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  • MrGoat
    replied
    I don't know why it took so long for this to occur to me, but what about a Fantasia ride? One possibility: a water-based dark ride that takes you through scenes from the two movies. Could be like IASW, or Pirates, with drops and lifts. Another possibility: an indoor coaster/dark ride, maybe like RSR or Indy but more compact. Another possibility: a film like Philharmagic, complete with water effects, and maybe semi-mobile seats. Another: something like Star Tours.

    No Idea where I'd put it, though. Maybe Hollywood?

    Leave a comment:


  • Jesser-pie
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

    Don't know if Sleepy Hollow was ever pitched as a standalone dark ride, but it was part of Ken Anderson's early development of the Haunted Mansion. His version of the HM was called Bloodmere Manor. Quoting from Jeff Baham's The Unauthorized Story of Walt Disney's Haunted Mansion:

    "Bloodmere Manor also featured a salon facing a large picture window, and in this room guests were to encounter a certain famous headless specter made popular in Walt Disney’s 1949 film The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad. In this concept, the attraction would have featured Ichabod Crane’s fateful encounter with the Headless Horseman, a show-stopping set piece filled with special effects. In a 1949 review of the film, Time Magazine stated that 'the midnight chase through a clutching, echoing forest, with the gangling, lily-livered schoolmaster in full flight before the Headless Horseman, is a skillful blend of the hilarious and the horrible. It is Disney at his facile best.' Undoubtedly, Anderson considered this highly effective scene a strong candidate as the basis for a visceral theme to which the audience could relate.

    In October 1957, Anderson wrote a treatment for this storyline describing those effects surrounding the climax of the attraction—which would have been a close encounter with the Horseman, of course—and describing how those effects were to be accomplished. Interestingly, many of the Haunted Mansion’s special effects utilized in the graveyard remain the same as Anderson envisioned them to this very day. Anderson, along with other experts from the Disney Studios and WED, had developed a number of intriguing practical effects that would make the Horseman’s arrival unforgettable.

    Due to the detail of Anderson’s test instructions that were developed for this scene, it’s likely that he, with the assistance of [Bob] Mattey, constructed the set at the Disney Studios on a sound stage as a demonstration for Walt Disney. The entire set would be backed by a cyclorama—a concave curtain backdrop—upon which clouds could be projected, simulating a stormy night. A moon projected onto the night sky would also be reflected in the waters of a simulated bayou, created by projecting the 'reflection' into an actual pan of water. A lightning flash and projected bolt would complete the stormy backdrop. Another effect proposed by Anderson, and used in the Haunted Mansion today, was a magic lantern-type effect, which entailed the projection of moving ghosts onto semi-transparent scrims hanging in front of the cyclorama, giving the scene some depth. Electric fans placed out of view would simulate the wind blowing prop branches and moss in the trees, and also give the water pans the necessary ripple.

    Anderson was extremely careful with the lighting of the scene. After describing the broken plaster and deconstructed nature of the salon room, Anderson found ways to light the room via muted, colored fluorescent light overhead, wall sconces, and subtle spotlights. The background music was to be dramatic as well—in Anderson’s view, the sprightly march from Disney’s
    The Skeleton Dance Silly Symphony cartoon (1929) would fit the bill perfectly, along with assorted stormy night, howling wolf, and galloping horse audio loops.

    Finally, the Headless Horseman arrives, first as an animated figure projected against a scrim off in the distance, then seeming to rapidly approach the salon via clever sound effects, and finally bursting into the scene behind the trees and shrubs in the foreground, his cape billowing in the wind as he storms off the set. A wolf’s howl sends skeletal ghosts flying out of their graves into the night sky, and a brilliant flash of lightning and a booming thunder clap bring the entire scene to a dramatic conclusion."
    Thanks for this! It sounds wonderful.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by Jesser-pie View Post
    This idea was from another MiceChatter long ago, but a Sleepy Hollow ride. It’s been years and it has not left my mind because it is simple yet so good.
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
    YES! The chase through Sleepy Hollow is a brilliant sequence of classic Disney animation. It would be a great foundation for a state-of-the-art dark ride. (It's a safe bet that it has been pitched more than once in the WED and WDI years.)
    Don't know if Sleepy Hollow was ever pitched as a standalone dark ride, but it was part of Ken Anderson's early development of the Haunted Mansion. His version of the HM was called Bloodmere Manor. Quoting from Jeff Baham's The Unauthorized Story of Walt Disney's Haunted Mansion:

    "Bloodmere Manor also featured a salon facing a large picture window, and in this room guests were to encounter a certain famous headless specter made popular in Walt Disney’s 1949 film The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad. In this concept, the attraction would have featured Ichabod Crane’s fateful encounter with the Headless Horseman, a show-stopping set piece filled with special effects. In a 1949 review of the film, Time Magazine stated that 'the midnight chase through a clutching, echoing forest, with the gangling, lily-livered schoolmaster in full flight before the Headless Horseman, is a skillful blend of the hilarious and the horrible. It is Disney at his facile best.' Undoubtedly, Anderson considered this highly effective scene a strong candidate as the basis for a visceral theme to which the audience could relate.

    In October 1957, Anderson wrote a treatment for this storyline describing those effects surrounding the climax of the attraction—which would have been a close encounter with the Horseman, of course—and describing how those effects were to be accomplished. Interestingly, many of the Haunted Mansion’s special effects utilized in the graveyard remain the same as Anderson envisioned them to this very day. Anderson, along with other experts from the Disney Studios and WED, had developed a number of intriguing practical effects that would make the Horseman’s arrival unforgettable.

    Due to the detail of Anderson’s test instructions that were developed for this scene, it’s likely that he, with the assistance of [Bob] Mattey, constructed the set at the Disney Studios on a sound stage as a demonstration for Walt Disney. The entire set would be backed by a cyclorama—a concave curtain backdrop—upon which clouds could be projected, simulating a stormy night. A moon projected onto the night sky would also be reflected in the waters of a simulated bayou, created by projecting the 'reflection' into an actual pan of water. A lightning flash and projected bolt would complete the stormy backdrop. Another effect proposed by Anderson, and used in the Haunted Mansion today, was a magic lantern-type effect, which entailed the projection of moving ghosts onto semi-transparent scrims hanging in front of the cyclorama, giving the scene some depth. Electric fans placed out of view would simulate the wind blowing prop branches and moss in the trees, and also give the water pans the necessary ripple.

    Anderson was extremely careful with the lighting of the scene. After describing the broken plaster and deconstructed nature of the salon room, Anderson found ways to light the room via muted, colored fluorescent light overhead, wall sconces, and subtle spotlights. The background music was to be dramatic as well—in Anderson’s view, the sprightly march from Disney’s
    The Skeleton Dance Silly Symphony cartoon (1929) would fit the bill perfectly, along with assorted stormy night, howling wolf, and galloping horse audio loops.

    Finally, the Headless Horseman arrives, first as an animated figure projected against a scrim off in the distance, then seeming to rapidly approach the salon via clever sound effects, and finally bursting into the scene behind the trees and shrubs in the foreground, his cape billowing in the wind as he storms off the set. A wolf’s howl sends skeletal ghosts flying out of their graves into the night sky, and a brilliant flash of lightning and a booming thunder clap bring the entire scene to a dramatic conclusion."

    Leave a comment:


  • jedi Stitch
    replied
    Originally posted by bayouguy View Post
    I’ve always liked Treasure Planet, but I don’t have a ride idea handy. Maybe it could be tucked into Galaxy’s Edge as some distant outpost. Or as a dark ride concept in the carousel building in Tomorrowland.
    I loved Treasure Planet...Given a choice something in Tomorrowland, Your suggestion of the carousel building might not be far off the mark

    Leave a comment:


  • YellowTugStrap
    replied
    Originally posted by DisneySpaceAce View Post
    If they could work a ride system to do it, a combination thrill dark ride/thrill ride based on the Cave of Wonders in Aladdin. I guess in design it would be somewhat similar to Indiana Jones, but a suspended roller coaster that takes you through different show scenes,then suddenly launches when you need to escape, giving the sensation of flying to escape the cave starting to collapse and trap you.
    This would be so fun!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • JayRomy
    replied
    A proper Gummi Bears attraction. Preferably with the coaster sleds (for the life of me I cannot remember what those were called). In a dark ride style, with plenty of trap doors and the main characters of the show in AA form, and there better not be a single plywood cut out!!

    Leave a comment:


  • DisneySpaceAce
    replied
    If they could work a ride system to do it, a combination thrill dark ride/thrill ride based on the Cave of Wonders in Aladdin. I guess in design it would be somewhat similar to Indiana Jones, but a suspended roller coaster that takes you through different show scenes,then suddenly launches when you need to escape, giving the sensation of flying to escape the cave starting to collapse and trap you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Karalora
    replied
    Co Foo Pips

    My sister drew this.

    Her goal was to draw a Disney-style King Arthur in a way that made it absolutely clear he was Wart grown up.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Pips
    replied
    Originally posted by Co Foo View Post
    I would love to see a sequel to the Sword in the Stone that covered adult King Arthur. The Arthur legend is probably my favorite piece of fantasy mythology and recent adaptations are generally too gritty for my taste. I'm not looking for a Game of Thrones-like version. This is definitely an example of where just the right amount of Disney touch could make something really special.
    This would really be fabulous. I read the four-book Merlin series by Mary Stewart twice in my younger years, and have been pondering reading the whole thing over again here in the year of Covid. Disney could do great things with the rich material from the King Arthur legend.

    Leave a comment:


  • Co Foo
    replied
    I would love to see a sequel to the Sword in the Stone that covered adult King Arthur. The Arthur legend is probably my favorite piece of fantasy mythology and recent adaptations are generally too gritty for my taste. I'm not looking for a Game of Thrones-like version. This is definitely an example of where just the right amount of Disney touch could make something really special.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagleman
    replied
    Originally posted by Grand Gibson View Post
    I'd like them to start mashing up IPs and making attractions that do this well. For example, an attraction that combines the animals from Robin Hood, Jungle Book and Lion King. Create a brand new story that pits the heroes against the villains. This has already been done for shows (Fantasmic! is probably the best example of this), but I think it could also work for a dark ride.
    I thought
    I was only one Enjoy Robin Hood...which was done 1973
    and was same year, that Walt Disney Company turn 50......
    By looking at the other post's
    There was many other's did too !

    Leave a comment:


  • Grand Gibson
    replied
    I'd like them to start mashing up IPs and making attractions that do this well. For example, an attraction that combines the animals from Robin Hood, Jungle Book and Lion King. Create a brand new story that pits the heroes against the villains. This has already been done for shows (Fantasmic! is probably the best example of this), but I think it could also work for a dark ride.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by Sun Bonnet View Post
    So true. I think you talked about the Little Mermaid ride in another thread? I loved the movie. I must have watched it every day for close to a year after getting the VHS tape. But the ride... the best part is going underwater. I don't want to see Ariel in every room. I grew up on the Snow White ride and am used to being in the lead character's footsteps.It would be so much more fun to experience Flotsam and Jetsum upsetting our boat along the river than watching the kiss scene.
    Bingo. Sadly, that problem was designed into the ride. Concerns about it being one straight-from-the-movie-Ariel-scene after another were posted on MiceChat when the concept art was released. The lack of audience involvement was obvious from the artwork, and confirmed when the ride opened.

    Leave a comment:


  • Karalora
    replied
    Originally posted by Sun Bonnet View Post

    So true. I think you talked about the Little Mermaid ride in another thread? I loved the movie. I must have watched it every day for close to a year after getting the VHS tape. But the ride... the best part is going underwater. I don't want to see Ariel in every room. I grew up on the Snow White ride and am used to being in the lead character's footsteps.It would be so much more fun to experience Flotsam and Jetsum upsetting our boat along the river than watching the kiss scene.
    Oh yeah...the focus on "Look! It's Ariel!" isn't the only thing wrong with that ride, but it's a big one. You never really get a chance to settle into the scenes because it's always yanking your attention to what the cute redhead is doing. I don't know that you could do Mermaid as a traditional style dark ride, because it's soooo character-driven. The undersea kingdom is potentially a fascinating setting, but the film doesn't explore it much, so while you could build a ride that did, it wouldn't feel authentic to the movie. By contrast, Alice in Wonderland is perfect dark ride material because the movie is all about Alice wandering through a weird setting. The easiest way to make a traditional dark ride out of a Disney movie is to pick one where the story is about the character(s) traveling through a cool setting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Co Foo
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike_M View Post

    Click image for larger version

Name:	C7A41CFB-5888-4CA7-80B4-624F1904A685.jpeg
Views:	493
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    While not AA, Humphrey was there for a short time a couple years ago.
    I can't even look at his face without laughing. Classic Disney character.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sun Bonnet
    replied
    Originally posted by Karalora View Post
    Part of the problem I have with questions like this is that what makes for an enjoyable (and perhaps underrated) movie is not necessarily the same thing that makes for a good theme park attraction. Especially since the start of the Disney Renaissance, the movies tend to be all about fascinating characters, whereas the best rides are about settings or experiences, because the "characters" that really matter are the guests. There needs to be a sense of participation for the guests, and rides that just try to replicate the major beats of a film in third-person perspective (because look! It's your favorite characters!) aren't going to provide that.
    So true. I think you talked about the Little Mermaid ride in another thread? I loved the movie. I must have watched it every day for close to a year after getting the VHS tape. But the ride... the best part is going underwater. I don't want to see Ariel in every room. I grew up on the Snow White ride and am used to being in the lead character's footsteps.It would be so much more fun to experience Flotsam and Jetsum upsetting our boat along the river than watching the kiss scene.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by Karalora View Post
    Part of the problem I have with questions like this is that what makes for an enjoyable (and perhaps underrated) movie is not necessarily the same thing that makes for a good theme park attraction. Especially since the start of the Disney Renaissance, the movies tend to be all about fascinating characters, whereas the best rides are about settings or experiences, because the "characters" that really matter are the guests. There needs to be a sense of participation for the guests, and rides that just try to replicate the major beats of a film in third-person perspective (because look! It's your favorite characters!) aren't going to provide that.
    Spot on. That's why Fantasyland's original dark rides deliberately did not include Cinderella, even though it was the Studio's biggest hit in the decade before the opening of Disneyland. The first dark ride to be added after the Park opened was Alice in Wonderland, based on a film that was an under-performer at the box office. During the first 30 years of Disneyland's history, Imagineers followed Walt's philosophy that theme park attractions are an entirely different medium from film, and that IP adaptations must be done accordingly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Karalora
    replied
    Part of the problem I have with questions like this is that what makes for an enjoyable (and perhaps underrated) movie is not necessarily the same thing that makes for a good theme park attraction. Especially since the start of the Disney Renaissance, the movies tend to be all about fascinating characters, whereas the best rides are about settings or experiences, because the "characters" that really matter are the guests. There needs to be a sense of participation for the guests, and rides that just try to replicate the major beats of a film in third-person perspective (because look! It's your favorite characters!) aren't going to provide that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Undaunted Mansion
    replied
    I wholeheartedly agree about Treasure Planet, one of the few Disney IPs that would actually make sense in Tomorrowland (Star Wars, Toy Story, Finding Nemo, and Tron, delightful as they may be, are clearly not set in the future).

    I'll second the call for a Robin Hood attraction in Fantasyland (yes, it's often referred to as "sticks and stones" animation, which essentially means that its setting is too indistinct to base an attraction on, but I want it anyway). I'd also like to see more of a Pocahontas presence (Frontierland, perhaps).

    But what I'd like most is some smaller attractions representing the anthology films from the 1940s. Bumble Boogie would fit nicely in either New Orleans Square or Fantasyland (interesting fact: no merchandise has ever been made featuring Bumble the bee, which is a shame, because he's adorable). Johnny Fedora and Alice Bluebonnet, while perhaps not enough to justify a ride, could easily be featured on Main Street somehow. And I wouldn't mind the addition of a singing animatronic Willie the Whale to the Main Street Opera House.

    Leave a comment:


  • whoever
    replied
    The Society of Explorers and Adventurers. It has sprinkles in some parks, but it's such a great IP, that it should be capitalized on. Heck, bring back the Explorer's club, but put it in DTD this time. Sneak some reference material into the Jungle Cruise while you are at it.

    Leave a comment:

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