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  • [Chat] The Affordability of Visiting the Disneyland Resort

    Stumbled upon this article and thought of it as an informative read.

    People who make under $75,000 per year are most eager to visit Disney, but it's almost unaffordable for them
    https://www.insider.com/middle-class...y-parks-2021-6

    Key points in the article:
    • According to a new Insider poll, people who make less than $75,000 per year are the most likely to consider visiting Disney destinations. However, as Insider has previously reported, the theme-giant has become too expensive for the average American family — meaning some of the company's biggest fans can't afford a trip.
    • Specifically, those who said they earn between $50,000 and $74,999 per year were seemingly the most eager to visit Disney.
    • Those who said they earn between $25,000 to $49,999 per year were the second largest group to say they'd consider visiting a Disney park this year.
    • People who said their yearly income is between $150,000 and $199,999 were the least interested in visiting Disney destinations this year, with only eight respondents saying they "definitely would" or "probably would" visit.
    • More than 50% of respondents both with children and without said they feel Disney vacations are too expensive "in general" to warrant a trip. Another 32% of participants with children said they'd like to visit a Disney property but can't afford to.
    The article also touches on Disney's ticket inflation, and how it markets itself as a premier vacation spot (they mostly allude to WDW, but I imagine the same could be applied to DLR).

    I'm intrigued by the results of the survey. I did not expect those with higher incomes to not be swayed into purchasing tickets. I wonder where the sweet spot is? Did Disney meet their limit? Or is it just a hiccup/sign of the times?

  • #2
    Very interesting article. Not that it will matter to Disney -- they'll automatically blow off any SurveyMonkey data as unreliable.

    Under Chapek's command, Disney is about to conduct an interesting experiment, using DLR as the test rat -- er, mouse. The experiment will determine if brand affiliation is strong enough to compel sufficient numbers of Disney's customer base to spend significantly more money on a significantly lessened product.
    "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
    it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
    together with every variety of recreation and fun,
    designed to appeal to everyone."

    - Walt Disney

    "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
    - Michael Eisner

    "It's very symbiotic."
    - Bob Chapek

    Comment


    • #3
      It will be interesting to see how the current revenue at the parks compare to pre-pandemic. The parks are starting to get crowded. Not horrible nightmare crowded like before, but busy. And every person I see walking around is $$$ because they bought a ticket to get in. I have a feeling Disney will like the results compared to 2019.

      Comment


      • #4
        I can understand the upper income earners being less interested in a Disney vacation (whether that be WDW or DLR). On average, since your disposable income will vary largely dependent on where you live in the country, those with incomes of $150k+ are probably more likely to spend the same cash equivalent for trips to Europe, Hawaii, etc...See places they can't or don't see elsewhere (one could argue that a lot of people view DLR as a theme park and once you've seen one, you've seen them all sort of mentality). We go to Europe every other year or so, for example, and a trip to Europe costs us on average less than it did for a trip to WDW this past April.

        ​​​​​​Before we were at our current income levels, we were able to afford multiple trips a year to DLR because of our APs. When you don't have the added expense of tickets for each trip, it becomes more manageable when you're just looking at hotel and food costs. Now, we could afford it even still without, but I won't pay it. I've already said we'll be doing other trips elsewhere.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
          Very interesting article. Not that it will matter to Disney -- they'll automatically blow off any SurveyMonkey data as unreliable.

          Under Chapek's command, Disney is about to conduct an interesting experiment, using DLR as the test rat -- er, mouse. The experiment will determine if brand affiliation is strong enough to compel sufficient numbers of Disney's customer base to spend significantly more money on a significantly lessened product.
          Mr Wiggins, I wonder how many will truly understand how profound your statement really is. One of the best summaries of what is taking place.

          How interesting that higher income people are the least interested. At the Newport Coast level, I can tell you there is little to no interest in Disney right now, they know the value is degraded.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by SuperHappyCM View Post
            It will be interesting to see how the current revenue at the parks compare to pre-pandemic. The parks are starting to get crowded. Not horrible nightmare crowded like before, but busy. And every person I see walking around is $$$ because they bought a ticket to get in. I have a feeling Disney will like the results compared to 2019.
            You do realize that the admission ticket price has very little to do with revenue and operating costs far out way the price of admission. If every person you see is double fisting a churro and has a bag full of merch then you see revenue.
            BGood! It's not just my motto its my name!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SuperHappyCM View Post
              It will be interesting to see how the current revenue at the parks compare to pre-pandemic. The parks are starting to get crowded. Not horrible nightmare crowded like before, but busy. And every person I see walking around is $$$ because they bought a ticket to get in. I have a feeling Disney will like the results compared to 2019.
              You are also not considering the repeatability of a Disney vacation. We are currently seeing moderate attendance due to pent-up demand. Many customers have said they won't buy another ticket until new membership is announced. Families that saved for a trip will need the time to save again. That doesn't guarantee a constant stream of people coming through the turnstiles, which Disney wants badly.

              Comment


              • #8
                1,086! This is all the more people that were surveyed, so not really something to put any value in. Also no mention of how many of them made less or more than the numbers provided...just percentages. Also the question asked was...."Would you visit a Disney theme park this year?" and that was on May 13th....almost halfway through the year. Maybe some people of this VERY VERY VERY WEAK sample size already had their vacations planned out since they didn't know when Disney was reopening. Heck I don't make much money but I wish I could do a lot of things that I can't afford as well. To me this is a pretty lazily written article with no substance. Writing an article based on a survey and not showing all the numbers involved, then you aren't telling the whole story, you're just cherry picking stats.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dougy View Post
                  1,086! This is all the more people that were surveyed, so not really something to put any value in. Also no mention of how many of them made less or more than the numbers provided...just percentages. --- Writing an article based on a survey and not showing all the numbers involved, then you aren't telling the whole story, you're just cherry picking stats.
                  8 responders out of 1,086 is less than 1% of the group. These are the people in the income bracket chapek seems to think will save him. 1%

                  There is actually a lot of other data that can be extrapolated if you just do the math.
                  Disneyland Fan since the 70's

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dougy View Post
                    1,086! This is all the more people that were surveyed, so not really something to put any value in. Also no mention of how many of them made less or more than the numbers provided...just percentages. Also the question asked was...."Would you visit a Disney theme park this year?" and that was on May 13th....almost halfway through the year. Maybe some people of this VERY VERY VERY WEAK sample size already had their vacations planned out since they didn't know when Disney was reopening. Heck I don't make much money but I wish I could do a lot of things that I can't afford as well. To me this is a pretty lazily written article with no substance. Writing an article based on a survey and not showing all the numbers involved, then you aren't telling the whole story, you're just cherry picking stats.
                    This...

                    It is so easy to make a survey say whatever you want if you only pick out the information that confirms what you want your clickbait article to be called. Most news these days is just giving readers what they want to read. There is likely SOME legitimacy here, but it would be ridiculous to think that Disney hasn't done much better and more extensive surveying that backs up their current pricing strategy.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by xPhoenix View Post

                      This...

                      It is so easy to make a survey say whatever you want if you only pick out the information that confirms what you want your clickbait article to be called. Most news these days is just giving readers what they want to read. There is likely SOME legitimacy here, but it would be ridiculous to think that Disney hasn't done much better and more extensive surveying that backs up their current pricing strategy.
                      Yes, but who's at the helm? Chapek.

                      The "extensive surveying" didn't do Galaxy's Edge any favors.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I am fortunate enough to live in South County in a area where the medium household income is well above $75K and all my neighbors and school parents are buzzing on how they feel DLR got too greedy and they are all now looking at options for alternative vacations and places to go. Hawaii has been a very popular destination the past couple of weeks and as the price is much cheaper than a trip up the road to Anaheim now. Some have looked into WDW as the cost to go there for 5 days is not much different than staying on site at DLR for 5 days. It's been a ground swell and is now a common topic at the few times we find ourselves in groups such as school or kids sporting events etc. Everyone is asking about other theme parks and various other fun places to go that are in driving distance. I knew some people would be frustrated and find the prices exploitive enough to not go ( like myself ) but I had no idea would gain the traction is has around here.

                        I feel for the CM's as the parks are going to start being filled more and more with guests that are stretching themselves further and further to afford their trip so than they will expect more "for their money" leading to some horribly entitled folks. A guest who feels they are getting a good ROI is more likely to turn a blind eye to a limited food option or a light amount of staff, somebody who can visit frequently cares lil about a ride being down or a line that is too long they can comeback and catch it on the next visit. A guest that has put their annual vacation budget into a single magical trip but instead: is not able to eat when they want without heavy planning or is thinking the parks would be lightly trafficked to find lots of extended lines and crowds, or a lack of attractions or the VQ to ride said attractions will unfortunately be looking for the first CM's ear they can violate.
                        Last edited by Starcade; 06-04-2021, 09:50 AM.
                        Disneyland Fan since the 70's

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Golden Zephyr View Post

                          Mr Wiggins, I wonder how many will truly understand how profound your statement really is. One of the best summaries of what is taking place.

                          How interesting that higher income people are the least interested. At the Newport Coast level, I can tell you there is little to no interest in Disney right now, they know the value is degraded.
                          I used to work at the Barnes and Noble in Fashion Island and during the summer we would serve a very high number of tourists. I would make conversation with them and they said they liked going to the beach or maybe going to Hollywood. Not one time did any of these tourists mention they were going to Disneyland. If I recall I even asked them if they were going but they told me no and had no interest in going.

                          It isn't as if the wealthy do not like traveling. They do. It is just they prefer much more luxury and service in exchange for the amount they are paying. They are wealthy partly because they are frugal. And while a Disneyland vacation may provide luxury and service for those in the $25,000 - $75,000 income bracket, the luxury and service Disneyland provides to persons in the upper brackets are way below what they are generally accustomed to.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post
                            Very interesting article. Not that it will matter to Disney -- they'll automatically blow off any SurveyMonkey data as unreliable.

                            Under Chapek's command, Disney is about to conduct an interesting experiment, using DLR as the test rat -- er, mouse. The experiment will determine if brand affiliation is strong enough to compel sufficient numbers of Disney's customer base to spend significantly more money on a significantly lessened product.
                            If Disney turns out to have miscalculated in this regard then they are in for a whole new world of hurt. I'm no waltaboo, but he got it right when he said "If we lose them, we'll have to spend ten times as much to get them back." Disney is banking on a few types of guests, all of whom I think are misguided in some sense:
                            1. Die-hard loyalists, who don't care what Disney is selling them and for how much, as long as Disney's the one selling it.
                            2. People who can afford it without much trouble, and find the higher cost a selling point in itself because it makes the park more exclusive and prestigious.
                            3. People for whom the expenditure hurts, and who will therefore convince themselves that they're having the most magical experience ever, because otherwise they've wasted more money than they can afford to spend again, at least not for several years.
                            I'm not in any of these categories. I'm not brainwashed enough to be #1, rich and snooty enough to be #2, or naive enough to be #3. I think a lot of us former AP holders (I let mine lapse even before lockdown started, because I was no longer sure I was using it enough to be worth the monthly bill) are that combination of savvy and thrifty, and that more than anything else is why Disney doesn't consider us a good risk anymore. We have standards, dangit. Who wants customers with standards?
                            Like this post? Read more like it at The Disneyland Dilettante!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Starcade View Post

                              8 responders out of 1,086 is less than 1% of the group. These are the people in the income bracket chapek seems to think will save him. 1%

                              There is actually a lot of other data that can be extrapolated if you just do the math.
                              So you think 1,086 people is a good sample size of a company that serves, on average (during more normal times) 50,000+ people A DAY is a good survey? Who are these people taking the survey? Have they been to Disneyland before? Do we know the exact numbers of people in each income bracket that took the survey? I am always up for learning more and seeing other perspectives...I understand you can get some other data from just doing the math. But what data will I get that I don't have that tells me this survey is a good representation of Disneyland guests? Are these guests that want to go to Disneyland going on other vacations instead? Or are they just answering that "I wish I could go to Disneyland!"

                              I didn't come across any of those answers, which is why I think this article is another lazy piece of "journalism" that we've come accustomed to lately.

                              With that being said...I do think Disney prices are getting ridiculous, but I could go off on a whole other topic on how the recent AP programs didn't do the company any favors on keeping prices down as a whole. I would love for prices to come back down...I'd love to come to the park from out of state and not have to wait in long lines with APer's that are there almost everyday because the program is way too affordable and overcrowding the park and stretching the CM's resources thin.

                              Sorry I am getting off topic. But my main point of this Insider article being lazy and a survey of 1,086 people not holding any weight still stands.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by DisneyIPresume View Post
                                And while a Disneyland vacation may provide luxury and service for those in the $25,000 - $75,000 income bracket, the luxury and service Disneyland provides to persons in the upper brackets are way below what they are generally accustomed to.
                                This is very true of the households I know who make $250k+ Annually they will go to Disneyland maybe once every couple of years for their kids sake but do not consider it a vacation destination at all because they feel DGC is far overpriced and not truly a 4 star hotel more of a 3.5 star only because of the amenities not so much the rooms. To them Disneyland is a park to visit not a resort worth staying at.

                                chapek is worth millions he rubs shoulders with other wealthy folks daily but those folks likely do not often live near DLR enough to likely be giving him any constructive feedback other then further ways to exploit customers. (aka CEO shop talk)
                                Disneyland Fan since the 70's

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Starcade View Post
                                  ...I feel for the CM's as the parks are going to start being filled more and more with guests that are stretching themselves further and further to afford their trip so than they will expect more "for their money" leading to some horribly entitled folks. A guest who feels they are getting a good ROI is more likely to turn a blind eye to a limited food option or a light amount of staff, somebody who can visit frequently cares lil about a ride being down or a line that is too long they can comeback and catch it on the next visit. A guest that has put their annual vacation budget into a single magical trip but instead: is not able to eat when they want without heavy planning or is thinking the parks would be lightly trafficked to find lots of extended lines and crowds, or a lack of attractions or the VQ to ride said attractions will unfortunately be looking for the first CM's ear they can violate.
                                  ka-Bingo. Disney management may want to dig into their notoriously short institutional memory and look at what happened at DLR when they added a no-interest monthly payment plan to their AP program. They may want to consider how it affected their attendance -- and especially their customer demographic curve.

                                  "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
                                  it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
                                  together with every variety of recreation and fun,
                                  designed to appeal to everyone."

                                  - Walt Disney

                                  "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
                                  - Michael Eisner

                                  "It's very symbiotic."
                                  - Bob Chapek

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Dougy View Post

                                    So you think 1,086 people is a good sample size of a company that serves, on average (during more normal times) 50,000+ people A DAY is a good survey? Who are these people taking the survey? Have they been to Disneyland before? Do we know the exact numbers of people in each income bracket that took the survey? I am always up for learning more and seeing other perspectives...I understand you can get some other data from just doing the math. But what data will I get that I don't have that tells me this survey is a good representation of Disneyland guests? Are these guests that want to go to Disneyland going on other vacations instead? Or are they just answering that "I wish I could go to Disneyland!"

                                    I didn't come across any of those answers, which is why I think this article is another lazy piece of "journalism" that we've come accustomed to lately.

                                    With that being said...I do think Disney prices are getting ridiculous, but I could go off on a whole other topic on how the recent AP programs didn't do the company any favors on keeping prices down as a whole. I would love for prices to come back down...I'd love to come to the park from out of state and not have to wait in long lines with APer's that are there almost everyday because the program is way too affordable and overcrowding the park and stretching the CM's resources thin.

                                    Sorry I am getting off topic. But my main point of this Insider article being lazy and a survey of 1,086 people not holding any weight still stands.
                                    I personally believe this is a good survey because...

                                    SurveyMonkey Audience polls from a national sample balanced by census data of age and gender. Respondents are incentivized to complete surveys through charitable contributions. Generally speaking, digital polling tends to skew toward people with access to the internet. SurveyMonkey Audience doesn't try to weigh its sample based on race or income. Polling data collected 1,086 respondents May 13, 2021, with a 3 percentage point margin of error.

                                    The survey is not for current Disney guests or loyalists specifically; rather, the whole point of the survey is to paint a picture regarding interest in relation to income from a random pool of people. Whether they have been to Disneyland or not shouldn't matter.

                                    I don't know how this article could be considered lazy because it actually collected some form of data, and didn't just strictly go by opinion.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Dougy View Post

                                      So you think 1,086 people is a good sample size of a company that serves, on average (during more normal times) 50,000+ people A DAY is a good survey?
                                      Hmm that's interesting, I do not remember I saying it was?

                                      I was trying to gently remind you that some simple math can give you some of the breakdown numbers you claimed were missing.

                                      But while we are here and I have your attention, try as a journalist to get a 1,000 people to answer your survey honestly and do the due diligence that goes with it. The article may not be remotely worthy of a Pulitzer but I would not call it lazy.
                                      Disneyland Fan since the 70's

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

                                        look at what happened at DLR when they added a no-interest monthly payment plan to their AP program.
                                        If memory serves me I believe they saw one of the largest surges in attendance, correct? They could have turned off that tap at any time in previous years and with little negative press about it. but didn't...odd.

                                        More customers is obviously a bad thing for business, so they would totally avoid doing that again because they as a large corporation hate having a crowded park. I think Target and Walmart are going to start limiting their shoppers as well as they want a more empty store so their shoppers can walk around more freely.
                                        Disneyland Fan since the 70's

                                        Comment

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