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  • #61
    Yes


    So this land is going to be like you are fully in a land...but the other lands your in a theme park. Maybe let other CM make characters based off the lands they are in and add more people who make the land feel real.
    Tomorrowland and Toontown Especially will feel hollow.
    Happy Halloween!!!

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by JerrodDRagon View Post
      Yes


      So this land is going to be like you are fully in a land...but the other lands your in a theme park. Maybe let other CM make characters based off the lands they are in and add more people who make the land feel real.
      Tomorrowland and Toontown Especially will feel hollow.
      I think that despite the detail, one will always realize they're still in a theme park. You may be transported away for a short time, but nothing tramples immersion than sharing the limited space of GE with 10k other sweaty bodies.

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by MrLiver View Post
        I don't have any problems using the app. But surely you have to see that a buggy app that can be fixed is still better than no app at all.
        I'm sure it's a fine App, but Disney has no unique ability to create apps, or video games, or websites versus their competitors. If more of the value that guests derive from their tickets comes from things that Disney is not uniquely better at producing, then they will sacrifice part of their relative advantage over their competitors.

        Originally posted by MrLiver View Post
        If the additional details being offered thru the app are that critical that you fear missing out on them, just pick up the app and explore them. Maybe you will find some fun in it after all.
        That's the point: I don't want Disney to potentially put me in that position. I agree that there are certain aspects of DL that are not targeted towards me today (storybook land, although I can still ride it for the nostalgia), but they are not important to the appreciation of the ambience and/or backstory of their land.

        Knott's also allows guests to interact with Ghost town, but you don't need a cellphone to do it. Last time I was there when they had Ghost Town Alive, we helped deliver a package and we danced with the saloon singer at the Hodown. Amazing what they were able to accomplish with human creativity and enthusiasm. Plus, my family could participate together as a team and even interact with other guests. And they can offer a new story every visit, because a lot of it is ad libbed by the Cast Members. Brilliant.

        Actually, one reason why I don't enjoy Knott's as much as some might is because I don't like the type of 'coasters that Knott's has so many of. Space Mountain and Indiana Jones is my limit. I would enjoy, and visit, Knott's much more if they had fewer coasters and more dark rides. But their pass is cheap, and they still have other stuff I can enjoy (like Ghost Town Alive.) If I had to pay $1,000 for a Knott's pass, I'd pass on it...
        Dumbo rats: the other lovable rodents.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by Westsider View Post
          One way SW:GE is going to clash with Disneyland is the way the CM's interact with you. At the two attractions, there is no "greeter" no "grouper" no "loader" or "unloader" in the traditional sense…The CM's will all have themed phrasing to use, and they will not acknowledge that they are operating a ride or working a cash register...

          …while some Star Wars fans and AP's might be willing to play along, the average tourist and casual visitor isn't going to know what's happening or how to respond. Guests will be frustrated and it just won't be worth it...
          This is a big "red flag" for me. Since 1955, Disney established a standard set of protocols and a specific way of dealing with the Guest. Consistency was the standard operating procedure.

          Now it seems SWGE is going to change all that. I understand Disney wants to make it an "immersive" experience, and that's all well and good for the SW fanatic. I for one do not wish to "roll play". And this begs the question: how long before the way the other Lands and SWGE clash over a new way of doing things? With the current crop of executives, I can see them forcing the other Lands to conform to the SWGE model – changing 65 years of SOP.

          Originally posted by whiteness View Post
          And if the app does become overly important, I personally feel that Disney will diminish my enjoyment of their park, and that's a pity.
          Originally posted by MrLiver View Post
          Still don't really understand this. You can just choose not to use the app...
          I understand Whiteness' point, and I strongly agree. In addition, another consequence of making the app all too important is the sheer annoyance factor. What is nice about Disneyland is the escapism of everyday life. We deal with people every day on their phones; mostly in a negative way (at least in my experience). The moron screwing up traffic because they're on their phone. The all-too-self-important person including everyone within ear shot into their conversation. The family at a restaurant and nobody is talking to each other because they are all on their phones. People physically at a concert but watching it through their phone screens.

          We see it every day. People disengaged in real life and augmenting it with a digital "life". That is the last thing I want to see at Disneyland; a bunch of self-indulged people so wrapped up in their phone that they are missing the big picture as well as the small details.
          Last edited by stovk; 03-20-2019, 11:41 AM.

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by MrLiver View Post
            Still don't really understand this.
            Neither does DLR management. Which is exactly the point.



            "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
            it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
            together with every variety of recreation and fun,
            designed to appeal to everyone."

            - Walt Disney

            "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
            - Michael Eisner

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by stovk View Post


              I understand Whiteness' point, and I strongly agree. In addition, another consequence of making the app all too important is the sheer annoyance factor. What is nice about Disneyland is the escapism of everyday life. We deal with people every day on their phones; mostly in a negative way (at least in my experience). The moron screwing up traffic because they're on their phone. The all-too-self-important person including everyone within ear shot into their conversation. The family at a restaurant and nobody is talking to each other because they are all on their phones. People physically at a concert but watching it through their phone screens.

              We see it every day. People disengaged in real life and augmenting it with a digital "life". That is the last thing I want to see at Disneyland; a bunch of self-indulged people so wrapped up in their phone that they are missing the big picture as well as the small details.
              I'm not here to argue against you, you use a lot of valid examples of how someone using their phone at the wrong time can negatively affect the others around them. But I am curious about the family in the restaurant not talking to each other example you provided. You say that "we" deal with people every day on their phones and it affects us negatively but I am wondering how, say walking into an Olive Garden and seeing another family across the room on their phones negatively affects you? Or me for that matter? I get maybe feeling sorry for them but what they do in this specific instance is their prerogative and I shouldn't be allowing it to affect me and you shouldn't be allowing it to affect you. Again.. in this specific instance, of course.

              Maybe you see other folks using their phones to check wait/show times, reserve Fastpasses or download their Photopass photos as an annoyance but in all these instances a trip is being made better, in my humble opinion. If this is bothering you somehow, I'm not entirely sure what to say or suggest.

              But on the flip side of this, yes, a Guest scrolling through Facebook with their brightness all the way up while others are trying to enjoy an attraction like Pirates of the Caribbean is certainly not taking into account their surroundings or the myriad of other people they might be affecting and is probably that person you referred to earlier who causes traffic problems.

              I for one am in the corner of using our phones to make our days better or more convenient in the park. Fun little things like decoding text or messages in attractions are an added bonus if we choose to pursue them, I think they are fine and can be implemented well. But I also agree with you that we probably don't want to see our phones become TOO much of a requirement to enjoy our day. Example, including a digital version of the original Indiana Jones glyph decoder can be an awesome way for Guests who have the Disneyland app to discover something new while saving paper and not having to worry about them running out or a limited run of the decoder. Conversely, removing much of the attractions backstory told to you in line (lets use the news reel footage room for this example) and then deciding that you can only view it on your phone would be a poor implementation off the app, effectively requiring you to have a phone and keep your face glued to it to fully appreciate the attraction.

              I think as long as we don't cross the line from scenario one into scenario two, things are fine. Technology will always be there and will always be evolving. I have experienced total frustration, pure gratefulness and everything in between where phones/technology in the park are concerned. I feel like there are both negative and positive ways to approach solving any problem that might arise concerning them and feel that simply telling people not to use it or feeling that they shouldn't be allowed to is going the a negative route up against a change we are powerless to stop.
              First of all, the name's not "Zippy"! As a matter of fact, I don't believe I've ever met another bot named Zippy, so one can only assume that you came up with "Zippy" in reference to my speed, which may be technically accurate, but lacks a certain creativity!

              Comment


              • #67
                I think the park went downhill when they added tv monitors to the park. As if kids don't watch enough tv, they now get to watch in the park. How could you watch tv in Disneyland? Once they take out all the tv monitors, the park can begin to get back to its roots.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by Blurr View Post
                  If this is bothering you somehow, I'm not entirely sure what to say or suggest.
                  After further review, I deleted my response. Sadly, it is a lost cause.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Blurr View Post

                    I'm not here to argue against you, you use a lot of valid examples of how someone using their phone at the wrong time can negatively affect the others around them. But I am curious about the family in the restaurant not talking to each other example you provided. You say that "we" deal with people every day on their phones and it affects us negatively but I am wondering how, say walking into an Olive Garden and seeing another family across the room on their phones negatively affects you? Or me for that matter? I get maybe feeling sorry for them but what they do in this specific instance is their prerogative and I shouldn't be allowing it to affect me and you shouldn't be allowing it to affect you. Again.. in this specific instance, of course.

                    Maybe you see other folks using their phones to check wait/show times, reserve Fastpasses or download their Photopass photos as an annoyance but in all these instances a trip is being made better, in my humble opinion. If this is bothering you somehow, I'm not entirely sure what to say or suggest.

                    But on the flip side of this, yes, a Guest scrolling through Facebook with their brightness all the way up while others are trying to enjoy an attraction like Pirates of the Caribbean is certainly not taking into account their surroundings or the myriad of other people they might be affecting and is probably that person you referred to earlier who causes traffic problems.

                    I for one am in the corner of using our phones to make our days better or more convenient in the park. Fun little things like decoding text or messages in attractions are an added bonus if we choose to pursue them, I think they are fine and can be implemented well. But I also agree with you that we probably don't want to see our phones become TOO much of a requirement to enjoy our day. Example, including a digital version of the original Indiana Jones glyph decoder can be an awesome way for Guests who have the Disneyland app to discover something new while saving paper and not having to worry about them running out or a limited run of the decoder. Conversely, removing much of the attractions backstory told to you in line (lets use the news reel footage room for this example) and then deciding that you can only view it on your phone would be a poor implementation off the app, effectively requiring you to have a phone and keep your face glued to it to fully appreciate the attraction.

                    I think as long as we don't cross the line from scenario one into scenario two, things are fine. Technology will always be there and will always be evolving. I have experienced total frustration, pure gratefulness and everything in between where phones/technology in the park are concerned. I feel like there are both negative and positive ways to approach solving any problem that might arise concerning them and feel that simply telling people not to use it or feeling that they shouldn't be allowed to is going the a negative route up against a change we are powerless to stop.
                    While the family in the restaurant may not directly be impacting his experience, the frequent disconnect is troubling for society at large.
                    Earlier I posted this link, which cites a rise in unhappiness, depression, suicide and disconnect due to digital media: http://worldhappiness.report/ed/2019...digital-media/

                    It dropped the US on the World Happiness rank.

                    Stovk is right to be concerned. How much can we be polite when there are people either suffering or don't realize what they are doing to their bodies and relationships. Even if they never suffer a physical health consequence, last thing we need are zombies who can't communicate or hold relationships running the world.

                    People are popping the question (to get married) through text. There is a rise in solo honeymoons.
                    Remember the drama and fear you had in grade school calling a person you liked on the phone? Or the community you had in video stores when live people shared their passion for all types of film, instead of an algorithm telling you if you want Spider Man or Captain America?
                    There is a new arthritis directly related to phone usage.

                    Sure, digital media has pros, but fat chance society at large can or knows how to use it correctly. We have the world at our fingertips, but we're more bored, disconnected and unsatisfied than ever. Access to all the information in the world, but none smarter.

                    I always bring up the obesity argument. If one wants to eat that much, no, it does not directly impact me in the moment. But when 100 million people do it, yes, that affects me because it raises my premiums and affects my quality of health care because too many resources are needed for them. Not to mention it makes for an unhealthy, unproductive and possibly lazy country.

                    Lastly, I have to point out that while it's nice to make life easier, this isn't the end all be all. Hard work is okay. It's respected. It's okay to do things for yourself, even if it takes more time. Think about it: if tech is simplifying life, why is life still busier than ever? If tech makes everything easy, why are we still confused, unhappy, depressed and suicidal.

                    Face it, humans are meant to be relational.
                    Last edited by HiddenMickey87; 03-20-2019, 01:08 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by whiteness View Post
                      I'm sure it's a fine App, but Disney has no unique ability to create apps, or video games, or websites versus their competitors.
                      And again: this is akin to saying that Disney possesses no unique ability to build a roller coaster. I'm guessing you would be willing to admit though, that a roller coaster such as Big Thunder is actually greater than just the technology used to present it. If the audience can see past that foundation and judge something like Big Thunder, based on the story and details presented, and not just the common foundation that anyone could build and present, then so too can they find value in an app that is presenting them with a story that only Disney can tell.

                      That's the point: I don't want Disney to potentially put me in that position. I agree that there are certain aspects of DL that are not targeted towards me today (storybook land, although I can still ride it for the nostalgia), but they are not important to the appreciation of the ambience and/or backstory of their land.
                      Apparently, whether an attraction or app is essential the backstory of the land, is entirely within one's own purview to decide. If you want to believe that Storybook Land or the Teacups are unessential to appreciating Fantasyland, you are certainly willing to do so. But I doubt you would be willing to advocate for their removal from the park, simply because of the low opinion you hold of these attractions? So why then would you advocate for removal and discontinuation of an app, that others do enjoy and may find essential to their experience? At this point it seems more like enforcing a punishment upon those guests who have a different set of priorities.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by MrLiver View Post

                        And again: this is akin to saying that Disney possesses no unique ability to build a roller coaster. I'm guessing you would be willing to admit though, that a roller coaster such as Big Thunder is actually greater than just the technology used to present it. If the audience can see past that foundation and judge something like Big Thunder, based on the story and details presented, and not just the common foundation that anyone could build and present, then so too can they find value in an app that is presenting them with a story that only Disney can tell.

                        .

                        Apparently, whether an attraction or app is essential the backstory of the land, is entirely within one's own purview to decide. If you want to believe that Storybook Land or the Teacups are unessential to appreciating Fantasyland, you are certainly willing to do so. But I doubt you would be willing to advocate for their removal from the park, simply because of the low opinion you hold of these attractions? So why then would you advocate for removal and discontinuation of an app, that others do enjoy and may find essential to their experience? At this point it seems more like enforcing a punishment upon those guests who have a different set of priorities.
                        Disney excels in roller coasters because of their theming. If you want bigger and badder and faster (and nothing more, which is fine), Disney is not the place for it. With few exceptions, Disney doesn't really stand out in coasters other than theming, backstory, special effects and detailed queues. I'm sure Disney could compete with Six Flags and Busch if it wanted to, but that's not its sole focus.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by HiddenMickey87 View Post

                          While the family in the restaurant may not directly be impacting his experience, the frequent disconnect is troubling for society at large.
                          Earlier I posted this link, which cites a rise in unhappiness, depression, suicide and disconnect due to digital media: http://worldhappiness.report/ed/2019...digital-media/

                          It dropped the US on the World Happiness rank.

                          Stovk is right to be concerned. How much can we be polite when there are people either suffering or don't realize what they are doing to their bodies and relationships. Even if they never suffer a physical health consequence, last thing we need are zombies who can't communicate or hold relationships running the world.

                          I always bring up the obesity argument. If one wants to eat that much, no, it does not directly impact me in the moment. But when 100 million people do it, yes, that affects me because it raises my premiums and affects my quality of health care because too many resources are needed for them. Not to mention it makes for an unhealthy, unproductive and possibly lazy country.
                          Stovk is welcomed to be concerned, I mentioned that in my post, he is totally allowed to feel pity for the family in the booth across from him (sorry, I use "he" without knowing your actual gender Stovk, no offense intended if I get it wrong), I would feel sorry for them too if they really were that disconnected from one another but also that it shouldn't ruin my dinner. I never said that he shouldn't, just that I don't understand how he could see ALL people using their phones or technology as an annoyance when there are so many positive things it could be being used for in that moment (such as the previously listed time checking/fastpass booking, etc). I merely think those moments of annoyance should be reserved for when someone is actually doing something blatantly rude with it, and rightfully so!

                          On the matter of depression and damage, I don't know enough about it to speak intelligently. But I do know that we as humans make decisions that negatively affect us all the time. Does that same family not have the right to order bacon on the sandwich because it could theoretically lead to obesity/cancer or should we take away the right for an individual to choose to smoke, even if they know what it might do to their bodies and our health insurance premiums? What about ordering a glass of wine? Alcohol can be dangerous if left unchecked as well, technology and cell phone use should be treated the same. Assuming cell phone and digital usage does damage us, Guests are welcome to damage themselves in this way if they see fit. That doesn't exclude them from being courteous though, I never argued that it does. In the same way a smoker should be using the designated smoking section, someone using their phone shouldn't be stopping in a crowded walkway right after a parade.
                          First of all, the name's not "Zippy"! As a matter of fact, I don't believe I've ever met another bot named Zippy, so one can only assume that you came up with "Zippy" in reference to my speed, which may be technically accurate, but lacks a certain creativity!

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            I guess basically what I would like Disney do is be pro-active in limiting unnecessary use of media. Make the experience and interactive in real life. Obviously Disney isn't a nanny and proper training starts at home. But they do have influence. However, as a business, they're interested in money and image. The dollars will take precedent over rising teen depression until this becomes a big enough world issue, which I assume it will in the future. Till then, they won't sacrifice the free PR for their instagrammable products. It's that damning conundrum between free market capitalism and moral choices.

                            They could train staff to enforce the no phones/screens rules on rides/during shows. They could put out episodes that show the effects of digital usage. But its easier and more profitable to keep us fed, quiet, mouths closed and wallets open.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by HiddenMickey87 View Post
                              I guess basically what I would like Disney do is be pro-active in limiting unnecessary use of media. Make the experience and interactive in real life. Obviously Disney isn't a nanny and proper training starts at home. But they do have influence. However, as a business, they're interested in money and image. The dollars will take precedent over rising teen depression until this becomes a big enough world issue, which I assume it will in the future. Till then, they won't sacrifice the free PR for their instagrammable products. It's that damning conundrum between free market capitalism and moral choices.

                              They could train staff to enforce the no phones/screens rules on rides/during shows. They could put out episodes that show the effects of digital usage. But its easier and more profitable to keep us fed, quiet, mouths closed and wallets open.
                              I think your first line here speaks to what I was thinking is okay in terms of what the Disneyland App should and can do. It should act as a minor enhancement to something that is otherwise already incredible, it definitely shouldn't be what is required to make the experience incredible to begin with. Small things like decoding hidden messages and booking Fastpasses; awesome! Creating a lack of back story in an attraction and then relying on folks to open their phones to understand why they are here to begin with? Not so much. Thankfully I don't think we've crossed this line yet.

                              There's a time and place for everything and a good and bad way to use all things. I will reserve my annoyance for the Guest who has their phone out, blinding me on a dark ride and openly encourage the Guest who is hacking files for the Resistance in Galaxy's Edge in the same way I enjoy seeing Guests use their wands in the Wizarding World.
                              First of all, the name's not "Zippy"! As a matter of fact, I don't believe I've ever met another bot named Zippy, so one can only assume that you came up with "Zippy" in reference to my speed, which may be technically accurate, but lacks a certain creativity!

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by stovk View Post

                                After further review, I deleted my response. Sadly, it is a lost cause.
                                "No cause is lost if there is but one fool left to fight for it." -William Turner

                                For the record I am not calling you a literal fool here, I've nothing but respect for you and all other members on the forum, Stovk. As I stated, you brought up some very real and some very valid points. My take away from the original post I quoted you from was that you took all cell phone usage in the park as an annoyance at any time, despite the circumstances it may be under. If that is the case, then I will continue to respectfully disagree with you and continue to assert that there is a time and place for cell phone usage and not being educated on etiquette in general will cause negative experiences for others.

                                If I did in some way misinterpret your post and this is not what you meant, then I humbly apologize, that was not my intent. If you ever feel like getting what you need to say out to me but are worried it might de-rail the thread, my private message box is always open and I would be happy to converse with you there.
                                First of all, the name's not "Zippy"! As a matter of fact, I don't believe I've ever met another bot named Zippy, so one can only assume that you came up with "Zippy" in reference to my speed, which may be technically accurate, but lacks a certain creativity!

                                Comment


                                • #76
                                  Originally posted by HiddenMickey87 View Post
                                  They could train staff to enforce the no phones/screens rules on rides/during shows. They could put out episodes that show the effects of digital usage.
                                  Yep. They could create a "no flashes/screens on dark rides and shows" policy with clear rules, and punishment guidelines for different levels of offenders. They could hire and train Attraction and Security CMs whose duty is to monitor and enforce the rules. They could post animated signs in the queues and loading areas, showing Disney characters in comical skits that visually demonstrate the rules and the punishment for breaking them, in a way that makes the message clear to guests who speak any language. They could print illustrated, multi-language fliers that are given to every guest who enters the DLR and who checks into a Disney hotel. They could provide the animated character queue videos to local hotels to show on their in-house TV systems. They could create a PR campaign that floods worldwide travel agencies, mainstream media, social media, and local hotels with the rules. And they could stand firmly behind frontline cast and management in the enforcement of the rules, including escorting repeat offenders off the property, revoking APs, or banning return visits. In a short time the word would get around that DLR management has a no-tolerance policy toward guests who ruin rides and shows for other guests.


                                  Originally posted by HiddenMickey87 View Post
                                  But its easier and more profitable to keep us fed, quiet, mouths closed and wallets open.
                                  Sadly, true. In addition to being averse to spending the money, the executives with the power to create and enforce a "no flashes/screens on dark rides and shows" policy have no basis to think it's needed -- they're as distant from the guest experience as the proverbial hawk from the moon.
                                  "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                                  it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                                  together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                                  designed to appeal to everyone."

                                  - Walt Disney

                                  "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                                  - Michael Eisner

                                  Comment


                                  • #77
                                    Originally posted by Blurr View Post
                                    "No cause is lost if there is but one fool left to fight for it." -William Turner

                                    For the record I am not calling you a literal fool here, I've nothing but respect for you and all other members on the forum, Stovk. As I stated, you brought up some very real and some very valid points. My take away from the original post I quoted you from was that you took all cell phone usage in the park as an annoyance at any time, despite the circumstances it may be under. If that is the case, then I will continue to respectfully disagree with you and continue to assert that there is a time and place for cell phone usage and not being educated on etiquette in general will cause negative experiences for others.

                                    If I did in some way misinterpret your post and this is not what you meant, then I humbly apologize, that was not my intent. If you ever feel like getting what you need to say out to me but are worried it might de-rail the thread, my private message box is always open and I would be happy to converse with you there.
                                    THAT is a totally class-act post. Kudos!

                                    "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                                    it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                                    together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                                    designed to appeal to everyone."

                                    - Walt Disney

                                    "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                                    - Michael Eisner

                                    Comment


                                    • #78
                                      Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

                                      Yep. They could create a "no flashes/screens on dark rides and shows" policy with clear rules, and punishment guidelines for different levels of offenders. They could hire and train Attraction and Security CMs whose duty is to monitor and enforce the rules. They could post animated signs in the queues and loading areas, showing Disney characters in comical skits that visually demonstrate the rules and the punishment for breaking them, in a way that makes the message clear to guests who speak any language. They could print illustrated, multi-language fliers that are given to every guest who enters the DLR and who checks into a Disney hotel. They could provide the animated character queue videos to local hotels to show on their in-house TV systems. They could create a PR campaign that floods worldwide travel agencies, mainstream media, social media, and local hotels with the rules. And they could stand firmly behind frontline cast and management in the enforcement of the rules, including escorting repeat offenders off the property, revoking APs, or banning return visits. In a short time the word would get around that DLR management has a no-tolerance policy toward guests who ruin rides and shows for other guests.

                                      Sadly, true. In addition to being averse to spending the money, the executives with the power to create and enforce a "no flashes/screens on dark rides and shows" policy have no basis to think it's needed -- they're as distant from the guest experience as the proverbial hawk from the moon.
                                      This is always one of my favorite bits during the Star Tours 2.0 safety video. Poor Chewie gets blinded and the Mon Calamari sitting behind the child looks like he's straight up about to backhand him for taking the photo, haha.
                                      First of all, the name's not "Zippy"! As a matter of fact, I don't believe I've ever met another bot named Zippy, so one can only assume that you came up with "Zippy" in reference to my speed, which may be technically accurate, but lacks a certain creativity!

                                      Comment


                                      • #79
                                        Originally posted by Blurr View Post

                                        I think your first line here speaks to what I was thinking is okay in terms of what the Disneyland App should and can do. It should act as a minor enhancement to something that is otherwise already incredible, it definitely shouldn't be what is required to make the experience incredible to begin with. Small things like decoding hidden messages and booking Fastpasses; awesome! Creating a lack of back story in an attraction and then relying on folks to open their phones to understand why they are here to begin with? Not so much. Thankfully I don't think we've crossed this line yet.

                                        There's a time and place for everything and a good and bad way to use all things. I will reserve my annoyance for the Guest who has their phone out, blinding me on a dark ride and openly encourage the Guest who is hacking files for the Resistance in Galaxy's Edge in the same way I enjoy seeing Guests use their wands in the Wizarding World.
                                        At a minimum, the app can have reminders throughout it about keeping phones silent and away.

                                        In terms of GE, if you hate phones, opening day is not the day to go. Everyone will have their phone out to say they were the first to upload it.

                                        Comment


                                        • #80
                                          Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

                                          In addition to being averse to spending the money, the executives with the power to create and enforce a "no flashes/screens on dark rides and shows" policy have no basis to think it's needed -- they're as distant from the guest experience as the proverbial hawk from the moon.
                                          Bingo!

                                          Comment

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