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Disneyland by Reservation: Would you be opposed?

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  • Eagleman
    replied
    Originally posted by Sun Bonnet View Post
    And it is not just some slight inconvenience to require a reservation for the vast majority of people who don't keep "banker's hours". It is expecting locals to act as if Disneyland is a vacation for us. But it isn't. We go when we are able to, and often that's spur of the moment,
    This part of your statement
    I agree...........I'm now at age
    were it depends on the weather and the way I feel on a given day .
    Being a local that ,that does not live far from Knott's or Disneyland
    ,They are places to get away to.....but not same as one , that take a vacation there .
    So No for myself , I would not make
    reservation !

    Leave a comment:


  • Sun Bonnet
    replied
    Knotts and Universal offer a slight discount for buying online but in return they want you to select your date. As others have said this isn't about crowd control. It's an online promotion.

    And it is not just some slight inconvenience to require a reservation for the vast majority of people who don't keep "banker's hours". It is expecting locals to act as if Disneyland is a vacation for us. But it isn't. We go when we are able to, and often that's spur of the moment, I finished my project a little early or am waiting for feedback that won't come today so I have a little time to spare. Some of you think that locals are treated like elites by Disney because we get a loyalty discount (almost all businesses do this btw), but it is way more elitist to cater to people who can afford a vacation over regular folks who live in the area and keep the park open during the off season.

    When I was growing up, Disney closed at 7 p.m. at least half the year. It's because of us locals and our loyalty to the parks that the park now has the business to stay open late every night of the year. Disney World is a different story. It is set up to be a tourist resort and a bubble experience, but Disneyland has always just been a laidback park that is mostly visited by locals yet some vacationers in this thread think that because they spent X amount of dollars (only a portion of which actually went to Disney btw, bc the flights and maybe even hotel are separate) that locals should take a back seat to them. That is elitist AF. I don't go to where you live and expect to be treated better than the locals, just as I wouldn't go to Paris and expect Parisians to stay indoors because, to use Just Some Guy's logic, I spent so many dollars to visit THEIR home, but I want it all to myself. Give me a break.

    FTR, I am not anti-tourist. I am always nice and helpful to tourists every time I encounter them. I told JSG that I thought those who had a ticket in hand should be able to get in, just as AP holders were able to, and his reply was that all APs should have to reserve and tourists should be able to fill the parks first. I doubt I'd ever be able to go if that were the case because of the nature of my work hours, and I doubt I'm the only one.

    Leave a comment:


  • DisneySpaceAce
    replied
    Eh, while sometimes I plan trips if I'm staying at the hotel, considering I live in So Cal, I like being able to be like "Wanna go to Disneyland this weekend?" and just being able to go.

    Leave a comment:


  • Timopictures
    replied
    Originally posted by JustSomeGuy View Post

    Were your Disney tickets restricted to a certain specified day or days though, as in a reservation, where entry to the park is guaranteed? Or were they restricted to a certain series of open ended dates where you could be turned away if the park has reached capacity before you got there? The Universal tickets were restricted to 1 particular day that I had to choose prior to paying for the tickets, and they were only valid on that 1 day, as a reservation to enter. It wasn't a promotion, just simple tickets for one day purchased in advance.

    I just went to the Universal Studios site again this morning: I have confirmed, when buying General Admission One Day Passes, they require that you choose the day you will be visiting, and the tickets are only good for the day or multiple days you have chosen. Pricing varies by date, just like Disneyland.

    Ultimately, if Disneyland were to do this, combined with requiring AP Holders to make reservations, those of us who have committed to traveling from out of town, and are counting on entering the park on a certain day, would not be turned away at the gate on a day that has reached capacity if we bought tickets in advance. We would have already been counted as part of that capacity.

    Sorry if AP Holders would be mildly inconvenienced by making a reservation, but that's far less of an inconvenience than someone being turned away at the gate who has committed thousands of dollars to their visit from out of town. Those people are counting on accessing the park that day, since they don't have the luxury of shrugging their shoulders and saying, "Oh well, I guess I'll just come back another day."

    Here's a screenshot of one of my tickets from December:

    Click image for larger version Name:	Universal.png Views:	1 Size:	66.7 KB ID:	8610397
    Yes, a number of parks do what you’re describing. Six Flags and Cedar Fair do it when you buy tickets on their websites. But I believe this is for pricing/promotional purposes, not for crowd control. I don’t think they enforce any meaningful limit to the number of tickets sold for a certain day. And they sell lots of ticket categories that are unrestricted. For example, you can pay a a little more for “Anytime Admission” at Universal.

    I don’t even really think they would consider these date-specific tickets to be a “reservation.” I would be curious to see what would happen if you had purchased these kind of tickets for a busy date that saw a capacity closure. Would they let you in because you had a date-specific ticket? My guess would be no, but you would probably be allowed to switch your date.

    What I would like to see is a system of date-specific tickets that also came with an actual limit that kept attendance down to reasonable levels. I’d say pleasant levels, but that’s probably too much to ever hope for.

    Leave a comment:


  • JustSomeGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Timopictures View Post

    Yes, but I imagine this is just for pricing/promotional reasons or because they were multi-day tickets, not because there was a cap on tickets for that day. I just booked a Disney trip and the tickets were assigned for certain days.
    Were your Disney tickets restricted to a certain specified day or days though, as in a reservation, where entry to the park is guaranteed? Or were they restricted to a certain series of open ended dates where you could be turned away if the park has reached capacity before you got there? The Universal tickets were restricted to 1 particular day that I had to choose prior to paying for the tickets, and they were only valid on that 1 day, as a reservation to enter. It wasn't a promotion, just simple tickets for one day purchased in advance.

    I just went to the Universal Studios site again this morning: I have confirmed, when buying General Admission One Day Passes, they require that you choose the day you will be visiting, and the tickets are only good for the day or multiple days you have chosen. Pricing varies by date, just like Disneyland.

    Ultimately, if Disneyland were to do this, combined with requiring AP Holders to make reservations, those of us who have committed to traveling from out of town, and are counting on entering the park on a certain day, would not be turned away at the gate on a day that has reached capacity if we bought tickets in advance. We would have already been counted as part of that capacity.

    Sorry if AP Holders would be mildly inconvenienced by making a reservation, but that's far less of an inconvenience than someone being turned away at the gate who has committed thousands of dollars to their visit from out of town. Those people are counting on accessing the park that day, since they don't have the luxury of shrugging their shoulders and saying, "Oh well, I guess I'll just come back another day."

    Here's a screenshot of one of my tickets from December:

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Universal.png Views:	1 Size:	66.7 KB ID:	8610397
    Last edited by JustSomeGuy; 01-10-2020, 07:24 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • JustSomeGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Sun Bonnet View Post

    Yeah, but I'll bet locals and passholders could still go in without reserving.
    I was merely stating a fact... But thank you for your conjecture. My point was when buying a day pass for Universal, in advance, I was required to choose what day it would be. There was nothing special about it, no promotion, nothing. Just a regular day pass bought in advance. I have no idea how they address passholder visits... That wasn't the point of my comment.
    Last edited by JustSomeGuy; 01-10-2020, 06:10 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sun Bonnet
    replied
    Originally posted by JustSomeGuy View Post

    Universal Studios already does it. I bought tickets last October for our visit in December, and they were only valid on a specific day of my choosing.
    Yeah, but I'll bet locals and passholders could still go in without reserving.

    Leave a comment:


  • Timopictures
    replied
    Originally posted by JustSomeGuy View Post

    Universal Studios already does it. I bought tickets last October for our visit in December, and they were only valid on a specific day of my choosing.
    Yes, but I imagine this is just for pricing/promotional reasons or because they were multi-day tickets, not because there was a cap on tickets for that day. I just booked a Disney trip and the tickets were assigned for certain days.

    Leave a comment:


  • JustSomeGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Timopictures View Post
    I have long thought that this is one of the few ways to realistically control the crowd-feel and lines in the parks. I would love to see Disney or a competitor try something like this, although I doubt it will happen anytime soon.
    Universal Studios already does it. I bought tickets last October for our visit in December, and they were only valid on a specific day of my choosing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Timopictures
    replied
    I have long thought that this is one of the few ways to realistically control the crowd-feel and lines in the parks. I would love to see Disney or a competitor try something like this, although I doubt it will happen anytime soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagleman
    replied
    Originally posted by tarheelalum View Post

    I bet they would have sold people Sig+ passes on the days they wouldn't sell regular tickets.
    I Bet- that your right !
    lol

    Leave a comment:


  • tarheelalum
    replied
    Originally posted by Sun Bonnet View Post

    To be fair, the difference in days between Signature and Signature Plus is those two weeks around Christmas. Those passholders paid in advance for their entry. It's not favoritism to give people what they already paid for.
    I bet they would have sold people Sig+ passes on the days they wouldn't sell regular tickets.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagleman
    replied
    Originally posted by Kikdenn View Post

    I felt the same way when we last visited a year ago. It seemed to us that we were asked that question much more frequently, compared to past years.

    I started feeling the pity eyes as my purchase rang up at full price. “Oh, not an AP? Well, that is a shame. The poor thing.”

    It’s like when you’re on vacation and you shop at an unfamiliar grocery store. They ask for your “special savings loyal customer” card and you’ve got nothing. The cashier shakes their head while they ring up your box of Frosted Flakes for 7.99.

    It’s tacky at both Disneyland and the grocery store.
    I know the feeling.......
    ( IMO it get be to much )
    Dang how many
    “special savings loyal customer” card s


    you want in the wallet.....?

    I think there some very good points , being made here
    on both side of fence.........
    But let be truthful....to Disney or any other theme /amusement parks cross the country,
    it more about MONEY and less about fairness .
    Last edited by Eagleman; 01-08-2020, 04:30 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • JustSomeGuy
    replied
    Here’s how I think it should work, which is more or less in line with the OP-

    Advanced Ticket Sales:
    Advanced Ticket sales are valid only on specified days. Tickets are available for purchase only if the Park has not reached maximum occupancy for that future date. (Access to the Park that day is guaranteed after purchase)
    If the Ticket Holder does not show up or cancel within a specified time-frame, the purchase is forfeit.

    AP Holders (All Levels):
    AP Holders are required to make a reservation for the days they plan to visit. Reservations are available providing the Park has not already reached maximum occupancy for the future date. (Access to the Park that day is guaranteed after reservation)
    If the AP Holder does not show up or cancel within a specified time-frame, they are charged a regular day’s admission fee using the account associated to the AP.
    If an AP Holder attempts to make a reservation on a day that is full, they are offered an opportunity to schedule a reservation on a day that would normally be blocked out for that AP. The free “block-out day allowance” could be used any time within the year. It would appear as a “credit” toward future use.

    Note: Advanced Ticket Sales and AP Reservations are each allotted a separate percentage of available tickets/reservations to determine Park Capacity.

    Same Day Ticket Purchase:
    Tickets are available to purchase on the day of admission as long as the park has not reached maximum capacity in Advanced Ticket sales or AP Reservations.
    Once a Same Day ticket has been purchased, access to the Park that day is guaranteed.

    Seems pretty simple to me!
    Last edited by JustSomeGuy; 01-09-2020, 05:57 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sun Bonnet
    replied
    Originally posted by JustSomeGuy View Post

    He also said "but continued to allow Signature Plus APs admission."

    I took that to mean that Signature Plus APs were allowed in the park while they turned away everyone else with a ticket, meaning that a ticket holder and the Signature Plus passholder are NOT in the same position in this scenario.

    I spoke to someone who had a ticket that were denied access at the gate, and instead were sent to DCA.

    If in fact Signature APs were allowed admission while Ticket Holders who hadn't been in the park yet were denied access, that in my opinion is not fair.
    I agree with you. If that happened, it's not fair, but from what I read at the time, it was just new tickets not being sold. In fact, I thought I had read that people who had been in DCA were still allowed to park hop over to DL during the time they weren't selling new tickets, but I can't confirm that. FTR, I'm an AP, but my pass was blocked during Christmas so I wasn't there. It's my opinion that during heavy crowding, it's absolutely acceptable for Disney to contain crowds to only those who already have a ticket, whether it's one they purchased for the day or days or an unblocked passholder. But I agree it's unfair if they aren't treating those with tickets equally across the board.

    Leave a comment:


  • JustSomeGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Sun Bonnet View Post

    The poster I quoted did not say anything about hotel guests who pre-purchased tickets. He said they stopped SELLING NEW SAME-DAY TICKETS. At some point, they had to stop selling tickets during Christmas week. That doesn't mean guests who already had a ticket shouldn't be allowed in. Your family and the Signature Plus passholder are in the same position in this scenario.
    He also said "but continued to allow Signature Plus APs admission."

    I took that to mean that Signature Plus APs were allowed in the park while they turned away everyone else with a ticket, meaning that a ticket holder and the Signature Plus passholder are NOT in the same position in this scenario.

    I spoke to someone who had a ticket that were denied access at the gate, and instead were sent to DCA.

    If in fact Signature APs were allowed admission while Ticket Holders who hadn't been in the park yet were denied access, that in my opinion is not fair.
    Last edited by JustSomeGuy; 01-08-2020, 12:35 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kikdenn
    replied
    Originally posted by wlc View Post

    On a related (but side) note, last time I was there (November) I had an out-of-state guest with me. She made a remark later on about how the food and shops kept asking her if she had an AP for a discount, and that it felt very tacky like some of the magic had been lost as she felt more second-class.
    I felt the same way when we last visited a year ago. It seemed to us that we were asked that question much more frequently, compared to past years.

    I started feeling the pity eyes as my purchase rang up at full price. “Oh, not an AP? Well, that is a shame. The poor thing.”

    It’s like when you’re on vacation and you shop at an unfamiliar grocery store. They ask for your “special savings loyal customer” card and you’ve got nothing. The cashier shakes their head while they ring up your box of Frosted Flakes for 7.99.

    It’s tacky at both Disneyland and the grocery store.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sun Bonnet
    replied
    Originally posted by JustSomeGuy View Post

    What about the non-APs who bought their tickets weeks or months in advance, flew in from out of town, and paid for hotels? They were denied access to the park. How is that fair?
    The poster I quoted did not say anything about hotel guests who pre-purchased tickets. He said they stopped SELLING NEW SAME-DAY TICKETS. At some point, they had to stop selling tickets during Christmas week. That doesn't mean guests who already had a ticket shouldn't be allowed in. Your family and the Signature Plus passholder are in the same position in this scenario.

    Leave a comment:


  • JustSomeGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Sun Bonnet View Post

    To be fair, the difference in days between Signature and Signature Plus is those two weeks around Christmas. Those passholders paid in advance for their entry. It's not favoritism to give people what they already paid for.
    What about the non-APs who bought their tickets weeks or months in advance, flew in from out of town, and paid for hotels? They were denied access to the park. How is that fair?

    I can tell you that when I visit the Park, I spend over $6000 for 3 days for a family of four, after airfare, hotel, food, merch and tickets (purchased months in advance) are all paid for. That being said, I expect to get in the gate on the 1st day of my visit!
    Last edited by JustSomeGuy; 01-08-2020, 11:14 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sun Bonnet
    replied
    Originally posted by Golden Zephyr View Post

    Yes you are absolutely right and in fact on the last closure this past Christmastime they STOPPED selling new day tickets, but continued to allow Signature Plus APs admission.

    No new day tickets but those Sig+ holders who spent a fortune allowed entry into Disneyland. That should clearly state where they fall in the hierarchy according to Disney. Anyone can become a signature plus AP if you are willing to commit the money to Disney.
    To be fair, the difference in days between Signature and Signature Plus is those two weeks around Christmas. Those passholders paid in advance for their entry. It's not favoritism to give people what they already paid for.

    Leave a comment:

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