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Fundamental changes to the Disneyland Resort

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  • Fundamental changes to the Disneyland Resort

    So many amazing Disneyland experts on this board and endless ideas and imagination... What sort of changes to you see happening to the Disneyland Resort as a result of this crisis?

    When the park opens back up, what sorts of things do you think might be fundamentally changed, possibly forever?

    I'll start with two -
    • Queues and Virtual Queues
      • I think that virtual queues are going to be the way forward. The idea has been bandied about, but I can not see people tolerating standing around in line with people, coughing, sneezing, and the like in the future. The awareness and fear of germs is so high now it is going to change that mentality.
      • I see many things going to a virtual queue system where people don't have to be in close quarters with hoards of crowds anymore and will demand return times for rides to be processed in smaller boarding groups.
    • Parades and Spectaculars -
      • will people want to be crowded in close quarters to watch these shows in the future? How might Disney handle it? What ideas would you have?

    I think there are many many things to consider. I'd love to hear what the MC crew thinks about what the Disneyland Resort might look like when it reopens and how might operations be different.

  • #2
    This is a once in a generation event...while there most likely will be some short term mitigation measures until it truly passes, I suspect it will be back to business as usual pretty quickly..

    Now this very well may advance some new technology or be the catalyst for a paradigm shift in how guests tour the parks, but that would be more taking advantage of the situation to permit change with less pushback vs being a reaction to it IMO.

    While global virtual queues are a nice idea, guests stacked in queues are actually a critical part of overall park attendance capacity. They bank on a large amount of guests being in line at any one given time in determining park capacity.

    Comment


    • #3
      They’ll have to cancel shows, parades, and Fantasmic!/World of Color for some time.

      They might be able to have the fireworks if they keep it simple like Fantasy In The Sky, and they discourage people from congregating to watch it. Since the fireworks shows are literally in the sky there is no need for that unless they cordon off a viewing area and ensure social distancing is maintained.

      Comment


      • #4
        Theme parks in general, and Disney's in particular, are viable businesses because the public associates them with fun and happiness. To enter a Disney theme park is to enter a bubble of safety and security, leaving the worries of the world outside. I wonder how deeply the COVID crisis will alter those associations, and for how long.

        I posted in another thread that in remembering the flap last year when just one person with measles was suspected of exposing hundreds of other visitors to the disease, I wonder if the basic concept of a day at a theme park -- which requires visitors to crowd into ride vehicles with strangers who come from everywhere in the world -- will be associated with sickness and death for years after the COVID crisis has passed its peak, leaving hundreds of thousands dead across the U.S. and millions around the world.


        "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
        it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
        together with every variety of recreation and fun,
        designed to appeal to everyone."

        - Walt Disney

        "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
        - Michael Eisner

        "It's very symbiotic."
        - Bob Chapek

        Comment


        • #5
          The virtual queue system, by itself, I don't think will be effective on a mass scale because those people aren't going to disappear. If they're not in the lines, they'll be in the walkways, stores, restaurants, etc. Where it could be effective is if it is used in concert with a reservation system and/or lowered capacity limits. For years, the Disney execs have sought to fill the parks to maximum capacity as much as possible. They wanted and loved crowding. That could be an issue now since many may be far more inclined to avoid places that are associated with overcrowding. It should be interesting to see what happens when the parks eventually re-open.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
            I posted in another thread that in remembering the flap last year when just one person with measles was suspected of exposing hundreds of other visitors to the disease,
            While there was a lot of media sensationalism about that...did people really care once the perceived treat passed or it have an impact on park attendance? This too will pass.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DisneyPilot View Post

              While there was a lot of media sensationalism about that...did people really care once the perceived treat passed or it have an impact on park attendance? This too will pass.
              The perceived threat did not have much of an impact as we all know. But people didn’t have to stay safe at home and there were no shortages of essential supplies at that time either.

              Comment


              • #8
                I think the idea of virtual queues sounds interesting on paper, but wouldn't guests simply find other areas to congregate while waiting causing restaurants and shops to become overly crowded?
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DisneyIPresume View Post
                  The perceived threat did not have much of an impact as we all know. But people didn’t have to stay safe at home and there were no shortages of essential supplies at that time either.
                  And that's exactly the point. One person with measles at Disneyland made headlines. Just measles. A disease that's well known and has strong herd immunity holding it in check after decades of mass vaccination. Had anyone contracted it at Disneyland, they would have been treated by a health care system that wasn't being buried in measles cases.

                  In contrast, COVID-19 is a highly communicable virus for which we have no herd immunity, no vaccine, no national policy to fight it, and a health care system that is quickly being overwhelmed.


                  Coronavirus hospitalizations have doubled in California over last three days

                  "Between Friday and Monday, the number of California patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in intensive-care beds nearly tripled to 597 from 200. The number of hospitalizations has nearly doubled, from 746 to 1,432.

                  Officials said the state’s modeling suggests California will need 50,000 new hospital beds by mid-May."



                  'We are slowly descending into chaos,' Miami doctor says

                  "Many people on the front lines of the national heath care crisis against Covid-19 are feeling frustrated -- and ill -- in the battle against the novel coronavirus.

                  The number of cases hasn't slowed down nationally. More than 160,000 people in the United States have been infected with coronavirus, and more than 2,900 have died.

                  Each day sees more reports of deaths than the previous day. There were more than 500 reports of deaths from coronavirus on Monday, the most death reports in a single day in the United States.

                  More than one out of every six US deaths reported during the coronavirus crisis was reported Monday.

                  Hundreds of medical workers across the country have fallen sick and hospitals face dire shortages of protective gear.

                  'We are slowly descending into chaos,' a trauma physician at Miami's Jackson Memorial Hospital said."



                  The United states is heading for a prolonged period of what Italy is going through now. How long it will be before we emerge from it -- and how the national psyche will view the notion of sitting shoulder-to-shoulder with strangers on theme park rides -- can only be speculated on.

                  But I doubt that theme parks in general will be financially viable for their owners anytime in the near future.
                  Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 03-30-2020, 06:30 PM.
                  "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                  it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                  together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                  designed to appeal to everyone."

                  - Walt Disney

                  "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                  - Michael Eisner

                  "It's very symbiotic."
                  - Bob Chapek

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    maybe a bit more respect for middle class folks...just a hope for the future...
                    I am old. But still love Disneyland.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Another unknown is the possibility that guests, especially frequent ones, could visit less often because they have been forced to stay away and might get the idea that things like DL are not as important as they once were.

                      The same goes for other types of entertainment as well.

                      It's possible that places like DL will need to adapt to smaller crowds and cater more to new guests rather than relying on the steady flow of regular visitors that they're used to.

                      Pure speculation though, no one knows what will actually happen..........

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        While entertainment may be hypothetically be cut back, I think Magic Happens will still be performed in Disneyland, as it just premiered. Maybe once a day. Fireworks, I could see being booted to weekends only. Even in the summertime. Dito for WoC and Fantasmic, as well

                        Then there's Avengers Campus....
                        I predict the Spidey Show and/ Doctor Strange show will be cut. The Spidey AA will be shown for the press opening and then vanish from public sight for an unforseeable future. The Avengers E ticket will be put on hold (again).

                        MMRR, who knows? Though, I don't see it being scrapped. The DVC Disneyland Hotel unit will be 'shelved', on the other hand. Nothing else new will be planned or announced until 2021, at the earliest. Meaning no Hollywoodland or Tomorrowland revamp or Galaxy's Edge Expansion/improvements.

                        I also expect some vacancies in Downtown Disney.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yes, I think Downtown Disney will suffer too.

                          I can't even imagine what the rent there must be but I'd bet anything it's in the stratosphere.......

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think there's a 10% chance for one massive change to take place as a result. It's one that people have called for before on these boards without realizing the huge consequences of it happening.

                            Capped Entry.

                            Think about it, it's the only way to truly assure- in the short term- that there's adequate space for social distancing and meter out the ride flow without clogging people into queues. It's being seeded into Disney planning via the Flex Pass in Disneyland and has been a long time coming for Disneyworld, with how every bit of minutiae must be mapped for your days in Orlando.

                            Having guests reserve their visit in advance, and capping the total amount of visitors inside let's Disney control the crowd in a whole new way- and more importantly- sell the planning of their day back to them. (Something they've been itching to force onto Anaheim since the conversion into a "Resort.")

                            And it goes without saying that capping entry allows for a sharp hike in prices since reducing the total number of bodies in the park means they'd want to increase the take from each admitted guest.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Reef Pilot mentioned possibly introducing capped entry. Just in general, it will be super interesting to watch what does come out of this crisis. If Disney has been unhappy with any part of its business model, now is a perfect chance for them to fix it. People will accept and forgive just about anything during this extraordinary crisis.
                              They really do have an opportunity to mitigate some of the "controlled chaos" that has been the parks in recent years.

                              Or they can just go on with business as usual, with the introduction of extreme cuts to make up for lost income.

                              I hope they get creative!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Nothing will change.
                                "And yes, we implore EVERYBODY to follow the park rules. Having off-ride footage is great, but any still photo's or video's taken ON the coasters at SFMM are strictly against the rules. They are there for your (and everybody's) safety." "Six Flags doesn't allow ANY loose articles on their coasters, and they don't allow video taping on their coasters. " BUT, "​ This is not true. Six Flags does not allow ANY On-Ride video or pictures on the rides. The ONLY way is if you get explicit permission from Park Management." ???

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Reef Pilot View Post
                                  I think there's a 10% chance for one massive change to take place as a result. It's one that people have called for before on these boards without realizing the huge consequences of it happening.

                                  Capped Entry.

                                  Think about it, it's the only way to truly assure- in the short term- that there's adequate space for social distancing and meter out the ride flow without clogging people into queues. It's being seeded into Disney planning via the Flex Pass in Disneyland and has been a long time coming for Disneyworld, with how every bit of minutiae must be mapped for your days in Orlando.

                                  Having guests reserve their visit in advance, and capping the total amount of visitors inside let's Disney control the crowd in a whole new way- and more importantly- sell the planning of their day back to them. (Something they've been itching to force onto Anaheim since the conversion into a "Resort.")

                                  And it goes without saying that capping entry allows for a sharp hike in prices since reducing the total number of bodies in the park means they'd want to increase the take from each admitted guest.
                                  I completely agree that they will have to do some kind of capped entry for the reopening period, as they are going to need to do virtual queues Park wide. If nobody is being held out of the walkways by being in a queue the park will be too full.
                                  ​​​​​​
                                  I know it's an unpopular topic but they will have to restrict access and that means that they will not be able to accommodate everyone - so they will have to find a way to limit entry and the most likely way is by restricting to timed, dated tickets only. Maybe they create a option similar to the flex pass for every pass level so they aren't left out and can request access. I could easily see suspension of all pass sales except a modified flex for the time being since they can't deliver what those promise. But they cannot under any circumstance have the lines we saw prior to the closure.

                                  There are some products coming out that could be a help to sanitation in a park like Disneyland, such as 24 hour Microban sprays that protect surfaces from viruses and bacteria. Infrared temperature checks are instant and many workplaces are adding right now, in fact Walmart announced today that they are instituting infrared temp checks on all employees and will send anyone with a fever of 100.0 or more home. As this becomes commonplace at other employers it will easily become a requirement for passage through security at the parks.

                                  One advantage that Orlando has over Anaheim on many rides is that the unload stations are well separated from the load, so they have options to install UV sterilizers that the ride vehicles go through before the next passengers go on board. That won't be an option in Anaheim on most rides that have combined load/unload stations. (Think Haunted Mansion and ROTR are good candidates for such a setup).

                                  They definitely won't be set up to maximize their profit as they were before, but they will find a way to safely operate and get revenue flowing through the organization again.
                                  ​​​

                                  ​​​

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    There are a lot of inaccurate assumptions being made about the virus spread and potential mitigation steps forward...expect for a cough or sneeze projected airborne you generally do not catch a virus simply by being in close proximity to another human. Regardless of social distance between people think about how many things your touch in the park, in the queue, getting on the attractions, share food/drinks, condiment bar, dining in the restaurants, shopping, even opening trash receptacles...that is where the actual risk of likely transmission happens and no amount of social distancing or attendance caps really prevents that. That requires an awareness and shift in personal behavior.
                                    Last edited by DisneyPilot; 03-31-2020, 10:57 AM.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by DisneyPilot View Post
                                      There are a lot of inaccurate assumptions being made about the virus spread and potential mitigation steps forward...expect for a cough or sneeze projected airborne you generally do not catch a virus simply by being in close proximity to another human. Regardless of social distance between people think about how many things your touch in the park, in the queue, getting on the attractions, share food/drinks, condiment bar, dining in the restaurants, shopping, even opening trash receptacles...that is where the actual transmission happens and no amount of social distancing or attendance caps really prevents that. That requires an awareness and shift in personal behavior.
                                      Right. So, those containers of condiment packages and utensils that anyone can touch (or sneeze on) before you take one...probably a bad idea going forward. Unless they are wrapped and you wash your hands before eating (should Disney provide disposable wet wipes everywhere?)
                                      Dumbo rats: the other lovable rodents.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Reef Pilot View Post
                                        I think there's a 10% chance for one massive change to take place as a result. It's one that people have called for before on these boards without realizing the huge consequences of it happening.

                                        Capped Entry.

                                        Think about it, it's the only way to truly assure- in the short term- that there's adequate space for social distancing and meter out the ride flow without clogging people into queues. It's being seeded into Disney planning via the Flex Pass in Disneyland and has been a long time coming for Disneyworld, with how every bit of minutiae must be mapped for your days in Orlando.

                                        Having guests reserve their visit in advance, and capping the total amount of visitors inside let's Disney control the crowd in a whole new way- and more importantly- sell the planning of their day back to them. (Something they've been itching to force onto Anaheim since the conversion into a "Resort.")

                                        And it goes without saying that capping entry allows for a sharp hike in prices since reducing the total number of bodies in the park means they'd want to increase the take from each admitted guest.
                                        The biggest factor in this, is the out of state/country tourists. The cap entry would work for APs, but not your average tourist. Disney could hypothetically guarantee entry for resort hotel guests, but this would still hurt out of state guests who are not on property and local non-disney hotels.

                                        Comment

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