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  • #41
    Originally posted by Co Foo View Post
    I would love to see a sequel to the Sword in the Stone that covered adult King Arthur. The Arthur legend is probably my favorite piece of fantasy mythology and recent adaptations are generally too gritty for my taste. I'm not looking for a Game of Thrones-like version. This is definitely an example of where just the right amount of Disney touch could make something really special.
    This would really be fabulous. I read the four-book Merlin series by Mary Stewart twice in my younger years, and have been pondering reading the whole thing over again here in the year of Covid. Disney could do great things with the rich material from the King Arthur legend.

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    • #42
      Co Foo Pips

      My sister drew this.

      Her goal was to draw a Disney-style King Arthur in a way that made it absolutely clear he was Wart grown up.
      Attached Files
      Like this post? Read more like it at The Disneyland Dilettante!

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      • #43
        If they could work a ride system to do it, a combination thrill dark ride/thrill ride based on the Cave of Wonders in Aladdin. I guess in design it would be somewhat similar to Indiana Jones, but a suspended roller coaster that takes you through different show scenes,then suddenly launches when you need to escape, giving the sensation of flying to escape the cave starting to collapse and trap you.
        "Have I gone mad?"
        "I'm afraid so. You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret. All the best people are. "

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        • #44
          A proper Gummi Bears attraction. Preferably with the coaster sleds (for the life of me I cannot remember what those were called). In a dark ride style, with plenty of trap doors and the main characters of the show in AA form, and there better not be a single plywood cut out!!
          As part of a Public Service Announcement...
          Guardians Of The Galaxy
          Mission: Breakout
          ...is abbreviated like this
          GOTG M:B
          The colon is placed after the "M", not before it.
          That is all. 😉

          Comment


          • #45
            Originally posted by DisneySpaceAce View Post
            If they could work a ride system to do it, a combination thrill dark ride/thrill ride based on the Cave of Wonders in Aladdin. I guess in design it would be somewhat similar to Indiana Jones, but a suspended roller coaster that takes you through different show scenes,then suddenly launches when you need to escape, giving the sensation of flying to escape the cave starting to collapse and trap you.
            This would be so fun!!!

            Comment


            • #46
              Originally posted by bayouguy View Post
              I’ve always liked Treasure Planet, but I don’t have a ride idea handy. Maybe it could be tucked into Galaxy’s Edge as some distant outpost. Or as a dark ride concept in the carousel building in Tomorrowland.
              I loved Treasure Planet...Given a choice something in Tomorrowland, Your suggestion of the carousel building might not be far off the mark
              you don't have to be crazy to use this profile..but it helps

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              • #47
                Originally posted by Jesser-pie View Post
                This idea was from another MiceChatter long ago, but a Sleepy Hollow ride. It’s been years and it has not left my mind because it is simple yet so good.
                Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
                YES! The chase through Sleepy Hollow is a brilliant sequence of classic Disney animation. It would be a great foundation for a state-of-the-art dark ride. (It's a safe bet that it has been pitched more than once in the WED and WDI years.)
                Don't know if Sleepy Hollow was ever pitched as a standalone dark ride, but it was part of Ken Anderson's early development of the Haunted Mansion. His version of the HM was called Bloodmere Manor. Quoting from Jeff Baham's The Unauthorized Story of Walt Disney's Haunted Mansion:

                "Bloodmere Manor also featured a salon facing a large picture window, and in this room guests were to encounter a certain famous headless specter made popular in Walt Disney’s 1949 film The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad. In this concept, the attraction would have featured Ichabod Crane’s fateful encounter with the Headless Horseman, a show-stopping set piece filled with special effects. In a 1949 review of the film, Time Magazine stated that 'the midnight chase through a clutching, echoing forest, with the gangling, lily-livered schoolmaster in full flight before the Headless Horseman, is a skillful blend of the hilarious and the horrible. It is Disney at his facile best.' Undoubtedly, Anderson considered this highly effective scene a strong candidate as the basis for a visceral theme to which the audience could relate.

                In October 1957, Anderson wrote a treatment for this storyline describing those effects surrounding the climax of the attraction—which would have been a close encounter with the Horseman, of course—and describing how those effects were to be accomplished. Interestingly, many of the Haunted Mansion’s special effects utilized in the graveyard remain the same as Anderson envisioned them to this very day. Anderson, along with other experts from the Disney Studios and WED, had developed a number of intriguing practical effects that would make the Horseman’s arrival unforgettable.

                Due to the detail of Anderson’s test instructions that were developed for this scene, it’s likely that he, with the assistance of [Bob] Mattey, constructed the set at the Disney Studios on a sound stage as a demonstration for Walt Disney. The entire set would be backed by a cyclorama—a concave curtain backdrop—upon which clouds could be projected, simulating a stormy night. A moon projected onto the night sky would also be reflected in the waters of a simulated bayou, created by projecting the 'reflection' into an actual pan of water. A lightning flash and projected bolt would complete the stormy backdrop. Another effect proposed by Anderson, and used in the Haunted Mansion today, was a magic lantern-type effect, which entailed the projection of moving ghosts onto semi-transparent scrims hanging in front of the cyclorama, giving the scene some depth. Electric fans placed out of view would simulate the wind blowing prop branches and moss in the trees, and also give the water pans the necessary ripple.

                Anderson was extremely careful with the lighting of the scene. After describing the broken plaster and deconstructed nature of the salon room, Anderson found ways to light the room via muted, colored fluorescent light overhead, wall sconces, and subtle spotlights. The background music was to be dramatic as well—in Anderson’s view, the sprightly march from Disney’s
                The Skeleton Dance Silly Symphony cartoon (1929) would fit the bill perfectly, along with assorted stormy night, howling wolf, and galloping horse audio loops.

                Finally, the Headless Horseman arrives, first as an animated figure projected against a scrim off in the distance, then seeming to rapidly approach the salon via clever sound effects, and finally bursting into the scene behind the trees and shrubs in the foreground, his cape billowing in the wind as he storms off the set. A wolf’s howl sends skeletal ghosts flying out of their graves into the night sky, and a brilliant flash of lightning and a booming thunder clap bring the entire scene to a dramatic conclusion."
                "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                designed to appeal to everyone."

                - Walt Disney

                "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                - Michael Eisner

                "It's very symbiotic."
                - Bob Chapek

                Comment


                • #48
                  Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

                  Don't know if Sleepy Hollow was ever pitched as a standalone dark ride, but it was part of Ken Anderson's early development of the Haunted Mansion. His version of the HM was called Bloodmere Manor. Quoting from Jeff Baham's The Unauthorized Story of Walt Disney's Haunted Mansion:

                  "Bloodmere Manor also featured a salon facing a large picture window, and in this room guests were to encounter a certain famous headless specter made popular in Walt Disney’s 1949 film The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad. In this concept, the attraction would have featured Ichabod Crane’s fateful encounter with the Headless Horseman, a show-stopping set piece filled with special effects. In a 1949 review of the film, Time Magazine stated that 'the midnight chase through a clutching, echoing forest, with the gangling, lily-livered schoolmaster in full flight before the Headless Horseman, is a skillful blend of the hilarious and the horrible. It is Disney at his facile best.' Undoubtedly, Anderson considered this highly effective scene a strong candidate as the basis for a visceral theme to which the audience could relate.

                  In October 1957, Anderson wrote a treatment for this storyline describing those effects surrounding the climax of the attraction—which would have been a close encounter with the Horseman, of course—and describing how those effects were to be accomplished. Interestingly, many of the Haunted Mansion’s special effects utilized in the graveyard remain the same as Anderson envisioned them to this very day. Anderson, along with other experts from the Disney Studios and WED, had developed a number of intriguing practical effects that would make the Horseman’s arrival unforgettable.

                  Due to the detail of Anderson’s test instructions that were developed for this scene, it’s likely that he, with the assistance of [Bob] Mattey, constructed the set at the Disney Studios on a sound stage as a demonstration for Walt Disney. The entire set would be backed by a cyclorama—a concave curtain backdrop—upon which clouds could be projected, simulating a stormy night. A moon projected onto the night sky would also be reflected in the waters of a simulated bayou, created by projecting the 'reflection' into an actual pan of water. A lightning flash and projected bolt would complete the stormy backdrop. Another effect proposed by Anderson, and used in the Haunted Mansion today, was a magic lantern-type effect, which entailed the projection of moving ghosts onto semi-transparent scrims hanging in front of the cyclorama, giving the scene some depth. Electric fans placed out of view would simulate the wind blowing prop branches and moss in the trees, and also give the water pans the necessary ripple.

                  Anderson was extremely careful with the lighting of the scene. After describing the broken plaster and deconstructed nature of the salon room, Anderson found ways to light the room via muted, colored fluorescent light overhead, wall sconces, and subtle spotlights. The background music was to be dramatic as well—in Anderson’s view, the sprightly march from Disney’s
                  The Skeleton Dance Silly Symphony cartoon (1929) would fit the bill perfectly, along with assorted stormy night, howling wolf, and galloping horse audio loops.

                  Finally, the Headless Horseman arrives, first as an animated figure projected against a scrim off in the distance, then seeming to rapidly approach the salon via clever sound effects, and finally bursting into the scene behind the trees and shrubs in the foreground, his cape billowing in the wind as he storms off the set. A wolf’s howl sends skeletal ghosts flying out of their graves into the night sky, and a brilliant flash of lightning and a booming thunder clap bring the entire scene to a dramatic conclusion."
                  Thanks for this! It sounds wonderful.
                  Your false dichotomy bores me.

                  Comment

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