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  • [Other] Why are we so afraid of change?

    Since coming back here a few days ago, I have been rather sharply reminded that the Disney theme park fandom, by and large, hates change. Any announcement of a change, at any scale, to any attraction, in any park, is met with weeping and wailing fit for the end of days. I've been guilty of it myself.

    And it didn't used to be that way. Decades ago, people were always excited to hear that there was going to be something new at Disneyland, even if it meant something old was going away. So what happened? What, if you'll forgive the wordplay, was the change that made all other change unwelcome?

    I'm sure personal nostalgia plays a role, as those of us who are a bit older and have been going to Disneyland our whole lives have watched our childhood favorites be ousted for the sake of things that we just plain aren't interested in. But I think a larger issue is that we don't trust Disney anymore. Those aforementioned decades have seen a long string of bad decisions--decisions that were made in regard of the bottom line without regard for artistic integrity, and the parks have suffered as a result. The attention to theming and atmosphere that always made Disney parks a cut above everyone else has been steadily eroded. Where ideas used to be carefully cultivated and workshopped to make sure they would enhance the magic, now as often as not, the results detract from it instead.

    I've made no secret of my opinion that--to take the most high-profile current example--it's a good idea to turn Splash Mountain into something else, and hey, why not The Princess and the Frog? It's a cute movie with fun music and it fits in perfectly in that corner of Disneyland. But I'm still dreading it, because I know what happened the last time Disney turned a flume ride with a climactic drop into a Princess ride, and I would hate to see that happen to what is quite a well-crafted attraction, actually. As with the changes to PotC a couple years ago, I have to pit my commitment to social ethics against my commitment to artistry, and...I shouldn't have to. I should be able to trust that Imagineering will be given the leeway and budget to make something both beautiful and socially responsible, and I just don't have that confidence anymore.
    Like this post? Read more like it at The Disneyland Dilettante!

  • #2
    It’s pure Nostalgia. That’s where 80-90% of the hate from people will come from. To this day you still have people complaining about Winnie The Pooh taking over the Country Bear ride or how the Peoplemover tracks should’ve never had those dumb Rocket Rods put on them.
    Thing is it doesn’t come from a kid or teenager. It’s usually from someone who preferred that ride. (In the Peoplemover case though I feel that should’ve been kept up but I never had the chance to go to Disneyland before they were closed.)
    Point being it shouldn’t really be said that people are afraid of change but more that they just don’t want it to happen because their memories of what Disneyland were for them back in the day or their idea of a Classic is now being taken away for something else.

    Comment


    • #3
      I think it's too reductive to say that it's only nostalgia, which is why I mentioned nostalgia in the OP but then elaborated upon my other big reason.
      Like this post? Read more like it at The Disneyland Dilettante!

      Comment


      • #4
        I think you hit the nail on the head that trust is the biggest problem. Mr Wiggins and I had a spirited debate recently about this and how for many, the park hasn’t been the same since Eisner took over.

        The kind of change that has come in the years since have split the community, and those that don’t like much of what has happened in the last 35 years or so have lost faith that Disney will ever put something new in the park that appeals to their taste and idea of what the park is and means.

        Disneyland is such a personal experience for those of us that love the place. As such, it’s always great when change you agree with happens, but is hurtful when change you don’t agree with happens.
        Mike_M

        Disneyland Trips
        Walt Disney World
        Disneyland Paris

        1980, 1982, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1989
        1990, 1992, 1993

        2000, 2001, 2006, 2007, 2009
        2010, 2011, 2014, 2016, 2016, 2017, 2/2019, 11/2019
        2020

        Comment


        • #5
          Those of us who were adult Disneyland fans in the decades before Eisner always looked forward to Disneyland changing. We became used to Disneyland constantly changing for the better. Changes that gave us not only more than we expected, but more than we could imagine. The Viewliner became the Monorail. The Phantom Boats became the Submarine Voyage. Tomorrowland '55 became Tomorrowland '67. Fantasyland '55 became Fantasyland '83. Cam-and-lever figures became Audio Animatronics. The Tiki Room, Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln, Pirates of the Caribbean and Haunted Mansion were mindblowing in their day. Year after year, Disneyland was an ever-changing showcase of progress, a place of constant plussing. "Change for the better" was the standard that Disneyland held itself to. "Change for the better" was the standard that we expected as kids, teenagers and adults.

          In comparison, much of the change Disney has offered in the last two decades is change for the worse. Tomorrowland '67 became Tomorrowland '98. America Sings became Innoventions. Submarine Voyage thru Liquid Space became the Finding Nemo Underwater Kiddie Video. Swiss Family Treehouse became a Tarzan Disney Store display. Tahitian Terrace became Aladdin's Oasis, which became a ghost restaurant. PeopleMover became Rocket Rods, which became a ghost attraction. The Motorboat Cruise was replaced with... a smoking area. The Skyway was replaced with... nothing. Landmarks like Fort Wilderness and Cascade Peak were literally allowed to rot. Unique, land-specific merchandise was replaced by generic character crap in every store. Year after year -- until it became obvious that when Disney management made a change, the result would often be worse than what it replaced. Until it became clear that to today's Disney Corporation, "change" was an excuse for a decline-by-degrees in the overall standards of innovation and creativity in their domestic theme parks.
          "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
          it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
          together with every variety of recreation and fun,
          designed to appeal to everyone."

          - Walt Disney

          "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
          - Michael Eisner

          "It's very symbiotic."
          - Bob Chapek

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm quite a bit younger than you, Mr Wiggins, but I barely remember a few things from before Eisner. I have a slim memory of getting tuna fish sandwiches at the Captain Hook restaurant, and my favorite ride used to be Adventure Thru Inner Space. In some ways I fall right between the most vocal generations of Disneyland fans. Major changes to the park were scarcer during my early childhood than they were about 15-20 years prior, but I was already an adolescent for the Disney Renaissance that really changed the way the public viewed Disney products in general.

            And I think there are some aspects of the situation that are out of Disney's control and/or not to be lamented. OSHA regulations may make certain kinds of construction projects unfeasible, but we should be glad they're there. And the extent to which Disneyland is hemmed in by its own borders is a testament to its success. I just wish the decision-makers--and most of the ticket-buying public--weren't so convinced that every ride needs to be a movie tie-in. We might see some real creativity regarding content if theme park rides were viewed as works of media in their own right rather than merely spin-offs from other works.
            Like this post? Read more like it at The Disneyland Dilettante!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
              Those of us who were adult Disneyland fans in the decades before Eisner always looked forward to Disneyland changing. We became used to Disneyland constantly changing for the better. Changes that gave us not only more than we expected, but more than we could imagine. The Viewliner became the Monorail. The Phantom Boats became the Submarine Voyage. Tomorrowland '55 became Tomorrowland '67. Fantasyland '55 became Fantasyland '83. Cam-and-lever figures became Audio Animatronics. The Tiki Room, Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln, Pirates of the Caribbean and Haunted Mansion were mindblowing in their day. Year after year, Disneyland was an ever-changing showcase of progress, a place of constant plussing. "Change for the better" was the standard that Disneyland held itself to. "Change for the better" was the standard that we expected as kids, teenagers and adults.

              In comparison, much of the change Disney has offered in the last two decades is change for the worse. Tomorrowland '67 became Tomorrowland '98. America Sings became Innoventions. Submarine Voyage thru Liquid Space became the Finding Nemo Underwater Kiddie Video. Swiss Family Treehouse became a Tarzan Disney Store display. Tahitian Terrace became Aladdin's Oasis, which became a ghost restaurant. PeopleMover became Rocket Rods, which became a ghost attraction. The Motorboat Cruise was replaced with... a smoking area. The Skyway was replaced with... nothing. Landmarks like Fort Wilderness and Cascade Peak were literally allowed to rot. Unique, land-specific merchandise was replaced by generic character crap in every store. Year after year -- until it became obvious that when Disney management made a change, the result would often be worse than what it replaced. Until it became clear that to today's Disney Corporation, "change" was an excuse for a decline-by-degrees in the overall standards of innovation and creativity in their domestic theme parks.
              Grand slam.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
                today's Disney Corporation, "change" was an excuse for a decline-by-degrees in the overall standards of innovation and creativity in their domestic theme parks.
                I Agree

                Soaring like an EAGLE !

                Comment


                • #9
                  In 15 years on this forum, I haven't seen a more on-target post contrasting how Disney operated then and now, than this one:

                  Originally posted by stovk View Post
                  I believe that's how Imagineering used to work.

                  1. Think of the "Land" the Attraction will fit.
                  2. Think of likely themes that would fit in that "Land".
                  3. Brainstorm those ideas.
                  4. Sketch-up some concepts.
                  5. Get approval.
                  6. Build prototypes.
                  7. Get final sign off.
                  8. Construction starts.
                  9. Marketing under-promises.
                  10. Attraction opens and WDI over-delivers.
                  11. Guests are amazed.

                  Now it's:

                  1. Corporate wants to push IP "X"
                  2. Consumer Products/Merchandising starts working on products.
                  3. WDI is informed by Corporate their budget is "Y".
                  4. WDI is informed by Corporate what the theme will be.
                  5. Marketing starts promoting the "New Attraction"
                  6. WDI is informed what the Concept will be.
                  7. WDI is micro-managed by Corporate every step of the way.
                  8. Construction starts.
                  9. WDI is informed by Corporate that some attractions eliminated/changed.
                  10. Opening date is delayed.
                  11. Marketing goes into hyper-promotional phase.
                  12. Attraction opens to tepid reception.
                  13. Park is flooded with new Attraction merchandise.
                  14. Corporate blames WDI for Attraction not meeting expectations.

                  "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                  it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                  together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                  designed to appeal to everyone."

                  - Walt Disney

                  "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                  - Michael Eisner

                  "It's very symbiotic."
                  - Bob Chapek

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I agree wit the lack of trust, the second time I went to WDW we got into Alien Encounter and it was amazing , just to be replaced by Sitch Great Scape because Stich was popular they made a cheap makeover , since the original attraction wasn't meant for small kids, in the Stich version I noticed many small children were afraid when they turned off the lights
                    I also disliked the Nemo makeover for The Living Seas and many of the Epcot attractions
                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      As a Millennial, I didn't notice anything 'off' about Disneyland as a kid. Space Mountain got a paint job? Cool! The 2 Autopias being merged. Cool! And best of all, Disneyland was getting a 2nd park!!!Yay!

                      Yes, the signs were there. Rocket Rods was....ok. Hmm, the Subs just randomly closed. Wait, why isn't Superstar Limo listed as an attraction any more? I didn't even get to ride it? Why did they have to close the County Bear Jamboree?

                      Again, I was still a kid and I didn't understand how the parks ran as a business. And as time went on and I grew up, I understood the whats and whys better.

                      Why do I bring this up? Part of this conversation can be chalked up to 'beauty is in the eye of beholder'. There are things that I was surprised to hear Disney fans actually hated! They actually didn't like the Birthday cake theme Cinderella Castle? They didn't actually like the Sorcerer's hat in MGM? People preferred the white facade for It's a Small World over the pastel scheme?! [I'm still surprised by that one].

                      If you are significantly attached to something, then it can be painful to loose it or see it get altered. I remember being devastated by the remodeling of the Disneyland Hotel in 2010s. Gone were the memories there that I had as a kid. How dare they destroy my memories and joy, over something seemingly stupid!

                      Fastfoward a decade later, and I will admit some of my bitterness still remains (BRING BACK FANTASY WATERS!) but much of the frustration had gone away during my last Disneyland trip(some of it due to the pending shut down). I had realized that some of the changes they added, were actually...good, like the Tangorra Terrace, the Minnie Hot Tub and the Monorail slides. So maybe, I rushed to judgement.

                      But to answer the OP, aphrension to changes in the parks, can also be blamed on Disney's track record, which has been mixed at times. Like some of the above mentions...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I’m a millennial, and my first visit to Disneyland was sometime in the late 90s. Overtime I’ve become less concerned about change and more concerned regarding the upkeep of show elements. In fact, I welcome change because there’s always a sliver of hope that it will force Disney to better maintain their shows and attractions. My last visit in March before the lockdown, I honestly had the worst Disney day. Both yetis in the Matterhorn were completely broken and stationary, the boulder scene in Indiana Jones did not work, Splash Mountain was rotting away (B’rer Rabbit was actually missing in most of his scenes), and some show elements were missing in Pirates. Witnessing all these things in quick succession felt more painful than losing an attraction altogether.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
                          Those of us who were adult Disneyland fans in the decades before Eisner always looked forward to Disneyland changing. We became used to Disneyland constantly changing for the better. Changes that gave us not only more than we expected, but more than we could imagine. The Viewliner became the Monorail. The Phantom Boats became the Submarine Voyage. Tomorrowland '55 became Tomorrowland '67. Fantasyland '55 became Fantasyland '83. Cam-and-lever figures became Audio Animatronics. The Tiki Room, Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln, Pirates of the Caribbean and Haunted Mansion were mindblowing in their day. Year after year, Disneyland was an ever-changing showcase of progress, a place of constant plussing. "Change for the better" was the standard that Disneyland held itself to. "Change for the better" was the standard that we expected as kids, teenagers and adults.

                          In comparison, much of the change Disney has offered in the last two decades is change for the worse. Tomorrowland '67 became Tomorrowland '98. America Sings became Innoventions. Submarine Voyage thru Liquid Space became the Finding Nemo Underwater Kiddie Video. Swiss Family Treehouse became a Tarzan Disney Store display. Tahitian Terrace became Aladdin's Oasis, which became a ghost restaurant. PeopleMover became Rocket Rods, which became a ghost attraction. The Motorboat Cruise was replaced with... a smoking area. The Skyway was replaced with... nothing. Landmarks like Fort Wilderness and Cascade Peak were literally allowed to rot. Unique, land-specific merchandise was replaced by generic character crap in every store. Year after year -- until it became obvious that when Disney management made a change, the result would often be worse than what it replaced. Until it became clear that to today's Disney Corporation, "change" was an excuse for a decline-by-degrees in the overall standards of innovation and creativity in their domestic theme parks.
                          Couldn't have said it better.

                          I would like to add, to answer the OP's question. It's not "change" most [Disney fans] are afraid of. It's what will that "change" be? So far, most of the changes have been cringe worthy and below expectations and Disney's standards.

                          I've said it before in another post. It used to be, for me, when I heard there was going to be something new at Disneyland, I was excited for it. Now, every time I hear there's going to be a change at Disneyland I think to myself, "How are they going to screw this up?"

                          On a related note. If you want to see what has changed (some good, some not so good), this is probably the best documentary on Disneyland.

                          People and Places: Disneyland USA (1956)



                          "Here in Southern California, a new land has come into being. Its purpose is enlightenment. Its product, happiness. This place is Disneyland, U.S.A.. Disneyland could happen only in a country where freedom is a heritage and the pursuit of happiness a basic Human Right."

                          The truth is, nothing truer could be said.
                          Last edited by stovk; 07-05-2020, 11:37 AM.
                          “Not the least hard thing to bear when they go from us, these quiet friends, is that they carry away with them
                          so many years of our own lives.”


                          DL Trips: '58, '59, '61, '65, '66, '67, '68x2, '69x2, '70x2, '71x2, '73x2, '74x2, '75x2, '76x2, '77, '78,x2, '79x2, '80x2, '81, '82, '83, '88, '89x3, '90x2, '91, '93, '94, '95x2, '96, '97, '98x4, '99, '00, '01, '02, '03, '04, '05, '06, '07x2, '08, '09x2, '10, '11, '13
                          WDW Trips: '81
                          EPCOT Trips: '93
                          Tokyo DL Trips: '86

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
                            Those of us who were adult Disneyland fans in the decades before Eisner always looked forward to Disneyland changing. We became used to Disneyland constantly changing for the better. Changes that gave us not only more than we expected, but more than we could imagine. The Viewliner became the Monorail. The Phantom Boats became the Submarine Voyage. Tomorrowland '55 became Tomorrowland '67. Fantasyland '55 became Fantasyland '83. Cam-and-lever figures became Audio Animatronics. The Tiki Room, Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln, Pirates of the Caribbean and Haunted Mansion were mindblowing in their day. Year after year, Disneyland was an ever-changing showcase of progress, a place of constant plussing. "Change for the better" was the standard that Disneyland held itself to. "Change for the better" was the standard that we expected as kids, teenagers and adults.

                            In comparison, much of the change Disney has offered in the last two decades is change for the worse. Tomorrowland '67 became Tomorrowland '98. America Sings became Innoventions. Submarine Voyage thru Liquid Space became the Finding Nemo Underwater Kiddie Video. Swiss Family Treehouse became a Tarzan Disney Store display. Tahitian Terrace became Aladdin's Oasis, which became a ghost restaurant. PeopleMover became Rocket Rods, which became a ghost attraction. The Motorboat Cruise was replaced with... a smoking area. The Skyway was replaced with... nothing. Landmarks like Fort Wilderness and Cascade Peak were literally allowed to rot. Unique, land-specific merchandise was replaced by generic character crap in every store. Year after year -- until it became obvious that when Disney management made a change, the result would often be worse than what it replaced. Until it became clear that to today's Disney Corporation, "change" was an excuse for a decline-by-degrees in the overall standards of innovation and creativity in their domestic theme parks.


                            Mr Wiggins has knocked it out of the ballpark, run the bases, removed his cap and bowed to the crowd!!!!
                            "Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.​"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              yep -

                              Those of us who were adult Disneyland fans in the decades before Eisner always looked forward to Disneyland changing. We became used to Disneyland constantly changing for the better. Changes that gave us not only more than we expected, but more than we could imagine. The Viewliner became the Monorail. The Phantom Boats became the Submarine Voyage. Tomorrowland '55 became Tomorrowland '67. Fantasyland '55 became Fantasyland '83. Cam-and-lever figures became Audio Animatronics. The Tiki Room, Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln, Pirates of the Caribbean and Haunted Mansion were mindblowing in their day. Year after year, Disneyland was an ever-changing showcase of progress, a place of constant plussing. "Change for the better" was the standard that Disneyland held itself to. "Change for the better" was the standard that we expected as kids, teenagers and adults.

                              In comparison, much of the change Disney has offered in the last two decades is change for the worse. Tomorrowland '67 became Tomorrowland '98. America Sings became Innoventions. Submarine Voyage thru Liquid Space became the Finding Nemo Underwater Kiddie Video. Swiss Family Treehouse became a Tarzan Disney Store display. Tahitian Terrace became Aladdin's Oasis, which became a ghost restaurant. PeopleMover became Rocket Rods, which became a ghost attraction. The Motorboat Cruise was replaced with... a smoking area. The Skyway was replaced with... nothing. Landmarks like Fort Wilderness and Cascade Peak were literally allowed to rot. Unique, land-specific merchandise was replaced by generic character crap in every store. Year after year -- until it became obvious that when Disney management made a change, the result would often be worse than what it replaced. Until it became clear that to today's Disney Corporation, "change" was an excuse for a decline-by-degrees in the overall standards of innovation and creativity in their domestic theme parks.
                              +

                              Overtime I’ve become less concerned about change and more concerned regarding the upkeep of show elements. In fact, I welcome change because there’s always a sliver of hope that it will force Disney to better maintain their shows and attractions. My last visit in March before the lockdown, I honestly had the worst Disney day. Both yetis in the Matterhorn were completely broken and stationary, the boulder scene in Indiana Jones did not work, Splash Mountain was rotting away (B’rer Rabbit was actually missing in most of his scenes), and some show elements were missing in Pirates. Witnessing all these things in quick succession felt more painful than losing an attraction altogether.
                              = The Truth

                              My thoughts,

                              DisCo coasted into hoping people would NOT remember how awesome Disneyland used to be...those “standards” slipped on a cheap banana peel long ago (Gummi Glen anyone?) It’s a nostalgia haze now, really of how it used to be for those of us lucky enough to personally recall the special feelings in the air there at so many times of day and year, that kinda got lost under a oily corporate sheen quite a while back, which is all that younger people will ever know. It’s a little like that now too, but fuzzier as Disneyland continually eliminated details and various textures of experience and became a “Resort”.

                              At first, it was this insulting proposition that in order to add something new, something old must go away; This is accountant thinking. Obviously there IS space to fit more into the park...how it all fits together is one of the most charming aspects of the place. There was always more room to cleverly move around the backstage, as the wizards at WED have proven many times over. They just chose not to...since you will be paying the same rate anyway after eliminating ticket books.

                              Like the lame excuse that they can't keep up with a Tomorrowland theme. Of course they can, its not that hard to stylize a sleek look, and just pay for a few Interesting exhibits instead of waiting for ‘sponsors‘ to cover costs..Hello DisCo? ‘ I ‘ am sponsoring the show...with my cash at the door, so deliver a show...go ahead and slap a name on it, but build it and run it right; please ‘produce’ a real show. Long lines are NOT compelling, so staff the place properly and open things at opening time, until closing time - oh the frustrating games they play with our time and money, and patience.

                              Consider this dismaying observation...that there were no MAJOR additions to Disneyland itself (no, DCA doesn’t count, it’s not in the same league) since IndyJones debuted in 1995...mostly reworking existing stuff and promotions after that - for more than 20 years, roughly a third of it’s 65 year existence! Talk about resting on your laurel leaves!! Incredible new attractions used to come to the park nearly every year or two, and they were generally amazing even when subtle.

                              Yet they insisted on lagging behind... In all that time, think of all the DISNEY properties that could have made amazing attractions of many sizes and shapes. Instead, they waited until the Company became deeply diluted into other brands to finally invested in producing attractions again...under those other names. The Disney Company didn’t seem to believe in “Walt Disney” enough to invest in that brand anymore for rides; waiting until Princesses paid off big in the stores, then StarWars and Marvel eventually got that funding instead of say Aladdin, or Beauty&Beast, or a good Mermaid ride.

                              Disneyland itself was exploited to the nth degree, and not nourished very well, but buried under so much unworthy silliness - while also becoming obscenely overpriced - or even really maintaining it’s former glories - that no amount of over-saturated colors can replace now. Momento mori.

                              ...Seriously, the best part of Disneyland is in my mind and heart. My interest and memories surpass the place for me anymore (And maybe for the world - now that sticky places are sicky and crowds shouldn’t clog every inch ever again). That could be the key to change in this new era!! Disney is going to need to evolve, quickly, into something more virtual somekindahow in a big way. Disney+ is a very fortunate good start. The doorway is through our nostalgia, and nobody knows how to play with that better than Disney. Real change it seems is upon us right now...shining at the end of every day.




                              Last edited by waltopia; 07-05-2020, 04:10 PM.
                              sigpic


                              "Disneyland is a work of love. We didn't go into Disneyland just with the idea of making money."
                              - - Walt Disney

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Change is always about the unknown and therefore of the fear that we’re not in control...Mr. Wiggins is so correct of a before time period and an after time period...good change enhances what has been in the parks and gets people excited to experience the new attraction...and that’s what happened in the before period...the after period was mainly a profiteering period benefiting mainly Disney executives...there were some bright moments in the after period: Soarin’ Over California, the 50th Anniversary with Matt Ouimet leading the way, the redoing of DCA and building of Carsland with John Lassiter as creative head, and the Rivers of America redesign which I felt enhanced the attraction...so the after period was change for the profit, not a change for the good...I an old man and I still love Disneyland...I love riding on trains, taking daughter on Matterhorn, eating hamburgers and fries like I did as a boy, love Mermaids and Cars...Disney ought to make changes, but only when they know it will make the guests experiences better than before, and when they are certain what they have planned will be the best efforts from everyone involved...
                                I am old. But still love Disneyland.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  It’s important to keep in mind ....

                                  once upon a time, Change didn’t involve “Offended” groups, marketers, and bean counters.

                                  Once upon a time Change was motivated by first generation imagineers, and a family run business... who were looking to improve, with the best intentions of HIGH quality.

                                  No one should be surprised by all the criticism Change gets these days. We often get a compromised project. Look at SW:GE! This is also why I don’t want the company to touch Tomorrowland. With the current mindset.... they will screw it up! GUARANTEED!!!
                                  MY SIGNATURE:
                                  Dear Peoplemover Fans, If you want to see a new attraction that at least mimics the 1967 Peoplemover in a future Tomorrowland remodel, you need to write to the powers-that-be, and let them know. If you don't - Then the next time Tomorrowland is remodeled, you will see a land barren of any "Peoplemover" type attraction.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    It seems that in the earlier years, change was aimed mostly at enhancing the guests overall experience.

                                    In the last couple of decades, change seems to be aimed primarily at increasing corporate profit.

                                    The main reason I'm opposed to most changes is because the profit (and ever-increasing executive bonuses) motive seems to getting worse thus resulting in a worsening guest experience.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
                                      Those of us who were adult Disneyland fans in the decades before Eisner always looked forward to Disneyland changing. We became used to Disneyland constantly changing for the better. Changes that gave us not only more than we expected, but more than we could imagine. The Viewliner became the Monorail. The Phantom Boats became the Submarine Voyage. Tomorrowland '55 became Tomorrowland '67. Fantasyland '55 became Fantasyland '83. Cam-and-lever figures became Audio Animatronics. The Tiki Room, Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln, Pirates of the Caribbean and Haunted Mansion were mindblowing in their day. Year after year, Disneyland was an ever-changing showcase of progress, a place of constant plussing. "Change for the better" was the standard that Disneyland held itself to. "Change for the better" was the standard that we expected as kids, teenagers and adults.

                                      In comparison, much of the change Disney has offered in the last two decades is change for the worse. Tomorrowland '67 became Tomorrowland '98. America Sings became Innoventions. Submarine Voyage thru Liquid Space became the Finding Nemo Underwater Kiddie Video. Swiss Family Treehouse became a Tarzan Disney Store display. Tahitian Terrace became Aladdin's Oasis, which became a ghost restaurant. PeopleMover became Rocket Rods, which became a ghost attraction. The Motorboat Cruise was replaced with... a smoking area. The Skyway was replaced with... nothing. Landmarks like Fort Wilderness and Cascade Peak were literally allowed to rot. Unique, land-specific merchandise was replaced by generic character crap in every store. Year after year -- until it became obvious that when Disney management made a change, the result would often be worse than what it replaced. Until it became clear that to today's Disney Corporation, "change" was an excuse for a decline-by-degrees in the overall standards of innovation and creativity in their domestic theme parks.
                                      WOW!!!

                                      This is the most well-written and accurate post I've ever read!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
                                        Those of us who were adult Disneyland fans in the decades before Eisner always looked forward to Disneyland changing. We became used to Disneyland constantly changing for the better. Changes that gave us not only more than we expected, but more than we could imagine. The Viewliner became the Monorail. The Phantom Boats became the Submarine Voyage. Tomorrowland '55 became Tomorrowland '67. Fantasyland '55 became Fantasyland '83. Cam-and-lever figures became Audio Animatronics. The Tiki Room, Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln, Pirates of the Caribbean and Haunted Mansion were mindblowing in their day. Year after year, Disneyland was an ever-changing showcase of progress, a place of constant plussing. "Change for the better" was the standard that Disneyland held itself to. "Change for the better" was the standard that we expected as kids, teenagers and adults.

                                        In comparison, much of the change Disney has offered in the last two decades is change for the worse. Tomorrowland '67 became Tomorrowland '98. America Sings became Innoventions. Submarine Voyage thru Liquid Space became the Finding Nemo Underwater Kiddie Video. Swiss Family Treehouse became a Tarzan Disney Store display. Tahitian Terrace became Aladdin's Oasis, which became a ghost restaurant. PeopleMover became Rocket Rods, which became a ghost attraction. The Motorboat Cruise was replaced with... a smoking area. The Skyway was replaced with... nothing. Landmarks like Fort Wilderness and Cascade Peak were literally allowed to rot. Unique, land-specific merchandise was replaced by generic character crap in every store. Year after year -- until it became obvious that when Disney management made a change, the result would often be worse than what it replaced. Until it became clear that to today's Disney Corporation, "change" was an excuse for a decline-by-degrees in the overall standards of innovation and creativity in their domestic theme parks.
                                        Yep........it the Leadership that change Disney
                                        and Today Disney took the path of decline-by-degrees IMO
                                        I also miss the charm of Fort Wilderness and Cascade Peak !
                                        Soaring like an EAGLE !

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