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Former C.E.O. Robert Iger Discusses Screening Guests

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  • News Former C.E.O. Robert Iger Discusses Screening Guests

    “We’re studying very carefully what China has been trying to do in terms of their return to normalcy,” Iger noted. “And one of the things that’s obvious is they’ve conscripted a large segment of their population to monitor others in terms of their health. You can’t get on a bus or a subway or a train or enter a high-rise building there—and I’m sure this will be the case when their schools reopen—without having your temperature taken.”


    “Just as we now do bag checks for everybody that goes into our parks, it could be that at some point we add a component of that that takes people’s temperatures, as a for-instance.”


    Iger added: “So we’ve asked ourselves the question, let’s prepare for a world where our customers demand that we scrutinize everybody. Even if it creates a little bit of hardship like it takes a little bit longer for people to get in. Just as the case after 9/11 where people ultimately lived with the notion that in order for them to enter a building, if you’re in an office building you have to show a picture ID or get your picture taken and be screened. Or in order to enter a park, you have to put your bags out there to be checked and you go through some kind of metal detector. Or certainly what’s going on in airports with the TSA.”
    Will Disney Parks impelement a new health screening process for guests when the theme parks reopen? Bob Iger shares his ideas.

  • #2
    Yeah, let's follow China's example on how they "conscript" their citizenry to monitor others. To me, in my opinion, this is not like post 9/11. The terror threat is ever present. A mass shooting threat is ever present. That is why you would continue to have back check or metal detectors. A worldwide pandemic is not ever present. Once it goes away, or once there is a vaccine, I see no need to test people for something that is not going around. We've kissed all our other privacy rights away. I guess we can kiss our health privacy rights away too.

    Comment


    • #3
      Disney's premises are private property. The company can institute whatever screening is necessary to protect public health.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist View Post
        Disney's premises are private property. The company can institute whatever screening is necessary to protect public health.
        i don't think I said they couldn't.

        Comment


        • #5
          Americans have a right to healthcare privacy. Otherwise HIPAA should be repealed.

          So let's assume that being a private company Disney can screen their guests for a virus. How do they go about doing this discreetly and in a way that ensures this privacy in front of other guests. If they do this at bag check in front of everyone are they going to deny entry at that point? That is a huge lawsuit waiting to happen if this is done in front of others. I agree guests should be screened but it must be done discreetly and with their permission or it should not be done at all.

          Comment


          • #6
            To me they can take my temperature, It is their property. if we don't like that we aren't giving up our rights at all. We simply just don't visit their property if we don't agree. People are selfish enough to try in enter the parks when they aren't feeling well and expose everyone to their virus. Now in the case of this virus it is a moot point as you can transmit it without symptoms anyways. Being in an industry where HIPPA is our thing there could be ways to change the wording of this act to help in these scenarios. A company should be able to protect itself from a health security compromise with someone entering the park with a temp.
            These are some of my favorite TRs I have posted

            DL 55th BDAY trip report
            My company had a special night at the park
            WdW trip report with WWoHP
            NYE 2011 trip report
            Mice Chat 7th anniversary
            Leap year 24 hour report
            New DCA trip report
            NYE 2012
            HKDL trip report

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DisneyIPresume View Post
              Americans have a right to healthcare privacy. Otherwise HIPAA should be repealed.

              So let's assume that being a private company Disney can screen their guests for a virus. How do they go about doing this discreetly and in a way that ensures this privacy in front of other guests. If they do this at bag check in front of everyone are they going to deny entry at that point? That is a huge lawsuit waiting to happen if this is done in front of others. I agree guests should be screened but it must be done discreetly and with their permission or it should not be done at all.
              HIPAA applies to healthcare organizations, other businesses are not covered by it. The closest you could get is ADA violation if somehow you had a disability that triggered a rejection, but as some one who doesn't know every condition ever to exist don't know of conditions besides sicknesses that raise body temperature. If you are going to a checkpoint voluntarily you are already provided Disney with permission to check you.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by PragmaticIdealist, quoting Bob Iger
                “Just as we now do bag checks for everybody that goes into our parks, it could be that at some point we add a component of that that takes people’s temperatures, as a for-instance.”
                The medical experts have made it clear that having a normal temperature is not a valid test for the absence of COVID-19. A person can be infected and be spreading the virus for up to two weeks without showing any symptoms.

                Legal issues about invasion of personal privacy wouldn't be Disney's concern. Instead, they'll want to protect themselves against lawsuits by people who claim to have caught COVID-19 on Disney property. That's why Disney's domestic parks, hotels and cruise ships won't open until Disney Legal signs off on it -- and Legal won't sign off until they've hired a legion of infectious disease experts to advise them on screening methods.
                Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 04-07-2020, 01:37 PM.
                "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                designed to appeal to everyone."

                - Walt Disney

                "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                - Michael Eisner

                "It's very symbiotic."
                - Bob Chapek

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by hbdad View Post

                  i don't think I said they couldn't.
                  What you said was: "We've kissed all our other privacy rights away. I guess we can kiss our health privacy rights away too." There are no privacy rights at Disney because it is a private company

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I don't mind the temperature sensors. I've lived through that and in most cases, you're just walking past a sensor and will only be pulled aside for individual screening if it alerts the workers who are monitoring it that someone who passed by has a high temperature reading.

                    Now, it is true that temperature screenings won't catch all Covid-19 cases because of the long incubation period, but it would catch some and it might catch other illnesses, such as people who enter the parks with flu. I think this is a good thing.
                    "I wish they all could be California Bears!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JacksonP View Post
                      What you said was: "We've kissed all our other privacy rights away. I guess we can kiss our health privacy rights away too." There are no privacy rights at Disney because it is a private company
                      Exactly right. In addition to the fact that Disney is a private company, states of emergency exist locally in Orange County and statewide in California -- and yet a segment of our population remains willfully ignorant of the meaning of "state of emergency," and insists that their interpretation of "personal rights" is the only valid interpretation.
                      "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                      it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                      together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                      designed to appeal to everyone."

                      - Walt Disney

                      "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                      - Michael Eisner

                      "It's very symbiotic."
                      - Bob Chapek

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sun Bonnet View Post
                        ...Now, it is true that temperature screenings won't catch all Covid-19 cases because of the long incubation period, but it would catch some and it might catch other illnesses, such as people who enter the parks with flu. I think this is a good thing.
                        Very true. And yet one infected symptomless person at Disneyland could infect thousands in a day: The studies thus far indicate that 25% to 50% of COVID-19 carriers are asymptomatic for up to 14 days, during which period they can infect others with the virus simply by speaking. Anyone familiar with the iron fist that Disney Legal wields at TDB knows that Legal won't allow customers or employees to enter their properties without airtight testing procedures that have been approved by an army of medical consultants. (Whether Finance will declare such procedures financially viable is another issue.)

                        Bottom line, Iger isn't doing the Company any favors in the longterm by using language that minimizes the challenges to opening the parks, as he did in his statement.

                        (And BTW, in Iger's current position it's not for him to be making statements for the Company. That's the CEO's job. Iger sounding off about something this important could cause confusion on Wall Street, and raise questions about who's running the Company.)
                        Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 04-07-2020, 05:11 PM.
                        "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                        it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                        together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                        designed to appeal to everyone."

                        - Walt Disney

                        "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                        - Michael Eisner

                        "It's very symbiotic."
                        - Bob Chapek

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I hope they are smart and have the hypothetical sensors in enclosed booths, as the Sun/heat could mess up results.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JacksonP View Post

                            What you said was: "We've kissed all our other privacy rights away. I guess we can kiss our health privacy rights away too." There are no privacy rights at Disney because it is a private company
                            I still never said Disney could not implement such a system. Whether or not its a technically legally protected right because it's coming from a private entity, you would still be giving up your privacy. If a company such as Disney were to require you to undergo some kind of medical exam, no matter how minimal or minor, to gain entry, you would be giving up your privacy if you chose to enter. We can say the person consented and thus no rights were violated. But what if something like this were implemented on a wider scale? Before you could get on a plane, ride a bus, go to Disneyland, enter any public building, etc, you had to "waive" your privacy rights? That would be a real loss of privacy, because in order to function in society, one would have to "waive" or "consent" to the intrusion.

                            I admit taking a temperature is a minor intrusion. It's not even an effective preventable measure as Wiggins pointed out. But just change the scenario slightly and how many of you would say it wasn't an intrusion in your privacy. What if there was some other health threat and if you wanted to go somewhere, you had to disclose your recent sexual history? Would you say you have no privacy in your sex life? What if you were required to allow the non-governmental entity to track your every move? Would you be fine with that because its a private entity doing the monitoring and not the government? What if beyond a temperature scan, in order to purchase something or go somewhere, you had to tell them everyone you've contacted recently, undergo a blood test, download an app on your phone and allow the app access to internet search history or photos? The point is, once we as a community begin to give up our rights, even in small seemingly benign ways, it is impossible to get them back. Just look at what China is doing with things like social currency. Private entities are not allowed to discriminate on a whole host of things, such as race, color, etc. We don't like it when private insurance companies are allowed to discriminate based on health. Why would you be ok with Disneyland or any other private entity discriminating based on health? As I said in my original post, why would Disney even need to do any kind of health scan once this has passed or once a vaccine is available? What is the state of emergency at that point that necessitates the intrusion?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bye130 View Post

                              HIPAA applies to healthcare organizations, other businesses are not covered by it. The closest you could get is ADA violation if somehow you had a disability that triggered a rejection, but as some one who doesn't know every condition ever to exist don't know of conditions besides sicknesses that raise body temperature. If you are going to a checkpoint voluntarily you are already provided Disney with permission to check you.
                              I know this. What I am saying is that the right to (healthcare) privacy is not a constitutional right but there is a law - HIPAA - which makes a violation of those rights punishable by law. It’s ok for them to bar someone from getting in to Disneyland but they sure as heck better make sure it is done in such a way that the results of such a screening are kept hidden from the rest of the guests and non-essential cast members and that their identity remains protected from those around them.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

                                The medical experts have made it clear that having a normal temperature is not a valid test for the absence of COVID-19. A person can be infected and be spreading the virus for up to two weeks without showing any symptoms.

                                Legal issues about invasion of personal privacy wouldn't be Disney's concern. Instead, they'll want to protect themselves against lawsuits by people who claim to have caught COVID-19 on Disney property. That's why Disney's domestic parks, hotels and cruise ships won't open until Disney Legal signs off on it -- and Legal won't sign off until they've hired a legion of infectious disease experts to advise them on screening methods.

                                Well.exactly.
                                Don't we all wish it were as simple as taking a temperature.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  While, this is a good measure and better than nothing, it does not even come close to helping eliminate people being infected enter since scientists now speculate anywhere from 25% to as much as 50% of the population never shows signs or symptoms with COVID-19. A nice bonus to Covid screenings would also help keep keep people with the flu and other bugs out as well, which is always a good thing. Much like social distancing and people now taking washing hands more seriously and masks probably becoming the new normal here in the US, those habits will probably make the spread of the cold and the flu less common or potentially less common as long as those practices are still occurring.

                                  I am going to just guess that when things begin to reopen, you will see strict guidelines in place in terms of crowd control. Theme parks, sporting venues, movie theaters, concert venues, restaurants, jet planes, etc. will not be able to fill up to capacity any more or indefinitely until this dies down and a vaccine or something that makes it less of a threat or as serious of a health issue arrives. I am going to guess half as many people that were allowed to be in any given venue/park before will be allowed to be in these areas that have crowds after this. Movie theater chains were starting to enforce this in the week leading up to the shutdowns, so I really won't be shocked to see it being done at sporting events, concerts, festivals, theme parks, flights, etc. 9/11 changed a lot of things when it came to how we travel and ushered in a whole new set of rules and stricter guidelines and regulations. I suspect this is going to impact some things we were used to as well before all this happened when it comes to places that have tons of people being in one area or that have big crowds.
                                  Last edited by DarthBrett78; 04-07-2020, 04:14 PM.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Another consideration. What about vacationers or out of towners who booked a hotel and bought tickets months in advance. Then say they arrive at park, they have a temperature above whatever cutoff Disney elects. Disney then denies them admission to park and hotel. You think those people are going to get a refund? You think people would be happy? Disney isn’t going to want to have that PR nightmare either. You think it was bad PR for them to continue collecting payments on APs, wait until the news of people who saved a lifetime or traveled from afar only to be denied admission! Even worse if no refund!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by DarthBrett78 View Post
                                      While, this is a good measure and better than nothing, it does not even come close to helping eliminate people being infected enter since scientists now speculate anywhere from 25% to as much as 50% of the population never shows signs or symptoms with COVID-19. A nice bonus to Covid screenings would also help keep keep people with the flu and other bugs out as well, which is always a good thing. Much like social distancing and people now taking washing hands more seriously and masks probably becoming the new normal here in the US, those habits will probably make the spread of the cold and the flu less common or potentially less common as long as those practices are still occurring.

                                      I am going to just guess that when things begin to reopen, you will see strict guidelines in place in terms of crowd control. Theme parks, sporting venues, movie theaters, concert venues, restaurants, jet planes, etc. will not be able to fill up to capacity any more or indefinitely until this dies down and a vaccine or something that makes it less of a threat or as serious of a health issue arrives. I am going to guess half as many people that were allowed to be in any given venue/park before will be allowed to be in these areas that have crowds after this. Movie theater chains were starting to enforce this in the week leading up to the shutdowns, so I really won't be shocked to see it being done at sporting events, concerts, festivals, theme parks, flights, etc. 9/11 changed a lot of things when it came to how we travel and ushered in a whole new set of rules and stricter guidelines and regulations. I suspect this is going to impact some things we were used to as well before all this happened when it comes to places that have tons of people being in one area or that have big crowds.
                                      Spot on. Depending on the world-wide status of the pandemic when DLR and WDW reopen, Disney could be facing many challenges, as their resorts are international destinations. In addition to daily testing of all visitors and employees, will it need to mandate that everyone wear non-N95 masks to protect the rest of the crowd if the tests are not 100% foolproof? How would Disney enforce rules for social distancing, much less mask wearing, on rides and in restaurants and stores? For all the changes in normal park-going behavior that visitors will face, there may be enormously more for Disney management and CMs -- none of which promises to be helpful to Disney's bottom line.


                                      Originally posted by hbdad View Post
                                      Another consideration. What about vacationers or out of towners who booked a hotel and bought tickets months in advance. Then say they arrive at park, they have a temperature above whatever cutoff Disney elects. Disney then denies them admission to park and hotel. You think those people are going to get a refund? You think people would be happy? Disney isn’t going to want to have that PR nightmare either. You think it was bad PR for them to continue collecting payments on APs, wait until the news of people who saved a lifetime or traveled from afar only to be denied admission! Even worse if no refund!
                                      Bingo. And yet, no income + mass refunds = reeely bad bottom line. Management is facing some very tough decisions.
                                      Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 04-07-2020, 05:07 PM.
                                      "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                                      it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                                      together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                                      designed to appeal to everyone."

                                      - Walt Disney

                                      "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                                      - Michael Eisner

                                      "It's very symbiotic."
                                      - Bob Chapek

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by DisneyIPresume View Post

                                        I know this. What I am saying is that the right to (healthcare) privacy is not a constitutional right but there is a law - HIPAA - which makes a violation of those rights punishable by law. It’s ok for them to bar someone from getting in to Disneyland but they sure as heck better make sure it is done in such a way that the results of such a screening are kept hidden from the rest of the guests and non-essential cast members and that their identity remains protected from those around them.
                                        HIPAA ONLY applies to healthcare organizations. Medical information can be shared by any other organization and not be violating a law. Also HIPAA does NOT allow for private cause of action meaning you a person can not sue for a HIPAA violation, the federal government levies fines for those violations.

                                        Comment

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