Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tarzan's Treehouse Emergency Closes

Collapse

Get Away Today

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Eagleman
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
    Looks like the problem was more than just a misbehaving guest. From today's MiceChat Disneyland Update:

    "Last week, there was an incident with a guest breaking a portion of Tarzan Treehouse’s rope bridge. Since then, the broken slat has been replaced, but it has brought serious safety concerns to light.

    One of the scariest safety concerns about this unsupervised attraction is one of the first things encountered. Just after you cross the rope bridge, there is a landing with a box that is easily climbable. But should an unsupervised child do so, they could easily hoist themselves up and over the rope, possibly falling to the ground below.

    Going down the steps, you can feel which boards are firm and sturdy, and also the ones that are spongy and potentially ready for replacement."



    And yet it remains open. Combined with the reported cutbacks in CM staffing on this attraction, it increasingly looks like another accident waiting to happen.
    Extreme cost-cutting..........
    *Maintenance issue
    and
    *Cast Member ,should be staffed there
    for this exact reason!

    This is a
    Serious Safety Concerns

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Looks like the problem was more than just a misbehaving guest. From today's MiceChat Disneyland Update:

    "Last week, there was an incident with a guest breaking a portion of Tarzan Treehouse’s rope bridge. Since then, the broken slat has been replaced, but it has brought serious safety concerns to light.

    One of the scariest safety concerns about this unsupervised attraction is one of the first things encountered. Just after you cross the rope bridge, there is a landing with a box that is easily climbable. But should an unsupervised child do so, they could easily hoist themselves up and over the rope, possibly falling to the ground below.

    Going down the steps, you can feel which boards are firm and sturdy, and also the ones that are spongy and potentially ready for replacement."



    And yet it remains open. Combined with the reported cutbacks in CM staffing on this attraction, it increasingly looks like another accident waiting to happen.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagleman
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
    Disney's safety record has earned them a high level of skepticism -- especially during this period of extreme cost-cutting at Disney's domestic parks.
    I Agree......I have also become
    skeptic with Disney's safety record
    ,Specially during a period of extreme cost-cutting.......IMO

    Last edited by Eagleman; 11-12-2019, 05:15 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagleman
    replied
    I feel - no matter how big the ride / attraction
    There should always be =
    Cast Members staffing it !

    Disney needs to be prepared , for miss- behaving Guest at all times.
    But would like more facts .....with Treehouse incident.
    ( and we all , might never know ) IMO

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by WaltDisney'sAlec View Post
    The guest should probably not have been jumping on the bridge, but Disneyland should have been prepared for it. The fact that real wood went un-reinforced tells me Disney might not have been ready for a stress test, and unfortunately in this modern world Disney needs to be prepared for it more than anyone.
    Exactly. Especially considering that the average size and weight of DL customers has significantly increased in the past decades -- a fact that Disney admitted when it redesigned the Small World boats.

    Leave a comment:


  • WaltDisney'sAlec
    replied
    I walked across the Tarzan bridge fewer than 24 hours before it broke. There were no Cast Members staffing it, only one custodial cast sweeping the entire attraction which even itself seemed like a one-off. I was surprised to see no Cast Members, even where the climbing ropes are at the end. Make of that what you will.

    The guest should probably not have been jumping on the bridge, but Disneyland should have been prepared for it. The fact that real wood went un-reinforced tells me Disney might not have been ready for a stress test, and unfortunately in this modern world Disney needs to be prepared for it more than anyone.

    Legally, they won't be liable because it seems like a one-off occurrence with no precedent and proximate cause falls on the guest, but Disney bears but-for cause for bridge building and maintenance procedures. While it may have been foreseeable that a guest would jump on a rope bridge, it might not have been foreseeable that they would apply enough force to break a regularly maintained bridge. Because it had never happened before, Disney would not be legally liable for any injury he sustained (without going into their duty of care to park guests).

    Now that it has happened, Disney is on notice of the possibility of it happening and likely must take steps to reinforce the bridge and prevent things like this from happening. Looking at the app, the attraction is open again relatively soon after the incident. That tells me that Disney is confident it won't happen again and maybe even had a fix prepared before the incident happened.

    I wouldn't be surprised if this issue had been spotted by inspectors already and Disney decided to hold off on updating it until they absolutely had to before the problem suddenly presented itself. That would create some legal trouble, but the fact that the guest ran off and was unable to be located tells me that he's worried he's in trouble and will not sue.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by IndianWarCanoe View Post
    ...This theme park was built in the '50s and many of the attractions were added before modern standards for guard rails, handicap access, etc. It would have been hard for any public place, especially an amusement, park to keep up with the vast amounts of new government codes and regulations. Don't believe me, look at car manufacturers, toy manufacturers, baby crib manufacturers. It isn't hard to have a "poor record" with all of the newer regulations.
    The historical facts do not support your argument -- quite the opposite. Disney's poor record of safety began with the Pressler regime of the 90s, and had nothing to do with "trying to keep up with all the newer regulations." The post-accident investigations showed that they were the result of management cutting back on maintenance standards. And there was no doubt about the reason for the cutback -- as Pressler infamously told his maintenance personnel, "We have to ride these rides to failure to save money."

    DL accidents resulted in legislative demands to strengthen safety regulations, which spawned increasingly strict OSHA standards in the early 2000s. It was Disney's own record of safety that brought stricter regulations down on them.

    Last year Disney was fined for not following health department cleaning standards on DL's air cooling towers, which resulted in 22 cases of Legionnaires' Disease. Disney paid the fine, but steadfastly refused to admit responsibility.

    And it's not just at DLR. Last month at WDW, the Skyliner accident revealed that Disney employees were untrained and unequipped to evacuate the ride. As reported, Disney's first reaction was to deny that there was an accident, claiming it was "unscheduled downtime." They changed their story when frightened passengers, dangling high above the ground and water for hours, flooded social media with photos and videos of confused CMs helplessly milling about below.

    On the Treehouse incident, I agree with you that we need more facts. Idiotic guest behavior should not be ruled out -- CMs can tell horror stories of guests endangering themselves and others. But pending a thorough (and independent!) investigation, Disney's safety record has earned them a high level of skepticism -- especially during this period of extreme cost-cutting at Disney's domestic parks.
    Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 11-13-2019, 10:22 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • TN Country Boy
    replied
    When I was young (1970's) I would read about Walt Disney and Disneyland. Park maintenance was so particular about such things as lightbulbs that they would change them out every so often so the guests would rarely ever see a burned out bulb in the park. This includes every light on the Main Street Marquees etc.

    I understand the nostalgia of a wooden swinging bridge but Disneyland is not just a state park this bridge gets 1000's times the traffic any other bridge would get. What if a 1/8" steel plate was sandwiched between two boards. (With a slight bit of effort the bottom board could be slightly hollowed out and they could fit together seamlessly.) It would still look great and would hold up to anything. Except perhaps an elephant!

    Leave a comment:


  • IndianWarCanoe
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

    That's a double-strawman argument: Insisting on theme park safety does not require that we "take the side of the theme park operator when the fault may end up being the fault of a guest;" and no one is calling for the elimination of "all the things which made Disneyland fun."
    I didn't say anyone was calling for it, I was suggesting that when the lawyers have their pow-wow with the bean counters, then somebody may end up asking if they really need a rope style draw bridge? And I'm not saying you have to take side with the theme park, but where is the actual evidence that the piece of wood was rotten or needing replaced? From what was posted about the incident the adult park guest was jumping up and down on the bridge, something I think anyone who has been to Tom Sawyer's Island in the last 30 years knows they don't allow.

    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
    It also ignores Disney's track record of safety and public health issues -- a record so poor that it got Disneyland fined and spawned a spate of new Cal-OSHA regulations.
    This theme park was built in the '50s and many of the attractions were added before modern standards for guard rails, handicap access, etc. It would have been hard for any public place, especially an amusement, park to keep up with the vast amounts of new government codes and regulations. Don't believe me, look at car manufacturers, toy manufacturers, baby crib manufacturers. It isn't hard to have a "poor record" with all of the newer regulations.

    And of course I am not ignoring where there were cases of negligence in safety and repairs. Sometimes a tragedy like the person killed by a mooring cleat on the Rivers of America dock.

    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
    While there currently is no proof that Disney was at fault in this incident, there is nothing in their safety record that warrants them being giving the benefit of the doubt.

    I think this is where we will agree to disagree. We don't have all of the facts yet so maybe both deserve the benefit of the doubt, the park and the affected guest. Although the guest was the one reported to be jumping up and down. It may have been a rotten board, maybe a fluke, or possibly a set up for insurance too. I think we need more facts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by IndianWarCanoe View Post
    If we are not willing to take the side of the theme park operator when the fault may end up being the fault of a guest, then we can't also complain when every feature in the amusement park becomes as sterile and safe as some type of modern plastic boring lawyer designed playground equipment. We should expect no swinging bridges, no ladders, slides, tetering rocks, or all the things which made Disneyland fun. How fun is it walking across a concrete caged pedestrian over cross on a freeway? Is that what we want?
    That's a double-strawman argument: Insisting on theme park safety does not require that we "take the side of the theme park operator when the fault may end up being the fault of a guest;" and no one is calling for the elimination of "all the things which made Disneyland fun."

    It also ignores Disney's track record of safety and public health issues -- a record so poor that it got Disneyland fined and spawned a spate of new Cal-OSHA regulations.

    While there currently is no proof that Disney was at fault in this incident, there is nothing in their safety record that warrants them being giving the benefit of the doubt.


    Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 11-12-2019, 11:11 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by IndianWarCanoe View Post
    ...I think people are just making wild speculations that the park personnel and park maintenance were being remiss to keep this feature in good repair.
    Speaking of speculations:

    Originally posted by IndianWarCanoe View Post
    This attraction is inspected everyday for hazards, not to mention periodic inspections by OSHA and other agencies.
    It seems doubtful that you would have any first-hand information on how often, how thoroughly, and by whom the attraction is inspected.
    Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 11-12-2019, 11:04 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • IndianWarCanoe
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

    Exactly. And two facts are certain -- first, that since the Pressler regime Disney has accumulated a record of accidents caused by cutbacks in maintenance and staffing to increase profits; and second, that DLR staffing has been cut (again) this year to increase profits.
    Originally posted by Starcade View Post
    After looking more closely at some of the photos online it doesn't appear that the wooden slats had been reinforced at all. Simple solution could have been to drill a hole from one end to the other and insert a cable or rod which wouldn't be seen by guests but could have dramatically increased the strength of this bridge. Like others have said this is in a theme park which has huge volumes of people crossing it 365 days a year. To have just wood no matter what the type and letting it go nearly 20 years without replacement seems like neglect from my perspective.
    I am certain that after this incident the engineers will consider replacing the slats with a faux type of wood looking material that is reinforced. However that being said I think people are just making wild speculations that the park personnel and park maintenance were being remiss to keep this feature in good repair. Anyone could conceivably apply enough concentrated force to a piece of brand new wood to cause it to crack or break. It is the nature of wood to possibly do that, it actually comes down to a physics formula if you put it to paper. A baseball player can shatter a brand new bat with the exact right spot being hit by the ball coupled with the force of his swing. Doesn't mean the bat was dry rotted and neglected.

    This attraction is inspected everyday for hazards, not to mention periodic inspections by OSHA and other agencies. Why blame Disneyland for something when the proximate cause of this incident could likely all fall on one individual who chose to abuse the feature in a potentially destructive manner? If we are not willing to take the side of the theme park operator when the fault may end up being the fault of a guest, then we can't also complain when every feature in the amusement park becomes as sterile and safe as some type of modern plastic boring lawyer designed playground equipment. We should expect no swinging bridges, no ladders, slides, tetering rocks, or all the things which made Disneyland fun. How fun is it walking across a concrete caged pedestrian over cross on a freeway? Is that what we want?

    Some of you make it sound like this rope bridge feature was as dilapidated as the one in a Indiana Jones movie. Not that it wouldn't be an exiting adventure to cross wink-wink.
    It is after all supposed to be "Adventureland" not "Lawyerland".

    Leave a comment:


  • biggsworth
    replied
    I just hope they don't close it over this. Replace the bridge if need it reinforce it etc. 1 mishap over 20 years isn't the end of the world and shouldn't end the attraction.I just hope they took a look at what they could do to prevent this. I am not so quick to judge the guest. Yes the guest jumped up and down but it doesn't mean it couldn't have broken sooner or later if they aren't maintaining it either. Just the nature of walking on a rope bridge tells me there are lots of forces on them in general.

    Leave a comment:


  • Starcade
    replied
    After looking more closely at some of the photos online it doesn't appear that the wooden slats had been reinforced at all. Simple solution could have been to drill a hole from one end to the other and insert a cable or rod which wouldn't be seen by guests but could have dramatically increased the strength of this bridge. Like others have said this is in a theme park which has huge volumes of people crossing it 365 days a year. To have just wood no matter what the type and letting it go nearly 20 years without replacement seems like neglect from my perspective.

    Leave a comment:


  • TLand2055
    replied
    Originally posted by biggsworth View Post
    With the multiple issues we actually see that just means hundreds now are not seen by us.
    Unrelated to the thread, but another maintenance issue I saw.
    Back in August when I rode the Nemo subs, water was slowly dripping on top of my back, and many effects in there turned off too soon (I was in the rear). I'm sure there's even more issues throughout the park.

    Leave a comment:


  • TLand2055
    replied
    Originally posted by DisneyIPresume View Post

    The part of the attraction that was damaged was added on in 1999.
    Was this during the Pressler regime? That might explain

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by biggsworth View Post
    My first thought is they probably have cut back on maintenance to save money. With the multiple issues we actually see that just means hundreds now are not seen by us. This could just be a one off but I still have reservations about how the current management is maintaining the park.
    Exactly. And two facts are certain -- first, that since the Pressler regime Disney has accumulated a record of accidents caused by cutbacks in maintenance and staffing to increase profits; and second, that DLR staffing has been cut (again) this year to increase profits.

    Leave a comment:


  • F ticket
    replied
    Unfortunate that it seems like it takes a death for things to really change at Disney.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagleman
    replied
    Originally posted by Spongeocto4 View Post
    First, I'm glad no one was hurt(either above or below the bridge).

    Second, we don't know all the facts. Was the wood rotting? Was the guest applying too much force? We don't know.

    Even though we live in the age of Social Media, we still shouldn't rush to judgment and guess what happened.
    Agree with you.......
    #1........I'm glad no one was hurt(either above or below the bridge).
    and myself ,I like more facts what was going on......
    But....I do think there should be Cast Member ,
    staffed there for this exact reason-
    on every ride and attraction, keeping there eyes open....for such this kind of activity
    which it should be part of management maintaining the park.
    IMO

    Leave a comment:


  • DisneySpaceAce
    replied
    Originally posted by DisneyIPresume View Post

    The part of the attraction that was damaged was added on in 1999.
    I mean, that's still 20 years ago. Kind of a long time in theme park years.

    Leave a comment:

Get Away Today Footer

Collapse
Working...
X