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Disneyland Updated Policy on Multi-Day and Single Day Tickets

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  • Disneyland Updated Policy on Multi-Day and Single Day Tickets

    I did not notice anyone else post this here, but as of May 8th Disneyland posted their policy regarding customers who bought multi-day and single day tickets.

    https://disneyland.disney.go.com/en-...l-information/

    The take away, single day ticket users and multi day ticket users are kind of getting screwed if the current policy still stands. If you purchased a standard ticket this year and it expires Jan 2021, as of now you are NOT getting an extension on that expiry, which means people who booked hotels around and in the resort would need to travel between now and the end of the year to ensure their tickets are still valid.

    The only real two changes Disney made was extending used tickets beyond the 13 day expiry, if you used a portion of the ticket it will now expire December 15 2020 instead, and if you purchased a Canadian resident or Australian/New Zealand offer they expire May 31 2021.

    The sum result looks pretty cheesy on Disney's part. Sure you extended, but you also only extended to the edges of holiday breaks which is probably going to be an issue for a ton of families. In addition, you think that they would extend unused tickets to go beyond this coming end of year, even if only equal to the time of closure. When you have companies like Delta and Air Canada allowing customers to re-book up to TWO YEARS after their initial booking preventing a tickets use during the summer the year after is pretty deplorable looking.

    Seems super shortsighted too, since a lot of families will probably just cut their losses not use the tickets at all and go on a cheaper vacation or none at all if they are forced to travel during a time when they may not feel safe to do so.

  • #2
    I remember when the tickets were good forever.

    Then, when the Passport ticket came into being there was a big promotion to bring in your old ticket books - no matter how old - for a discount! I'll bet there are a lot of regrets, as they are valuable collectibles now.

    Hey -- what if they sold "Forever" tickets (like "Forever Stamps")? - That might cost a little more but never expired. In a few years guests who bought a bunch would be saving money. It would be a way to conjure up a bunch of cash upfront.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by merlinjones View Post
      I remember when the tickets were good forever.

      Then, when the Passport ticket came into being there was a big promotion to bring in your old ticket books - no matter how old - for a discount! I'll bet there are a lot of regrets, as they are valuable collectibles now.

      Hey -- what if they sold "Forever" tickets (like "Forever Stamps")? - That might cost a little more but never expired. In a few years guests who bought a bunch would be saving money. It would be a way to conjure up a bunch of cash upfront.
      While I think this is a great idea especially for the customer I don’t think it will happen. Disney just stands to lose to much money.

      1. People would buy tickets just to have them even if they didn’t plan on going for awhile. I know I would. Eventually the price I bought the never expire ticket at would be less than a regular ticket

      2. One of the reasons they got rid of the unlimited expiration was because they removed impulse trips from guests on a visit. If I’m with my family and we have five day tickets on a 7 day trip we might decide “you know what let’s go to Knotts one day and whenever we are in California again we’ll do Disney.” Not a big deal right? Family probably comes back and uses the day anyways no loss. But next time that family wants their Disney fix they may stay near the property for only two days because they have the leftover unused day and don’t want to buy more. They still come back, but that family is now eating and shopping in DLR for a day or two instead of coming back for five. It adds up when you add up all the families and times this happens

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      • #4
        All that has ever “expired” with a Disney ticket has been the access it grants. You still have the cash value of the ticket that would be good. And unless something has changed with their stance there, that is all this expiration means as well.

        I think they only recently (past few years) started making one day tickets admission expire. Hey used to just be valid forever.

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        • #5
          "Then you should say what you mean," the March Hare went on.

          "I do," Alice hastily replied; "at least—at least I mean what I say—that's the same thing, you know."

          "Not the same thing a bit!" said the Hatter. "Why, you might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"

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          • #6
            Its a bold move for Disney to piss off people who bought tickets...if they are smart they better treat everyone like a VIP until this is all over
            Happy Halloween!!!

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            • #7
              The unused tickets retain their cash value theoretically forever. What Disney is doing is making sure they make a buck or ten if, excuse me WHEN, ticket prices increase next year since the diff will come out of people's pockets. Based on that I'd say a price hike in 2021 is a cert. And probably a hefty one, at that. Next year is a WDW year for us, so I'm cringing at what our trip may cost compared to last year (2019).

              I feel sorry for those who had to shorten their stay. They have until the middle of December to 'recoup' their loss. That's just mean since we don't know when DL will reopen and many people simply don't have the ability and/or funds to travel at the drop of a hat.

              For some, it was that scrimp and save 'once in a lifetime' trip and they'd have to save a heck of a lot longer than the 6 remaining months the tickets are valid so they'll just lose the money. For others it means cramming in a hastily planned trip between whenever DL reopens and mid-December and hoping the crowds aren't hellacious or if they can get a reservation (if DL reopens that way). That 'window' could be as little as 30-60 days if the parks don't reopen until Fall.

              They should have offered pro-rated refunds based on the ticket price and the days left as well as offering an extended expiration date. At least they should have offered a refund for people who don't live within a reasonable 'day trip' distance, say, outside the So Cal AP zip codes.
              Last edited by Stormy; 05-17-2020, 07:59 AM.
              "Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.​"

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              • #8
                This is still up on the Disneyland website: they can’t have it both ways! Don’t tell guests the Deadline is Dec 2020 when their policy has aways been you can exchange your ticket for the eligible amount. It’s literally still on their page. Very frustrating as we have 20 passes to auction for a school fundraiser and they’re trying to tell us they won’t be eligible to exchange.
                1. Unless otherwise stated, the amount paid for any wholly unused, expired Disneyland® Resort theme park ticket, except for special event tickets and Annual Passports, may be applied towards the purchase of a new theme park admission ticket at the current price so long as the new ticket purchase price is equal to or greater than the amount paid for the original ticket. Please visit a Main Entrance ticket booth, a Disneyland® Resort hotel Front Desk or Concierge, or a Guest Relations location in a theme park to apply any eligible ticket amount towards a new ticket purchase. The amount paid for any theme park ticket may not be redeemed for cash or used for any other goods or services other than for another theme park admission ticket. No credit or refunds will be given for the non-use of any portion of a theme park admission ticket’s entitlements (e.g., using a 4-day ticket for 3 days of admission; using a Peak 1-Day ticket on a Value season date; not using Disney MaxPass on its validity day; etc.).

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