Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Guesses at cost of future ticket prices for Disneyland

Collapse

Get Away Today

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Guesses at cost of future ticket prices for Disneyland

    After reading about Chapek’s vision to have more dynamic pricing and a better park experience, what do you think the ticket prices will look like? What would you be willing to pay for a day at Disneyland with limited capacity and or rides? Prior to closure, a peak day was $150. I’ll guess that a ticket to Disneyland is $300-350 to account for fewer people allowed to enter. This is on par with what they charged for the Pixar Pier sneak peak.

  • #2
    Charging $300 in this economy would be nuts. Even WDW isn't even doing that!

    My guess, we may have a wider price range per day. With Tickets varies between $100-120 for 2 more days(instead of just 1 day variable tickets).
    Slightly off Topic:
    I still think Chapek is playing a dangerous game. He's for immediate profit in the short term (AKA"You can stream our movies NOW"!). And not bothering to think about long term problems. Llike why would someone pay extra for a new movie now, only for it to become free on Disney+ in 4 to 6 months

    Any long term statement Chapek claims to say, came from someone else already. Like current WarnerMedia CEO, Jason Kilar!

    Comment


    • #3
      I think you will see tickets at roughly the price they were before. The more interesting question will be do they allow for park hoping or will they continue DCA as a touch of Disney with some attractions added to it and have Disneyland a separate ticket?
      BGood! It's not just my motto its my name!

      Comment


      • #4
        The trouble with comparing special events like the “sneak peak” and “touch of Disney”, is that their prices reflect limited availability. These cost more because they are scarcer than an “everyday” ticket.

        While yes, an everyday ticket is going to be scarcer than before times, it simply won’t be as limited in number. If Disneyland is open everyday of the week, then you don’t need to fight for your ticket in the same way. Thus, it is worth less.

        Additionally, there is less competition right now. Theaters and many other entertainment attractions are not open or are also limited. Of course Disney is selling out at high prices right now; there is nothing to do.

        Comment


        • #5
          I think for the short term, Disney is going to milk that “dynamic pricing”... but when things slow down and demand falls, Disney can just as easily lower the price of tickets.

          Who knows. Maybe demand for Disneyland will remain the same (high, thus expensive)? I read an article that WDW was mostly booked out, and it’s been open for a while with higher capacity? Of course, that’s WDW, a tourist destination. It’ll be interesting to see how Disneyland fairs in these California waters, especially after sun setting the local AP program. So much is still unknown.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm guessing it will be close to what the pre-pandemic pricing was, but every day will be peak pricing, so about $150. I think they need good PR, and if they are charging $300 per ticket, that would do more long term harm than good.

            That is if they don't do dayparting. If they have 2 sessions in the day, I could see them charging $100-125 per session to increase their revenue without damaging PR, so an individual could pay $250 for the full day, or just $125 for the morning, and they could pass it off as fairness.



            Comment


            • #7
              Considering they will likely use Park Pass for the foreseeable future, the idea of being able to purchase a ticket without making a Park Pass is probably out.

              I think the idea of sessions will be only in use at DCA. DL will probably be the big ticket item @ $300 or even $350 for one day. If they open without Galaxy Edge or Fantasyland Dark rides I see the demand not being there for such a high price.

              DCA is doable in 3-5 Hours especially with Cut Capacity therefore two sessions at this park would work fine.

              8 AM- 1:30 PM

              3:00 PM- 8:30 PM

              The 90 Min break gives CMs time to sweep park, and get ready for next session

              $100/$125 seems like a perfect price point for each session


              Comment


              • #8
                DL ticket: All rides operating, small capacity: $249-299
                DL ticket: Outdoor rides only, small capacity: $199-219

                They can charge more because demand is higher and supply is lower.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by J. Thaddeus Toad View Post
                  DL ticket: All rides operating, small capacity: $249-299
                  DL ticket: Outdoor rides only, small capacity: $199-219

                  They can charge more because demand is higher and supply is lower.
                  It could happen, but a lot more than just supply and demand goes into pricing. Sure, the tickets may be in demand, but pricing them at more than double the current ticket would likely generate quite a bit of negative press, and it would also turn some people off, perhaps for good. The fact is, the people that are going to return early are diehard fans, you are going to make money off of them in a lot more ways than just the gate ticket. People not returning right away may look at that $300 dollar price tag which would likely not go down much in the long term and they may just put Disney out of their mind meaning there is lost potential future revenue as they seek out other things.

                  You also need to take into consideration how people value the tickets. If you are gouging, and at more than double the previous rate you are gouging, people will still purchase the ticket, but their mindset will likely be completely different, they will seek out other areas to save money. That may mean staying far fewer days, avoiding almost all extra purchases, not eating on property or bringing in outside drinks and food rather than purchasing in the park. Those seem small, but if a family of four avoids extra purchases, you may make $800-900 more on the gate but lose out on $1000 or $1500 if they avoid souvenirs, food, and other extras throughout their stay.

                  It's all a balancing act.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lukey114 View Post
                    I'm guessing it will be close to what the pre-pandemic pricing was, but every day will be peak pricing, so about $150. I think they need good PR, and if they are charging $300 per ticket, that would do more long term harm than good.

                    That is if they don't do dayparting. If they have 2 sessions in the day, I could see them charging $100-125 per session to increase their revenue without damaging PR, so an individual could pay $250 for the full day, or just $125 for the morning, and they could pass it off as fairness.
                    I think you're right with 150, but if they do dayparting I think it will be more like 200 for a 12 hour day and 125 for 8 hours.
                    "I wish they all could be California Bears!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think they are about to find out the hard way what their data already showed over a million multiple visit per year guests already chose the lower overall cost of AP's for a reason. If they think a majority of AP'ers will go if they have to pay a day price I feel they may be wrong. When we first became AP'ers we talked easily 4-5 families into joining the ranks and they were all happy, when Disney opens back up each of these families have said they will return when they can get some form of AP because " they are not paying the exploitation rates of the day tickets or the tourist tickets" as one of them calls it. Now that is a small sample but of the 5 families 100% refuse to pay for a day ticket. One even said on the day that canceled the AP program "whelp it was fun while it lasted looks like I am never going back there again." These are families with kids from young ones to teens and all would go at least a dozen times a year many staying on site at least once a year. All local OC'ers and now unless Disney gives them a AP again they are gone. The park will hit its new low capacity I am sure for a couple of weeks maybe even a month or two but if they are gouging I see that dwindling fast and this may be another SWGE scenario were it's desirable but not so much with high prices and crowds for many.
                      Disneyland Fan since the 70's

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Starcade View Post
                        I think they are about to find out the hard way what their data already showed over a million multiple visit per year guests already chose the lower overall cost of AP's for a reason. If they think a majority of AP'ers will go if they have to pay a day price I feel they may be wrong. When we first became AP'ers we talked easily 4-5 families into joining the ranks and they were all happy, when Disney opens back up each of these families have said they will return when they can get some form of AP because " they are not paying the exploitation rates of the day tickets or the tourist tickets" as one of them calls it. Now that is a small sample but of the 5 families 100% refuse to pay for a day ticket. One even said on the day that canceled the AP program "whelp it was fun while it lasted looks like I am never going back there again." These are families with kids from young ones to teens and all would go at least a dozen times a year many staying on site at least once a year. All local OC'ers and now unless Disney gives them a AP again they are gone.
                        They'll be back. Maybe not every year, but every other year they'll splurge on it. Just because they can't got every weekend and forget about the payments they've made month to month doesn't mean they won't go back once per year or every other. Let's be honest, the AP program was WAYYYYY underpriced for what you got and it was a guaranteed revenue stream. Now you'll see peaks and valleys in the revenue stream with discounts from time to time to flatten the curves.

                        Originally posted by linkeq2001 View Post
                        People not returning right away may look at that $300 dollar price tag which would likely not go down much in the long term and they may just put Disney out of their mind meaning there is lost potential future revenue as they seek out other things.
                        A park devoid of THRONGS of people filling up every possible space seems heavenly and worth that price.

                        You also need to take into consideration how people value the tickets. If you are gouging, and at more than double the previous rate you are gouging, people will still purchase the ticket, but their mindset will likely be completely different, they will seek out other areas to save money. .
                        First off, you don't understand what the word gouging means. Secondly, you CANNOT gouge a LUXURY VOLUNTARY EXPERIENCE. Disney has always been a premium experience and always will be. I would gladly pay double the ticket price for a MUCH improved park experience (and save on special seating costs), while still spending it up on food and lodgings. It's just an all around BETTER vacation.


                        Matt's 40th Birthday Disneyland Trip. Club 33, Napa Rose, and Adventureland Suite!!! ~~|~~ Katherine's 11th Birthday Dapper Day trip with Club 33 ~~|~~ Matt's Review of the Art of the Craft Tour at Disney's Grand Californian Hotel ~~|~~ My Spring, 2017 Dapper Day Trip Report ~~|~~ My Fall, 2016 Dapper Day and Club33 Trip Report ~~|~~ My Summer, 2016 Walt's LA tour with Bob Gurr and Marty Skylar ~~|~~ My Summer, 2016 Family Firsts Trip Report ~~|~~ Matt's September, 2015 Solo after the Safari Sunrise Trip Report ~~|~~ World Famous Jungle Cruise Safari Sunrise Premium Experience Trip Report ~~|~~ My February, 2015 Dapper Day Trip Report ~~|~~ My October, 2014 Family Vacation with Mickey's Halloween Party ~~|~~ My September, 2014 Dapper Day Trip Report ~~|~~ My August, 2014 Solo Trip Report - 1901/C33 Jazz Club ~~|~~ My June, 2014 Solo Trip Report ~~|~~ My February, 2014 Dapper Day Trip Report ~~|~~ My Epic May, 2013 Trip Report ~~|~~ My October, 2011 Trip Report ~~|~~ My October, 2010 Trip Report

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          opps...I posted in another post of the price, thinking I was in the correct topic...well, $500.00 was my estimate...
                          I am old. But still love Disneyland.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by whoever View Post

                            They'll be back. Maybe not every year, but every other year they'll splurge on it. Just because they can't got every weekend and forget about the payments they've made month to month doesn't mean they won't go back once per year or every other. Let's be honest, the AP program was WAYYYYY underpriced for what you got and it was a guaranteed revenue stream. Now you'll see peaks and valleys in the revenue stream with discounts from time to time to flatten the curves.


                            A park devoid of THRONGS of people filling up every possible space seems heavenly and worth that price.



                            First off, you don't understand what the word gouging means. Secondly, you CANNOT gouge a LUXURY VOLUNTARY EXPERIENCE. Disney has always been a premium experience and always will be. I would gladly pay double the ticket price for a MUCH improved park experience (and save on special seating costs), while still spending it up on food and lodgings. It's just an all around BETTER vacation.

                            Gouging is ENTIRELY based on perception...so yes you can gouge on a luxury voluntary experience. If people feel ripped off or the public raises an eyebrow at an exorbitant price increase is Disney really going to be able to blast on their media channels that it's not gouging because its a luxury experience? No they would get slaughtered. PR 101.

                            You may feel like it's not gouging, but that would be your single opinion of the concept. There's a reason Disney has not solved their crowding issue by cancelling all APs and increasing the ticket prices fivefold.....because people would be unhappy and feel that the value of their dollar disappeared. Maybe a $300 ticket comes in and stays into the future, who knows? My money would definitely be on that not happening though, because sure a select number of people wouldn't care and probably would enjoy the experience, but in the long term when the gates open again and Disney relies on millions of visitors a year a $300/person ticket almost certainly loses them money when people stop spending on all the extras.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I think DLR is headed for an à la carte model of ticket pricing, marketed primarily to an upscale local/regional Disney branded lifestyle demographic. A basic fee (at least $100 to start; gradually increasing to well over $200) would get you entrance for shopping, dining, viewing a stripped-down slate of live entertainment and parades, and a free attraction like Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln. Rides would be purchased separately via smartphone apps and MagicBands, eventually increasing to prices that would shock us today but which the target demographic will readily accept.

                              "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                              it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                              together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                              designed to appeal to everyone."

                              - Walt Disney

                              "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                              - Michael Eisner

                              "It's very symbiotic."
                              - Bob Chapek

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I mean, I would have to see how long lines are...but 150 bucks for the park without Fantastmic? Fire Works and Parades? seems kinda buts but Disney fans are like addicts and need a hit this year bad.
                                Happy Halloween!!!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by JerrodDRagon View Post
                                  I mean, I would have to see how long lines are...but 150 bucks for the park without Fantastmic? Fire Works and Parades? seems kinda buts but Disney fans are like addicts and need a hit this year bad.
                                  Yep. But that's only the beginning. The combination of high demand and the necessity of running the parks at partial attendance is a golden opportunity for Disney to "cull the crowds" of those on the left side of the expendable-income bell curve. Raising prices pushes the curve to the right, toward the more economically advantaged portion of the branded-lifestyle demographic. The result would be greater profits from fewer customers -- as well as shifting the public perception of the brand toward premium/upscale, which permits even more price increases.

                                  Sure, people will complain that Disney is marketing DLR to those who are more economically advantaged. But it won't even nick the edge of the profit margin. Those who can't afford DLR can go to Knotts, or Six Flags.

                                  And if the strategy backfires in the future, so what? Disney can always go back to the E-Z Monthly Payment AP program.
                                  "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                                  it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                                  together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                                  designed to appeal to everyone."

                                  - Walt Disney

                                  "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                                  - Michael Eisner

                                  "It's very symbiotic."
                                  - Bob Chapek

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by linkeq2001 View Post

                                    Gouging is ENTIRELY based on perception...so yes you can gouge on a luxury voluntary experience. If people feel ripped off or the public raises an eyebrow at an exorbitant price increase is Disney really going to be able to blast on their media channels that it's not gouging because its a luxury experience? No they would get slaughtered. PR 101.

                                    You may feel like it's not gouging, but that would be your single opinion of the concept. There's a reason Disney has not solved their crowding issue by cancelling all APs and increasing the ticket prices fivefold.....because people would be unhappy and feel that the value of their dollar disappeared. Maybe a $300 ticket comes in and stays into the future, who knows? My money would definitely be on that not happening though, because sure a select number of people wouldn't care and probably would enjoy the experience, but in the long term when the gates open again and Disney relies on millions of visitors a year a $300/person ticket almost certainly loses them money when people stop spending on all the extras.
                                    You CANNOT gouge. Period. Ever. Transactions only occur when there are mutually agreed upon exchange from seller to buyer. I actually despise all law-codified "anti-gouging" laws. Not sure why the government needs to step in and regulate free trade. The seller doesn't HAVE to sell their product/service at anything less than they are willing to voluntarily sell it for and a buyer is free to NOT buy said product/service if they feel the cost of their fiat money does not justify the value gained by purchasing said product/service. The law of supply and demand always reaches an equilibrium and determines the market value of said product/service. Gouging is a term used by people who want something for less than the FMV price.
                                    Matt's 40th Birthday Disneyland Trip. Club 33, Napa Rose, and Adventureland Suite!!! ~~|~~ Katherine's 11th Birthday Dapper Day trip with Club 33 ~~|~~ Matt's Review of the Art of the Craft Tour at Disney's Grand Californian Hotel ~~|~~ My Spring, 2017 Dapper Day Trip Report ~~|~~ My Fall, 2016 Dapper Day and Club33 Trip Report ~~|~~ My Summer, 2016 Walt's LA tour with Bob Gurr and Marty Skylar ~~|~~ My Summer, 2016 Family Firsts Trip Report ~~|~~ Matt's September, 2015 Solo after the Safari Sunrise Trip Report ~~|~~ World Famous Jungle Cruise Safari Sunrise Premium Experience Trip Report ~~|~~ My February, 2015 Dapper Day Trip Report ~~|~~ My October, 2014 Family Vacation with Mickey's Halloween Party ~~|~~ My September, 2014 Dapper Day Trip Report ~~|~~ My August, 2014 Solo Trip Report - 1901/C33 Jazz Club ~~|~~ My June, 2014 Solo Trip Report ~~|~~ My February, 2014 Dapper Day Trip Report ~~|~~ My Epic May, 2013 Trip Report ~~|~~ My October, 2011 Trip Report ~~|~~ My October, 2010 Trip Report

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

                                      Yep. But that's only the beginning. The combination of high demand and the necessity of running the parks at partial attendance is a golden opportunity for Disney to "cull the crowds" of those on the left side of the expendable-income bell curve. Raising prices pushes the curve to the right, toward the more economically advantaged portion of the branded-lifestyle demographic. The result would be greater profits from fewer customers -- as well as shifting the public perception of the brand toward premium/upscale, which permits even more price increases.

                                      Sure, people will complain that Disney is marketing DLR to those who are more economically advantaged. But it won't even nick the edge of the profit margin. Those who can't afford DLR can go to Knotts, or Six Flags.

                                      And if the strategy backfires in the future, so what? Disney can always go back to the E-Z Monthly Payment AP program.
                                      Its True...Disney for sure can do what they want.

                                      I will wait and see I have a Universal AP/Six Flags so will have more than enough to do this summer
                                      Happy Halloween!!!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by whoever View Post

                                        You CANNOT gouge. Period. Ever. Transactions only occur when there are mutually agreed upon exchange from seller to buyer. I actually despise all law-codified "anti-gouging" laws. Not sure why the government needs to step in and regulate free trade. The seller doesn't HAVE to sell their product/service at anything less than they are willing to voluntarily sell it for and a buyer is free to NOT buy said product/service if they feel the cost of their fiat money does not justify the value gained by purchasing said product/service. The law of supply and demand always reaches an equilibrium and determines the market value of said product/service. Gouging is a term used by people who want something for less than the FMV price.
                                        I mean, sure I guess you can think of it that way if you want to use a very narrow and specific definition of the term from a completely free market perspective....that perspective is in part why America’s healthcare system charges insurance companies and patients far more for drugs etc because the market dictates it can.

                                        Disney’s image means more than anything to it, and outside of its parks Disney is most definitely NOT defining itself as a luxury brand, it defines itself as a part of every middle “Americans” childhood and now with Star Wars and Marvel a part of people’s entertainment. So yes, they could charge $300 bucks a head and likely still have a busy park. But up to now they never have, why? Because even if someone is never going to go to the park more than once in their life at current prices they still feel attached, the brand becomes part of their consumer identity. Increase prices beyond a certain point and public perception shifts, and the company loses money.

                                        I suppose the surge pricing in Texas during the blackouts that cost people thousands of dollars wasn’t gouging either? I mean you could have just voluntarily shut your power off in that transaction and froze to death right?

                                        I agree with and appreciate lots of your posts but here I disagree, it’s perception and concrete free market rules etc need not apply to consumers minds.

                                        Comment

                                        Get Away Today Footer

                                        Collapse
                                        Working...
                                        X