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The Soullessness of the Current Disney

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  • #21
    Big problem with CEO IGER he good at the business/financial aspect,
    But lost sight of Disney philosophy- Company became many brands market
    -It now ALL about Wall Street !
    IMO -He is way over pay .
    Soaring like an EAGLE !

    Comment


    • #22
      Here are the other brand-affinity graphs associated with Disney+:

      Comment


      • #23
        And, here is a representation of the combined brand affinity:

        Comment


        • #24
          I think this new Disney+ can help foster a new generation of Disney charm and life. There are so many classics I enjoyed of Mickey, Minnie etc that you just cant find anymore. With Disney bringing these classics back to the masses I hope it encourages the classic cartoons and movies to get a revival and maybe see some more attractions for them after this wave of Marvel/Star Wars.

          The new Mickey Railway in Tomorrowland is a small start but a welcome addition IMO.

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
            Here are the other brand-affinity graphs associated with Disney+:
            Those are interesting to see. Thank you for sharing!

            Comment


            • #26
              Yeah, Disney from 2005 is gone. Its a corporation and until people stop buying I doubt anything will change.

              Loving Disney Since 2006!
              Portfolio: anthonyhays.com | Pictures: Flickr

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by cakvalasc View Post
                Yeah, Disney from 2005 is gone. Its a corporation and until people stop buying I doubt anything will change.
                Disney lost its way in 1994. Frank Wells was holding the business together, and, for the most part, each division was doing its best work since the death of the company's founder during that tenure (1984-1994). As soon as Wells died, everything started going wrong. Eisner was not only making one huge mistake after another. He was driving all of the key executive and creative talent from the organization.

                Robert Iger's legacy, now, is going to be dominated by his decision to build both Disney+ and Disney's larger streaming strategy, and he should definitely be commended for moving The Walt Disney Company in this direction. The hope now is that Disney+ forces the rest of Disney to correct the legacy of Eisner.

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by cakvalasc View Post
                  Yeah, Disney from 2005 is gone. Its a corporation and until people stop buying I doubt anything will change.
                  Right ..
                  Disney it became another company.....
                  Eisner's mandate the turn, from the corporate culture he created !
                  IMO
                  Soaring like an EAGLE !

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
                    Disney+ has the potential to be either the savior or the destroyer.

                    Even many of the dumbest people at Disney now seem to understand that Disney+ has to be strong with all four quadrants in order to be a viable streaming service that can lead The Walt Disney Company to future growth and to a better distribution model for Disney's video content than that, which exists currently.

                    Returning the "Walt Disney" trademark to something to which people of all demographic segments hold strong affinity requires not only making things that appeal to everyone but also communicating this universal appeal. Disney has to fight the image problems that it, itself, created, and Disney has to rebrand its library content that has contributed to said problems. For example, I have long argued Disney needs several brand extensions that will help preserve the correct and proper meaning of the Disney name.

                    "Mouseketeer" and "Mousketeer Club," for instance, could be used to identify anything Disney-related that has appeal limited to children, pre-adolescents, and/or adolescents. Disney+ could make the brand one of the "tiles" in a "carrousel" at the top of the user interface, and Disney+ could even offer broader options at the landing page (e.g., "Mousketeer Alumni," "Junior Mouseketeers," "Mouseketeer Features," "Mouseketeer Series," etc.).

                    Most of the acquired brands actually should be "Disneyfied," at that point, in that they should be integrated with this trademark that strongly appeals to everyone and that is, once again, synonymous with creativity and imagination.

                    "Star Wars" was perfectly integrated into Disneyland in 1986, and the main reason the Star Tours attraction worked so well is because the once-upon-a-time-in-a-faraway-place story held a timelessness that was consistent with that of The Magic Kingdom. Now, Disney, though, treats "Disney" and "Star Wars" as separate brands, for some reason, even though that one story is about to consume a vast chunk of Walt Disney's Disneyland. The "20th Century Fox" title cards should be removed, and "Walt Disney Pictures" should replace them. Moreover, the "Walt Disney Pictures" name should be reserved exclusively for stories and shows with timeless settings that are consistent with Disneyland: "Fantasia," "Pirates of the Caribbean," "Pinocchio," "20,000 Leagues under the Sea," "Star Wars," "Beauty and the Beast," etc.
                    DisneyLife in the U.K. and in a few other countries is dominated by kiddie junk and by copious amounts of low-quality content, and the service especially suffers from the fact that the meager wheat and all of the chaff are mixed together, instead of being curated and separated into collections that make sense.

                    DisneyLife, in fact, is so bad that it actually does significant damage to the goodwill associated with the Disney name among many of the people who have used the service, and, unfortunately, the prototype of Disney+ seems to repeat a few of the same mistakes.

                    For example, "Lizzy McGuire," as shown in the screenshot below, is an asset that should be cordoned in its own section of Disney+ along with other material that has limited appeal and that undermines the Disney trademark.

                    Disney+ is lumping far too much into the "Disney" area of the service.

                    Click image for larger version  Name:	20190430_172737.jpg Views:	0 Size:	49.8 KB ID:	8586019

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
                      DisneyLife in the U.K. and in a few other countries is dominated by kiddie junk and by copious amounts of low-quality content, and the service especially suffers from the fact that the meager wheat and all of the chaff are mixed together, instead of being curated and separated into collections that make sense.

                      DisneyLife, in fact, is so bad that it actually does significant damage to the goodwill associated with the Disney name among many of the people who have used the service, and, unfortunately, the prototype of Disney+ seems to repeat a few of the same mistakes.

                      For example, "Lizzy McGuire," as shown in the screenshot below, is an asset that should be cordoned in its own section of Disney+ along with other material that has limited appeal and that undermines the Disney trademark.

                      Disney+ is lumping far too much into the "Disney" area of the service.

                      And then... there's this:


                      Washington Post: The Avengers are the heroes of ‘Endgame,’ but Disney was the villain all along

                      Some excerpts:

                      The company has been collecting entertainment properties as if they were infinity stones — and it’s reshaping the media world in its own image.

                      “I am … inevitable,” declares the mad titan Thanos in “Avengers: Endgame,” the 22nd feature film in Marvel’s ongoing Cinematic Universe. As the story plays out, our purple people-killer strives to cement his legacy. Having reduced half the living universe to dust with a snap of his fingers at the end of the previous film, his one remaining desire is to ensure that his actions are irreversible: He intends, he claims, to reorganize the universe itself, wholly recasting it in his own image.

                      It should spoil nothing to say that the film’s heroes — a crew assembled over the course of 21 earlier films — defeat him just before all is lost. What goes unspoken, though, is the degree to which Marvel’s corporate parent, Walt Disney Co., has practically accomplished the very thing Thanos set out to do — not in the fictional world, but in our own very real one. With this film, the company demonstrates how totally and irreversibly it has rewritten the global media landscape in its own image. Indeed, Disney has far more in common with Thanos than it ever did with any of the Avengers who have become our pop culture’s most beloved icons....

                      ...Disney has assembled a vast array of intellectual properties, that encompasses the Star Wars franchise, Pixar, the Muppets, the Disney princesses and more. With its recent purchase of Fox, that stable now also includes global franchises like “Alien,” “Predator,” “The Simpsons” and “The X-Files,” along with the National Geographic library of shows — all of which will provide exclusive content for its recently announced streaming channel and “Netflix killer,” Disney Plus, as of next year....

                      Disney’s swelling assemblage of franchises and brands is the only Infinity Gauntlet that matters in the current entertainment landscape, offering it power enough to determine how many of us spend the vast majority of our free time. In 2018, Disney-owned productions already made up over a quarter of the domestic box office, and that market share now seems all but certain to grow even higher after the Fox merger.

                      But it’s not just the staggering amount of IP Disney now owns and operates: it’s how media industries have shifted from making movies and TV series to the production of serialized content that keeps us going, from one production to the next. Film and TV critic Matt Zoller Seitz describes this phenomenon as “the content endgame.” As digital media have converged, film franchises have become more like TV shows, while TV shows have become more like Hollywood blockbusters...

                      The mad titans of digital media — Disney, Netflix, Amazon, Facebook, Google — are all playing out their own versions of Thanos’s strategy.... These behemoths gain power by hunting down and incorporating other companies, working only to consolidate their own positions of power. For Disney, Lucasfilm and Marvel Studios were two of the jewels in its own gilded glove, while Fox may turn out to be the one that truly puts the company over the edge.

                      Thus, even as we consume serialized franchises about individuals banding together to defeat autocratic monopolists, we willingly surrender ourselves to the media corporations that seek to own the entirety of our media landscape. As the success of “Endgame” demonstrates, Disney can now snap its fingers, and an entire global entertainment culture reshapes itself to the company’s every whim. The tragedy is that it really does feel inevitable now. All of it does.

                      For those fans upset by this most recent faux-finale’s farewell to some of its key actors: The endless rebirth of branded figures like Iron Man, Captain America, Black Widow, Thor and Hawkeye is inevitable. The next cycle of complexly interwoven franchise tiers is inevitable. The next game-changing and record-breaking crossover event is inevitable. And yes, Disney’s Thanos-like, iron-fisted rule over the global entertainment industry is by now, alas, inevitable.



                      "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                      it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                      together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                      designed to appeal to everyone."

                      - Walt Disney

                      "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                      - Michael Eisner

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
                        As the success of “Endgame” demonstrates, Disney can now snap its fingers, and an entire global entertainment culture reshapes itself to the company’s every whim. The tragedy is that it really does feel inevitable now. All of it does.
                        That is the part I do not like
                        I dislike
                        monopolize
                        in any business .....and that the fear ,I have with Disney......
                        or any other company !






                        Last edited by Eagleman; 04-30-2019, 05:48 PM.
                        Soaring like an EAGLE !

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          I am willing to criticize Disney management when doing so is appropriate, but this criticism seems misplaced.

                          Disney's competitors are behemoths with their own deep pockets and/or wealth of assets.

                          Apple, Amazon, Alphabet (the parent of Google), AT&T (Time Warner), Comcast (NBCUniversal), Sony, and Netflix are all powerful in their own individual ways, so Walt Disney's major acquisitions have not only made sense and been profitable; Disney really had to fortify itself, and its portfolio, in order to survive and to thrive in this changed environment.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            In fact, these purchases are probably still not enough.

                            Spotify is at the top of my list of potential acquisitions for Walt Disney, and doing so may entail buying some assets from Sony.

                            Viacom is also going to be gobbled up by one of the other companies (e.g. CBS, Apple, Netflix, etc.) soon, so Disney may even be considering that potential combination.

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
                              I am willing to criticize Disney management when doing so is appropriate, but this criticism seems misplaced.

                              Disney's competitors are behemoths with their own deep pockets and/or wealth of assets.

                              Apple, Amazon, Alphabet (the parent of Google), AT&T (Time Warner), Comcast (NBCUniversal), Sony, and Netflix are all powerful in their own individual ways, so Walt Disney's major acquisitions have not only made sense and been profitable; Disney really had to fortify itself, and its portfolio, in order to survive and to thrive in this changed environment.
                              YOUR RIGHT........
                              If Disney did not buy Fox -NBCUniversal would have........
                              With your statement ,I agree..........and it is about surviving.....
                              But still hate ......the
                              monopolize
                              ,matter what company. and whole environment.....
                              It's the
                              Consumer's that getting hurt !
                              Soaring like an EAGLE !

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                The tech companies are to blame, really. They are muscling their way into the entertainment business and creating new competition.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
                                  The tech companies are to blame, really. They are muscling their way into the entertainment business and creating new competition.
                                  Right..they changing the game ......and it does make
                                  new competition...in the entertainment business
                                  whole environment ,and I do not like it !....that me
                                  IMO
                                  Last edited by Eagleman; 04-30-2019, 06:58 PM.
                                  Soaring like an EAGLE !

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by HiddenMickey87 View Post
                                    I read an article today stating that successful CEOs like Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos took personality tests and all scored low in one category: Concern for Others.
                                    While the article stated that this is not necessarily a bad thing -- i.e. that they simply put their work ahead of what people thought of it -- I think this is a big problem with CEOs. They're great at the business/financial aspect, but often these companies grow and lose the soul/philosophy of what they started as. I wouldn't be surprised if Iger scored low in this category as well. To hell with philosophy and history, it's whatever makes the money... and we'll just throw in a little Walt when it's convenient or seemingly excuses our choices.
                                    I don't have to agree with Jeff Bezos about lots of things he believes or stands for but as a person who bought Amazon stock 20 years ago and still holds substantial shares in Amazon, I can definitely say that Bezos' "concern for me" as an investor is top notch. He is doing the job shareholders expect of him and that is fine with me.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
                                      I am willing to criticize Disney management when doing so is appropriate, but this criticism seems misplaced.
                                      I think the interesting thing about the article wasn't its criticism of Disney, but (in light of your post about DisneyLife in the U.K.) who wrote it:

                                      Dan Hassler-Forest is an author and public speaker on media franchises, cultural theory, and political economy. He lives in the Netherlands and works as assistant professor in the Media Studies department of Utrecht University.
                                      The other interesting thing is the reader's reply section following the article -- 103 comments at the moment, and all but one or two defend Disney.
                                      "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                                      it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                                      together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                                      designed to appeal to everyone."

                                      - Walt Disney

                                      "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                                      - Michael Eisner

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

                                        I think the interesting thing about the article wasn't its criticism of Disney, but (in light of your post about DisneyLife in the U.K.) who wrote it:



                                        The other interesting thing is the reader's reply section following the article -- 103 comments at the moment, and all but one or two defend Disney.
                                        wonder why?
                                        Soaring like an EAGLE !

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post





                                          The other interesting thing is the reader's reply section following the article -- 103 comments at the moment, and all but one or two defend Disney.
                                          Logical fallacy
                                          argumentum ad populum


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