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  • [Question] Disney Executives

    Do Disney Executives get any perks that are different than regular cast members? I'm not talking about people like Bob Iger and his senior staff who are at the super top. But I'm talking about like directors and VPs.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Sightalignment View Post
    Do Disney Executives get any perks that are different than regular cast members? I'm not talking about people like Bob Iger and his senior staff who are at the super top. But I'm talking about like directors and VPs.
    Yes. Disney Parks Executives and their families get the VIP treatment(FPs, front of the line access to rides).

    This perk has been viewed controversial to some members on this board, as some think this perk is ridiculous, while others chew out the executives for not waiting in line and chatting with guests "like Walt did".

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Spongeocto4 View Post

      Yes. Disney Parks Executives and their families get the VIP treatment(FPs, front of the line access to rides).

      This perk has been viewed controversial to some members on this board, as some think this perk is ridiculous, while others chew out the executives for not waiting in line and chatting with guests "like Walt did".
      I'm okay with this actually. To me it isn't any different than not needing a reservation at the restaurant you may work at. So not really a perk but more like a professional courtesy.

      Comment


      • #4
        Of course they do. That type of perk, to IndianWarCanoe's point, is industry standard.

        Now, that doesn't mean that I don't prefer Walt's approach (who wouldn't?).

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Spongeocto4 View Post
          Yes. Disney Parks Executives and their families get the VIP treatment(FPs, front of the line access to rides).

          This perk has been viewed controversial to some members on this board, as some think this perk is ridiculous, while others chew out the executives for not waiting in line and chatting with guests "like Walt did".
          Fact check: as has been posted on this board many times, the perk isn't the issue; the problem is that too many Disney executives use it as a badge of elitism to distance themselves from DLR operations. In contrast, Walt insisted his execs spend part of their time in the park as a guest would, to experience the product first-hand and understand what needed to be plussed. Walt saw Disneyland as a show and the guests as his audience; he and his executives valued experiencing the show with the audience, as they did with their film audiences, to gauge what worked and what didn't. That did not prevent Walt or his execs from using their front-line perks when needed for the efficient performance of their jobs, but it gave them a depth of expertise in running Disneyland that is beyond that of today's Disney Parks execs.
          "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
          it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
          together with every variety of recreation and fun,
          designed to appeal to everyone."

          - Walt Disney

          "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
          - Michael Eisner

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

            Fact check: as has been posted on this board many times, the perk isn't the issue; the problem is that Disney executives use it as a badge of elitism to distance themselves from DLR operations. In contrast, Walt insisted his execs spend part of their time in the park as a guest would, to experience the product first-hand and understand what needed to be plussed. Walt saw Disneyland as a show and the guests as his audience; he and his executives valued experiencing the show with the audience, as they did with their film audiences, to gauge what worked and what didn't. That did not prevent Walt or his execs from using their front-line perks when needed for the efficient performance of their jobs, but it gave them a depth of expertise in running Disneyland that is beyond that of today's Disney Parks execs.
            That is an interesting take I suppose, but it's probably because things are a lot different than Walt Disney's time. I just think now the business model is a lot different now.

            If I didn't have to wait in a long line I wouldn't either. No big deal that Disney management doesn't either.

            Comment


            • #7
              So much speculation and guessing in these answers.

              Here you go:
              GCH complimentary valet parking, 24 instant Fastpasses, seating at shows and parades if arranged beforehand, free lockers, free photopass (including ride photos), free MaxPass, front of the the line character visits, table service seats if reserved beforehand, and depending on seniority, drop in access to 1901 lounge but never Le Salon Nouveau unless there's a Club 33 dining reservation involved somehow too.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

                Fact check: as has been posted on this board many times, the perk isn't the issue; the problem is that too many Disney executives use it as a badge of elitism to distance themselves from DLR operations. In contrast, Walt insisted his execs spend part of their time in the park as a guest would, to experience the product first-hand and understand what needed to be plussed. Walt saw Disneyland as a show and the guests as his audience; he and his executives valued experiencing the show with the audience, as they did with their film audiences, to gauge what worked and what didn't. That did not prevent Walt or his execs from using their front-line perks when needed for the efficient performance of their jobs, but it gave them a depth of expertise in running Disneyland that is beyond that of today's Disney Parks execs.
                x2........Valued experience of guest is be among them
                NOT
                distance themselves from them !
                Soaring like an EAGLE !

                Comment


                • #9
                  It seems to me that there's a slight difference in attitude between Walts management and present management.

                  Walts executives used their privilege to improve guest experience while present management uses it for themselves, screw the guests.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by micromind View Post
                    It seems to me that there's a slight difference in attitude between Walts management and present management.

                    Walts executives used their privilege to improve guest experience while present management uses it for themselves, screw the guests.
                    YEP....that truth
                    Executives Fast Pass
                    with
                    complimentary valet parking !
                    Distance themselves from guest.
                    Soaring like an EAGLE !

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by IndianWarCanoe View Post

                      That is an interesting take I suppose, but it's probably because things are a lot different than Walt Disney's time. I just think now the business model is a lot different now..
                      Yeah .... the “business model” has changed, and not for the better!

                      There’s a disconnect!
                      MY SIGNATURE:
                      Dear Peoplemover Fans, If you want to see a new attraction that at least mimics the 1967 Peoplemover in a future Tomorrowland remodel, you need to write to the powers-that-be, and let them know. If you don't - Then the next time Tomorrowland is remodeled, you will see a land barren of any "Peoplemover" type attraction.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by IndianWarCanoe View Post

                        That is an interesting take I suppose, but it's probably because things are a lot different than Walt Disney's time. I just think now the business model is a lot different now.

                        If I didn't have to wait in a long line I wouldn't either. No big deal that Disney management doesn't either.
                        Kind of why we use FP or Maxpass. It is our perk.
                        "And yes, we implore EVERYBODY to follow the park rules. Having off-ride footage is great, but any still photo's or video's taken ON the coasters at SFMM are strictly against the rules. They are there for your (and everybody's) safety." "Six Flags doesn't allow ANY loose articles on their coasters, and they don't allow video taping on their coasters. " BUT, "​ This is not true. Six Flags does not allow ANY On-Ride video or pictures on the rides. The ONLY way is if you get explicit permission from Park Management." ???

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Most
                          Executives
                          today , have a concept of :
                          "I better ,than you are".....( self Center )

                          Why
                          guest experience is
                          down !
                          Soaring like an EAGLE !

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Can we stick to the question and not editorialize based on so many only partially correct answers?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by vnormth View Post
                              Can we stick to the question and not editorialize based on so many only partially correct answers?
                              If we just stuck "to the question" this thread would be finished with one reply.

                              This is a forum which, by it's nature, invites discussion. If you are seeking "yes" or "no" answers, this probably isn't the place for you. If the "discussion" bothers you, then feel free to skip past the thread/posts.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by IndianWarCanoe View Post

                                I'm okay with this actually. To me it isn't any different than not needing a reservation at the restaurant you may work at. So not really a perk but more like a professional courtesy.
                                It's a little different. If you work at a restaurant and get to skip reservations, you still at least experience the product, which is the food, and perhaps the service, and you can observe how your customers are interacting. Furthermore, not all execs wish to stiff the guest at their expensive. For example, at movie theatres, it's not a good idea to give your employees their free passes to opening night of Star Wars.

                                If execs don't walk in the shoes of Disneyland guests -- which itself is not only much bigger but encompasses various elements, from attractions to shopping to dining to characters, etc etc -- they don't know how the guest really feels or what could be improved.

                                For example, if Chapek rides Buzz Lightyear through the exit -- or even through the FastPass queue, breezing by everything without stopping -- he misses the little details I see, like trash on the floor, peeling paint, and other poor upkeep. To me, that's a big deal, as Disneyland has always been classier and a step up from other theme parks. I expect chipping paint at my local carnival. But when you're paying Disney prices, you expect things to be in tip-top shape, not like the aftermath of a rave. I can expect some wear and tear at a Motel 6, but when I stay at Four Seasons, you better believe there better not be wear and tear.
                                Last edited by HiddenMickey87; 11-10-2019, 02:31 PM.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by vnormth View Post
                                  So much speculation and guessing in these answers.

                                  Here you go:
                                  GCH complimentary valet parking, 24 instant Fastpasses, seating at shows and parades if arranged beforehand, free lockers, free photopass (including ride photos), free MaxPass, front of the the line character visits, table service seats if reserved beforehand, and depending on seniority, drop in access to 1901 lounge but never Le Salon Nouveau unless there's a Club 33 dining reservation involved somehow too.
                                  Ah yes, the arrogant reply. Spoken like a Disney Executive.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Laugh-O-Grams View Post

                                    Ah yes, the arrogant reply. Spoken like a Disney Executive.
                                    He said arrogantly.

                                    I'm just answering the question...un-hypocritically, i might add. You should try it.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by stovk View Post

                                      If we just stuck "to the question" this thread would be finished with one reply.

                                      This is a forum which, by it's nature, invites discussion. If you are seeking "yes" or "no" answers, this probably isn't the place for you. If the "discussion" bothers you, then feel free to skip past the thread/posts.
                                      Discussion would be warranted if an opinion to be duscussed were posited...which it wasn't.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by HiddenMickey87 View Post
                                        If execs don't walk in the shoes of Disneyland guests -- which itself is not only much bigger but encompasses various elements, from attractions to shopping to dining to characters, etc etc -- they don't know how the guest really feels or what could be improved.

                                        For example, if Chapek rides Buzz Lightyear through the exit -- or even through the FastPass queue, breezing by everything without stopping -- he misses the little details I see, like trash on the floor, peeling paint, and other poor upkeep. To me, that's a big deal, as Disneyland has always been classier and a step up from other theme parks. I expect chipping paint at my local carnival. But when you're paying Disney prices, you expect things to be in tip-top shape, not like the aftermath of a rave. I can expect some wear and tear at a Motel 6, but when I stay at Four Seasons, you better believe there better not be wear and tear.
                                        Exactly. And for those who shrug off DLR management's culture of elitism as "no big deal" in terms of what it means to the customers' experience, here's the breakdown on park management:


                                        Originally posted by Westsider View Post
                                        Stage Manager - The entry level management you are most like to see in the park. They are broken into two categories. The Twentysomething New Manager who has worked at the park for 3 to 5 years before getting into the management training program, which TDA renames and rebrands every few years because they can't figure out a program that works for the long term. These young'uns are full of energy and think they are going to change the world, one Re-Ad at a time. Then there are the other Stage Managers, in their 40's to 60's who have worked at the park for decades but plataued at the entry-level manager. They are extremely knowledgeable about how Disneyland works, and they've seen it all, but most of them are also fairly bitter and have perfected the art of coasting towards retirement on a sea of mediocrity. They are the most fun to talk to once you earn their trust, as they can talk smack about executive decisions and TDA's flavor of the month programs and propaganda with the best of them. Some of these old ones are just bitter and boring, but some are really helpful and knowledgeable and even fun to get a drink with.

                                        Production Manager - The manager of the managers. Most have worked at the park for at least 10 years, if not 20 or 30. They are more corporate and less trustworthy than the Stage Managers, but the best ones can be trusted when it really hits the fan like today. The worst of them are just clueless, have no idea what they are talking about as they get moved from area to area every few years, and are just like the senior Stage Managers who are just punching the clock and counting down to retirement in a decade or two. The worst examples of this rank, and there are more than you'd believe, are like old dinosaurs from the 20th century who put in 30 to 35 hours a week but know how to play the game very well and suddenly disappear when a lightning storm shuts down the entire park. There are Production Managers and also Senior Production Managers, and there's no rhyme or reason what differentiates the two. There is some evidence that those who got a Master's Degree in business from CSUF or some online school get the Senior role and higher pay, while the gossip on the KCML shuttle is that some Senior Production Managers got their title by, ahem, being loose with their morals with their General Manager.

                                        General Manager - The lowest level of the executive ranks. The big dog of each area of the park, plus a GM for parkwide Entertainment. Disneyland has a half dozen GM's. They range from smart and very savvy and adorably fun (the woman wisely chosen to oversee Galaxy's Edge and Toontown Expansion), to dull and calcified and clueless (To protect the guilty, I will refrain from saying which area this GM or two oversees).

                                        Vice President - The person who runs each park, or hotel/DTD area. There are three VP's of any real importance in Anaheim. The VP for Disneyland is widely respected and often seen in the park on weekdays, on weekends, and at night as the fireworks are going off and the Guest Control crap is hitting the fan. She somehow instinctively knows where she should be. When the Power Dip hit this afternoon, she left her office in the Old Admin building and was checking in with the most impacted areas (mostly the Westside). The VP for DCA is almost the polar opposite, a finance guy hired from outside the company by Michael Colglazier and rarely seen or heard from, and NEVER actually spotted inside the park at any time of day, except for opening ceremony photo shoots. He knows nothing about Theme Park Operations and the front line CM's in DCA know it. The VP for the Hotels and Downtown Disney is sort of a mix, he knows the hotel business very well, knows little about Downtown Disney, but isn't seen or heard from much in either the hotels or the mall.

                                        Disneyland President - The absolute big dog of the yard. I've been around long enough to have seen a half dozen of these types, and they vary widely. They are surprisingly effective at setting the tone for the Resort about six months after they arrive through their 3 to 5 year contract. Matt Ouimet was beloved, intensely interested in theme park operations and how to make it better, and perhaps the best President that Disneyland has had since Walt. Ed Grier was a total void, clueless and never seen or heard from. George Kalogridis was a nice change, nothing spectacular, but a good one to get DCA relaunched. Michael Colglazier was almost entirely absent and unseen, but unlike Grier those who interacted with Colglazier regularly said he was a real snob and also kind of weird. Josh D'Amaro is a big improvement over his predecessor. Not sure that he will be as good as Ouimet was over time, but he's genuine and likable and good with people and seems actually interested in operating Disneyland, all things his predecessor lacked.

                                        But really, once you get beyond the Production Manager level, these are people you will rarely see in the park as a CM and almost never see them if you are a Guest. The executive team in Burbank who really call the shots has no use for anyone lower than a Vice President, and even then they just get the President to tell them what a Vice President thinks. The executives in Glendale who Imagineer the parks are perhaps even more removed and clueless than Burbank executives. The Imagineers of today have never worked in the parks, ever, like a Tony Baxter did. And they don't hang out in the parks on purpose like Walt's team of Imagineers did in the 1950's to 1970's.

                                        The Glendale executives are smart and talented, but they have no idea how a theme park works. And they have never stood in a Standby line. Ask any Attractions CM who has had to deal with some self-important Imagineer who argues at Greeter that they should be let into the Fastpass line without a Fastpass because they are an Imagineer and are too good to wait in Standby. That happens more than you would believe.
                                        "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                                        it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                                        together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                                        designed to appeal to everyone."

                                        - Walt Disney

                                        "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                                        - Michael Eisner

                                        Comment

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