass them. And, for some people, maybe it just won't matter as much at some point if Disney can be a bit better in a declining percentage of the overall experience.

        It will take a while before we get there, but we could get to that point for some guests.
        Dumbo rats: the other lovable rodents.

        Comment


        • #44
          Originally posted by whiteness View Post
          ...The portion of the experience that is on the guest's smartphone is much easier for non-Disney media companies to compete with in their own product offerings. Disney has less of a competitive advantage with software apps running on smart phones: they have never demonstrated that software was their forte. They are simply not the world leaders in this area that they are in Theme park creation.

          So, if a larger percentage of the "guest experience" will begin to happen in software rather than in the physical park, then Disney will have less of a competitive advantage in this portion of the guest's experience. Let's say that, on average, 50% of the guest's attentional focus in on their smartphone rather than the characters, food, rides and theming around them: then, I would argue that Universal or whomever can supply that 50% of experience equally well if not better. Which means that Disney only has the other 50% to surpass them. And, for some people, maybe it just won't matter as much at some point if Disney can be a bit better in a declining percentage of the overall experience.

          It will take a while before we get there, but we could get to that point for some guests.
          Well said. The long term danger to Disneyland of becoming generic is that Disney Corp has become generic -- a successful Wall Street media brand acquisition-and-marketing corporation, run by non-creative executives who have no roots in the entertainment business, much less in the vision that created Disneyland. Beyond imitating Harry Potter and Universal's "Ride the Movies," Disney has no vision for Disneyland that Universal couldn't duplicate or top, given sufficient money.

          Disney is raising the bar on brand acquisition and marketing, not on uniqueness and long term creative vision. From buying popular brands to hiring top imagineers, any theme park corporation with sufficient funds could do what Disney is doing -- and do it even better, if they have a creative and visionary executive team. Meanwhile, Disney's executive management, devoid of any top-level creative exec with the same power as Iger's army of marketeers and financiers, remains entrenched in the success of their status quo, and refuses to change.

          Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 03-19-2019, 04:20 PM.
          "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
          it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
          together with every variety of recreation and fun,
          designed to appeal to everyone."

          - Walt Disney

          "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
          - Michael Eisner

          Comment


          • #45
            Originally posted by whiteness View Post
            I think it is more similar to watching in a movie theater versus on your home entertainment system.
            But with the augmented reality app, you get to have both. It isn't an either or decision. It isn't stay home or go to the park. It's go to the park and do X or go to the park and do X and Y.

            ​​​​​​
            Most analysts agree that movie theaters have lost some sales to home theaters. The studios collect money from both venues, but not as much from home theater sales.
            Considering that Netflix surpassed Disney as the most valuable media stock, and there was even talk of Netflix buying Disney before, it isn't outrageous to think that the traditional studio model of content creation is dying. So is it really outrageous to think the traditional theme park experience may be on it's way out too?

            The portion of the experience that is on the guest's smartphone is much easier for non-Disney media companies to compete with in their own product offerings. Disney has less of a competitive advantage with software apps running on smart phones: they have never demonstrated that software was their forte. They are simply not the world leaders in this area that they are in Theme park creation.
            Their competitive advantage in content creation has always been in the stories and character depth they maintain in their roster (their intellectual property). Anyone can build a vekoma coaster, but only Disney can build an Incredicoaster with the Incredibles.As and hat is true for physical attractions, the same holds true for the digital landscape.

            So in the end, the extension into digital doesn't really prove any bigger a disadvantage than the design of physical attractions. They are both tied to the same goals.

            Comment


            • #46
              Originally posted by MrLiver View Post
              As and hat is true for physical attractions, the same holds true for the digital landscape.

              So in the end, the extension into digital doesn't really prove any bigger a disadvantage than the design of physical attractions. They are both tied to the same goals.
              Well, that remains to be seen. And, so far, I haven't seen it. I think there is a real danger that, as the "battleground" shifts from Disney's where strengths and advantages are versus their competition to new technologies and media, Disney may find it harder to justify their premium prices and sometimes less ideal guest experience (crowding, lines, etc.)

              And if the app does become overly important, I personally feel that Disney will diminish my enjoyment of their park, and that's a pity.

              On the other hand, if Disney stumbles, others will pick up the slack. There are a lot of strong competition for our entertainment dollars. And Disney will learn from their mistakes, if any, and recalibrate. So I'm not going to lose any sleep over this.
              Dumbo rats: the other lovable rodents.

              Comment


              • #47
                Originally posted by MrLiver View Post
                Anyone can build a vekoma coaster, but only Disney can build an Incredicoaster with the Incredibles.
                Disney's pathetic use of the Incredibles on a roller coaster is hardly a badge of uniqueness or high standards.

                Your post proves the point that all Disney does is buy brands, buy tech, and hire the wrists to turn the tech into theme park brand-advertisements. Because brands like Star Wars and Marvel are (currently) hot, and the Star Wars Land tech is (for now) cutting edge, Disney can coast along raking in cash -- without laying a foundation of vision for the future of Disneyland.

                But brands fall out of favor with fickle audiences, tech is soon out of date, and imagineers seek employment where they aren't confined to endlessly advertising movie brands (so many have left WDI since the advent of Eisner!). Turning Disneyland into a marketing mall for brands is generating ginormous profits and earning praise from Wall Street at the moment, but it's hardly the kind of long term creative vision that made Disneyland popular in the first place.
                "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                designed to appeal to everyone."

                - Walt Disney

                "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                - Michael Eisner

                Comment


                • #48
                  Originally posted by Armstrong View Post

                  I realize I didn't specify what I meant by outdated. (My bad!)

                  In the podcast they speak about how guests will interact with the physical land at GE. Instead of a wand a la Harry Potter at Universal, the Disney Play app will be the way for guests to interact with the new land.

                  I am curious if folks think this new interactive play will expand to other areas of the park. (Would it work?)

                  GE is a specific story in a specific time and place in the SWU. Would applying that specificity to other areas of the park help with the overall theme? Or is it better to leave the theme vague? Why?

                  Would you (plural you) enjoy being able to explore NOS or Adventureland via the app if it built upon the architecture and attractions that exist?
                  I appreciate the clarification! I think at the present time, the closest we can get to the same level of interactivity is on par with Sorcerers of the Magic Kingdom at WDW. Maybe using an app to activate some interactive elements, but it won't be integrated to the same degree as Star Wars Land. More people on their phones will look even more out of place in places like NOS or Frontierland, but I could see Disney not caring. On the flipside, Disney will only pay money to implement this system if there is some benefit to the guest (and $ benefit to Disney). I don't see small-level integration as being worth it or necessary to improve the atmosphere to the degree that it might be with thematic worldbuilding from a cinematic universe. I don't see anyone clamoring for a way to use their phones to interact with the more timeless lands. At best this tech could be well-utilized in Tomorrowland, so maybe we will see some integration when they finally decide to update it.

                  I could see the opposite being true in the not-so-distant future, though. With new technology popping up every day, it's not difficult to imagine an AR-capable wearable that is transformative for the parks. What comes to mind are the new Focals by North. Though flawed and still in their rudimentary phase, I envision a future where everyone has these on, and Disney park-goers can grant access to Disney's app. How does Disney use it? Well, far from simply translating alien languages, imagine seeing everyone dressed in period-appropriate attire for each specific land, despite everyone actually wearing T-shirts and shorts like they do today. Guests could even customize their outfits for each land to see how they appear to other guests (potential upcharge for premium fashions). Small touches like this could make the parks even more immersive than before. It would only be a matter of time before Disney added full on characters to the lands in digital format. The effect of this technology, like its use in Star Wars Land, should be limited. I would certainly hope that Disney wouldn't use it to replace characters in the parks, though. Nothing can beat the magic of a Disney princess holding hands with a young child walking through Fantasyland or a character improvising with a guest. We aren't yet at the stage where every AI built can pass the Turing test so that's a long ways off, but I could envision Disneyland turning into Westworld if the technology was there and it were cost effective.

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Nah. I go to Disneyland for the nostalgic value mixed with new stuff, so Galaxy's Edge will be something I do to scratch one itch, and the rest of Disneyland will be there to scratch another.
                    "Have I gone mad?"
                    "I'm afraid so. You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret. All the best people are. "

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      Originally posted by BiggestDisneyFan View Post
                      I think the wrong question is being asked, here, over all. The existing lands feel how they do based on their individual natures. Those lands representing times past or stories of fantasy and magic feel 'outdated' compared to the real world, and that is actually part of their magic. The exception to this is Tomorrow Land, which IS supposed to represent the future and fantastic advances in technology and science. With the presence of another land, grandiose in scale and full of futuristic technology and science fiction themes, Tomorrow Land is in danger of feeling like a has-been of a land, even more so than it does now. We can just hope that Disney management decides that the same kind of love that went into building SWGE is what Tomorrow Land needs and it received a large scale transformation with plenty of Imagineering magic.

                      I think the more pertinent question to ask is if SWGE is going to make existing attractions feel dated. The answer to that is yes, but only in the same way that other new attractions have. The Rise of the Resistance and Millennium Falcon attractions are going to seriously raise the stakes on ride experiences, just like Indy, Splash Mountain and Midway Mania did in their time, and Disney will need to keep updating Disneyland's existing attractions to prevent them from feeling too out of date. Some attractions are classics and are still great as they are, but Disney has seen that even classic attractions need to be updated, ala Peter Pan and Snow White, to keep them from getting too stale. The trick is in doing it well and doing it tastefully. Again, Tomorrow Land is suffering from a need to update and/or replace its attractions, much more so than other lands do.
                      Would you argue that guest's smartphone tech need only apply to lands where a tablet device makes thematic sense? (GE TL) Is it thematically incorrect to incorporate into areas set to the past? (MS, AL, NOS)

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

                        Disney's pathetic use of the Incredibles on a roller coaster is hardly a badge of uniqueness or high standards.

                        Your post proves the point that all Disney does is buy brands, buy tech, and hire the wrists to turn the tech into theme park brand-advertisements. Because brands like Star Wars and Marvel are (currently) hot, and the Star Wars Land tech is (for now) cutting edge, Disney can coast along raking in cash -- without laying a foundation of vision for the future of Disneyland.

                        But brands fall out of favor with fickle audiences, .
                        Speaking of fickle audiences, just finished watching ABC outside on the Arizona night patio this Tuesday night....Goldbergs Schooled is having a star wars night, on Blacklish they talk about the philosophy of luke losing his hand and tonight on Jimmy....Mark Hamil....as luke, all in one night, over a 30 minute period....am I missing something today?....other than Disney owning ABC.

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          Originally posted by laferney Road kid View Post
                          am I missing something today?....other than Disney owning ABC.
                          nope... you be catch up
                          just watch ABC
                          lol

                          Soaring like an EAGLE !

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            One way SW:GE is going to clash with Disneyland is the way the CM's interact with you. At the two attractions, there is no "greeter" no "grouper" no "loader" or "unloader" in the traditional sense. No CM in SW:GE is going to say "How many? Row two. How many? Rows three and four." or say "Are you an AP?" and then scan your card for your discount. The CM's will all have themed phrasing to use, and they will not acknowlege that they are operating a ride or working a cash register. At least for the first few weeks, maybe the first summer.

                            Most SW:GE CM's don't expect that to last long, because while some Star Wars fans and AP's might be willing to play along, the average tourist and casual visitor isn't going to know what's happening or how to respond. Guests will be frustrated and it just won't be worth it after the first month or two.

                            Every single day, EVERY SINGLE DAY, any Attractions CM deals with endless Guests who have no idea what Fastpass is, or who think Fastpass costs extra, or who think Fastpass is only for people staying at the Disneyland Hotel. Fastpass has been around for almost 20 years, and a huge chunk of the Disneyland Guest base has no idea what it is, what it costs, or how it works. CM's have been going to stupid TDA executive forums for years, and we always tell the Vice President Du Jour that too many Disneyland Guests have no idea how Fastpass works or even what it is, and the executives refuse to believe it because they think that was a project from like fifteen Fiscal Years ago and surely the entire planet knows what Fastpass is.

                            Even savvier locals have no idea that you need a Fastpass for Fantasmic! and WOC. And when all those same Guests wander into SW:GE, who didn't even check the website to see when the park closes or what Fastpass is, suddenly they are going to be able to understand that they really have to pay close attention to the 30 minute Falcon pre-show in order to operate the ride? And they are going to know they have to run down a hallway to get away from the First Order officers trying to corral them into prison cells and that the CM who opened the trap door in the wall is a First Order double agent who can help them escape?

                            Even if you get educated Guests who know what is happening and what their role should be with the CM interaction, once they leave SW:GE and walk fifty yards into Critter Country they'll go to Splash Mountain and get a grumpy CM barking "How many? Row two! How many? Rows three and four!" and those Guests will be right back into regular Disneyland again.
                            Last edited by Westsider; 03-19-2019, 09:05 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              Originally posted by laferney Road kid View Post
                              ...am I missing something today?....other than Disney owning ABC.
                              Disney makes sure that Disney promotes Disney. And that the promotional message is repeated. Over. And over. And over again.

                              Until audiences are saturated with the brand.

                              "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                              it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                              together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                              designed to appeal to everyone."

                              - Walt Disney

                              "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                              - Michael Eisner

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                Originally posted by Westsider View Post
                                ...CM's have been going to stupid TDA executive forums for years, and we always tell the Vice President Du Jour that too many Disneyland Guests have no idea how Fastpass works or even what it is, and the executives refuse to believe it because they think that was a project from like fifteen Fiscal Years ago and surely the entire planet knows what Fastpass is.
                                Bingo. Just another of the myriad reasons why the joke that "TDA is in Fantasyland" is no joke. And there's little chance it's going to change: Imagine what would happen if a newly-hired or just-promoted-onto-the-bottom-of-the-ladder member of TDA management, who knows how the Park works, tried to speak truth to power.
                                "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                                it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                                together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                                designed to appeal to everyone."

                                - Walt Disney

                                "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                                - Michael Eisner

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  ABC is Disney platform for Disney BRANDS........
                                  From the morning news and into talk shows..........as Mr. Wiggins put it..........
                                  "Until audiences are saturated with the brands""
                                  Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
                                  And that the promotional message is repeated. Over. And over. And over again.


                                  THAT THE TRUTH !......LOL
                                  Last edited by Eagleman; 03-19-2019, 10:11 PM.
                                  Soaring like an EAGLE !

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    Originally posted by whiteness View Post

                                    Well, that remains to be seen. And, so far, I haven't seen it. I think there is a real danger that, as the "battleground" shifts from Disney's where strengths and advantages are versus their competition to new technologies and media, Disney may find it harder to justify their premium prices and sometimes less ideal guest experience (crowding, lines, etc.)
                                    Think of it this way...

                                    Anyone can build a train ride.
                                    Anyone can build a boat ride.
                                    Anyone can build a dark ride.
                                    Anyone can build a spinner ride.

                                    But somehow, when Walt built Disneyland, there was something incredibly special about Casey Jr, the Mark Twain, Mr Toad or Dumbo. They have proven their successes as something above and beyond what their simple foundations would have you believe they are. The argument that "Anyone can build an app," is true, but it ignores the underlying principal that has driven Disney's creative development for decades: their goal is to simply use it to tell the story they want to tell, and it's the STORY that only Disney can tell.

                                    And if the app does become overly important, I personally feel that Disney will diminish my enjoyment of their park, and that's a pity.
                                    Still don't really understand this. You can just choose not to use the app. It wouldn't be any different than refusing to go on the teacups because they make you sick. This vexation against the app itself even being developed, is akin to saying "spinning rides make me sick so Disney should remove all spinning rides from the park." It's mere existence shouldn't impact you in any meaningful way.

                                    On the other hand, if Disney stumbles, others will pick up the slack. There are a lot of strong competition for our entertainment dollars. And Disney will learn from their mistakes, if any, and recalibrate. So I'm not going to lose any sleep over this.
                                    You're right, there isn't any reason to lose sleep. If the app usage doesn't take off, Disney can give up and move on. It really is to everyone's benefit though that Disney pushes the boundaries and still spends the resources to experiment with these new forms of delivery, even if they aren't the type that you personally enjoy.

                                    Comment


                                    • #58
                                      Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

                                      Disney's pathetic use of the Incredibles on a roller coaster is hardly a badge of uniqueness or high standards.

                                      Your post proves the point that all Disney does is buy brands, buy tech, and hire the wrists to turn the tech into theme park brand-advertisements. Because brands like Star Wars and Marvel are (currently) hot, and the Star Wars Land tech is (for now) cutting edge, Disney can coast along raking in cash -- without laying a foundation of vision for the future of Disneyland.

                                      But brands fall out of favor with fickle audiences, tech is soon out of date, and imagineers seek employment where they aren't confined to endlessly advertising movie brands (so many have left WDI since the advent of Eisner!). Turning Disneyland into a marketing mall for brands is generating ginormous profits and earning praise from Wall Street at the moment, but it's hardly the kind of long term creative vision that made Disneyland popular in the first place.
                                      I agree. The line that "only Disney can build an Incredicoaster" is one of those statements that is so absurd you have to assume you're being trolled. Nothing new here.

                                      Unless, only Disney can build it because only Disney owns the rights.

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        Originally posted by MrLiver View Post

                                        Think of it this way...

                                        Anyone can build a train ride.
                                        Anyone can build a boat ride.
                                        Anyone can build a dark ride.
                                        Anyone can build a spinner ride.

                                        But somehow, when Walt built Disneyland, there was something incredibly special about Casey Jr, the Mark Twain, Mr Toad or Dumbo. They have proven their successes as something above and beyond what their simple foundations would have you believe they are. The argument that "Anyone can build an app," is true, but it ignores the underlying principal that has driven Disney's creative development for decades: their goal is to simply use it to tell the story they want to tell, and it's the STORY that only Disney can tell.
                                        I have not seen any evidence that Disney is better than their competitors at creating apps, games or websites. In fact, I would say (for example) that Knott's Iron Reef is pretty competitive in terms of actual playability to Toy Story Midway Mania. Where Disney beats Knott's is the theming of the surroundings, building and queue, but, if I had to chose between the two rides, I actually feel Iron Reef is more exciting and playable. It's been many years since I've dropped a quarter to play a video game, but when my family is at Knott's we nearly always play this together.

                                        Disney's website is often balky, and viewing, organizing and downloading my photos was often a frustrating experience. The last time I tried to purchase an annual pass using my cellphone (while at Knott's, ironically), it hung and then I accidently ended up purchasing the wrong option. I had to call customer service to get it sorted out, which involved purchasing another pass, and then getting a refund for the first one.

                                        When I've used Disney's app in the park, it has often froze and even quit unexpectedly. I sometimes had trouble logging on, searching for information, and freezing while trying to make dining reservations. WiFi reception is spotty.

                                        In the past, I've purchased Disney branded video games for my daughter when she was the target age, and she never played them. Waste of money.

                                        So, again, if Disney has some kind of actual competitive advantage in video games, apps and websites, I don't know what it is, aside from the fact that they have a built in, captive audience. If Midway Mania was sitting next to Iron Reef at Knott's, we'd chose the latter, all else being equal.

                                        Originally posted by MrLiver View Post

                                        Still don't really understand this. You can just choose not to use the app. It wouldn't be any different than refusing to go on the teacups because they make you sick. This vexation against the app itself even being developed, is akin to saying "spinning rides make me sick so Disney should remove all spinning rides from the park." It's mere existence shouldn't impact you in any meaningful way.
                                        Read what I wrote: "And if the app does become overly important, I personally feel that Disney will diminish my enjoyment of their park, and that's a pity."

                                        Note that I chose my words very carefully. Especially the two words highlighted above. Overly Important.

                                        While I am wandering around Fantasyland, the Teacups are not part of the story. They are a distinct and discrete ride. I can fully enjoy everything else that Fantasyland has to offer while completely ignoring their existence. I may be mistaken, but it sounds to me that Disney is planning something different for it's app: it will add an additional layer of play and interaction to the entire land. It remains to be seen just how important it will be to fully experiencing the land to have the app.

                                        Maybe it will just be like Hidden Mickeys: some of us know they are there, and (re-)discovering them adds an additional layer of enjoyment and fun to our visit. Or, maybe it will be more like the jokes on the Jungle Cruise: without them, the whole experience suffers greatly. I know, how could there be the Jungle Cruise without the jokes? Well, that was the original plan, and I suppose the deaf still experience it that way.

                                        Maybe it will start out like the former and become more like the latter over time (especially if Disney finds a way to monetize it.)
                                        Last edited by whiteness; 03-20-2019, 07:38 AM.
                                        Dumbo rats: the other lovable rodents.

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          Originally posted by whiteness View Post
                                          So, again, if Disney has some kind of actual competitive advantage in video games, apps and websites, I don't know what it is, aside from the fact that they have a built in, captive audience. If Midway Mania was sitting next to Iron Reef at Knott's, we'd chose the latter, all else being equal.
                                          And that's fine, as that's your own personal subjective choice. I honestly think the mobile app is amazing. Getting wait times, booking dining and Fastpass reservations, downloading photos and getting park details deliver directly to your phone has been a much needed advancement.

                                          But as far as wifi and access and technology, I think you're spending too much time focusing on their current implementation rather than focusing on their direction. They are obviously spending this money and working to deliver these products because they believe they are necessary to appeal to current AND future audiences.

                                          I don't have any problems using the app. But surely you have to see that a buggy app that can be fixed is still better than no app at all.


                                          Note that I chose my words very carefully. Especially the two words highlighted above. Overly Important.

                                          While I am wandering around Fantasyland, the Teacups are not part of the story.
                                          Are any attractions part of the story of the land they are in? If you have medical conditions that prevent you from riding Indiana Jones, or Space Mountain or the Matterhorn are you not missing out on part of the story?

                                          If the additional details being offered thru the app are that critical that you fear missing out on them, just pick up the app and explore them. Maybe you will find some fun in it after all.

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