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  • Mickey’s Trailer

    Subject change.

    So my 2 year old has never seen a Mickey cartoon (Loves mickey for some reason, I think it’s the Apple Watch face, and some of his/my shirts) so I thought I would start right with an old school one, Mickey’s Trailer. I forgot how violent they are, I mean for a 2 year old, but he was mesmerized.

    The thing is, in the beginning there is a scene where the trailer is driving and Mickey gets water out of a waterfall before going into a tunnel, it looked just like the waterfall and turn in Radiator Springs Racers, was it an inspiration?
    Last edited by brian11811; 04-01-2020, 09:31 PM.

  • #2

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    • #3
      The falls in RSR are based on Multnomah Falls in Oregon, even down to the bridge.

      Yes, lots of old cartoons are really violent, and many are really 'not in keeping with today's ethics'. I know my sons watched a lot of old Warner Bros et al cartoons and I often thought "Boy, I don't remember them being that 'bad'!". But they've both grown up to be good ethical citizens of the world. It's all about teachable moments, isn't it?
      "Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.​"

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      • #4
        Ah, I was way off then. Reminds me of it though.

        Yes. My son is used to Sesame Street and Cliffords Puppy Days. No violent fights between Ernie and Bert. I think the old violent Disney cartoons are hilarious, but I think he need to ease into it. I realize for kids, when they are that young they don’t even know why something is funny. A Piano falling on someone’s head? Why not? I had to explain Donald Duck is always mad that’s why he’s quacking so loud.

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        • #5
          People often tend to forget that the cartoons and other shows a child watches are only one of many influences that impact the child’s behavior and development. The most important by far is the parents, and how they interact, teach, and guide the child every moment of every day.
          That said, what many people forget, or may not be aware of, is the old cartoons weren’t made for children alone. They were not broadcast on channels for children at specific times for children. They weren’t even shown on tv at all, because there was no tv back then. They were shown in the movie theaters as part of an entire movie package. Way back in the day, you didn’t just see previews, a couple of commercials, and one movie.An evening at the theater meant a cartoon, often a short subject, previews, a news reel, an A feature and a B feature.
          The cartoons we’re made for many ages to be entertained. That meant more violence. There also was not any type of rating system to guide the appropriateness of what was seen. Just compare some of those old, black and white Popeye cartoons to the newer color ones (Which could still get fairly violent), or the MGM Tom and Jerry cartoons of the 40s to the ones made in the 70s with virtually no violence. The cartoons really started to become much less violent in the 50s and 60s, as they started to be made for tv.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by sbk1234 View Post
            People often tend to forget that the cartoons and other shows a child watches are only one of many influences that impact the child’s behavior and development. The most important by far is the parents, and how they interact, teach, and guide the child every moment of every day.
            That said, what many people forget, or may not be aware of, is the old cartoons weren’t made for children alone. They were not broadcast on channels for children at specific times for children. They weren’t even shown on tv at all, because there was no tv back then. They were shown in the movie theaters as part of an entire movie package. Way back in the day, you didn’t just see previews, a couple of commercials, and one movie.An evening at the theater meant a cartoon, often a short subject, previews, a news reel, an A feature and a B feature.
            The cartoons we’re made for many ages to be entertained. That meant more violence. There also was not any type of rating system to guide the appropriateness of what was seen. Just compare some of those old, black and white Popeye cartoons to the newer color ones (Which could still get fairly violent), or the MGM Tom and Jerry cartoons of the 40s to the ones made in the 70s with virtually no violence. The cartoons really started to become much less violent in the 50s and 60s, as they started to be made for tv.
            You just saved me from a lot of typing. One minor correction though - the cartoons produced during the so-called production era were all subject to approval from the Production Code (also known as the Breen and/or Hays Code). Essentially, this was Hollywood trying to self-censor itself to avoid the hassle of various local censor boards across the country and world. A form of this code existed as early as the 1920s, but it wasn't really until 1934 when it was enforced, and it was in force until the 1960s (even though its influence started waning in the late 1950s). One example of Disney having to deal with the Production Code was when there were objections over the topless centaurettes in Fantasia! That said, many animators loved finding ways of flouting the code. One blatant example is in the 1942 Looney Tunes cartoon A Tale of Two Kitties - Babbitt: Give me the bird! (referring to Tweety). Catstello: If the Hays Code would allow me, I'd give him the boid.

            To add to your violent examples of Popeye and Tom and Jerry, I'll add the 1940s era Woody Woodpecker and the Tex Avery directed cartoons. You really have to wonder how in the world Avery's Red Hot Riding Hood got by the censors. The Disney cartoons, by comparison, are tame, but they do have their share of violent moments (Hockey Homicide for example). This violence didn't come out of a vacuum. It all makes sense when you consider the sound era cartoons as the successor to the silent era slaptstick comedies.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Zorro View Post

              You just saved me from a lot of typing. One minor correction though - the cartoons produced during the so-called production era were all subject to approval from the Production Code (also known as the Breen and/or Hays Code). Essentially, this was Hollywood trying to self-censor itself to avoid the hassle of various local censor boards across the country and world. A form of this code existed as early as the 1920s, but it wasn't really until 1934 when it was enforced, and it was in force until the 1960s (even though its influence started waning in the late 1950s). One example of Disney having to deal with the Production Code was when there were objections over the topless centaurettes in Fantasia! That said, many animators loved finding ways of flouting the code. One blatant example is in the 1942 Looney Tunes cartoon A Tale of Two Kitties - Babbitt: Give me the bird! (referring to Tweety). Catstello: If the Hays Code would allow me, I'd give him the boid.

              To add to your violent examples of Popeye and Tom and Jerry, I'll add the 1940s era Woody Woodpecker and the Tex Avery directed cartoons. You really have to wonder how in the world Avery's Red Hot Riding Hood got by the censors. The Disney cartoons, by comparison, are tame, but they do have their share of violent moments (Hockey Homicide for example). This violence didn't come out of a vacuum. It all makes sense when you consider the sound era cartoons as the successor to the silent era slaptstick comedies.
              Thanks for the clarification. Lots of good information.
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              Comment


              • #8
                I watched all that stuff as a kid in the late 70s early 80s and I turned out mostly ok. I would also add 3 stooges to that list, so I guess it is the same thing. If you watch the earlier shows from like 1938 they are a lot more racey and violent. Actually a lot of those late 30s films had subjects and double entendres that hold up today.

                I knew the film history part, but I never delved into the animation history. I did the technical aspect but not the subject/story lines of early animation. Interesting.

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