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  • WaltDisney'sAlec
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

    One strategy that would keep the locals and tourists happy is to give them a product that makes them feel they're getting great value for their money. A product with enough innovation and "wow factor" that they'll want to return again and again.

    Superhero figures on a stick and video games with yesterday's tech ain't gonna do it.
    And even then, calling Jack-Jack a superhero figure, when he's not even old enough to talk, is charitable!

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagleman
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

    Superhero figures on a stick and video games with yesterday's tech ain't gonna do it.
    IMO_ "Sure not going do it for Me"

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain Andy
    replied
    ^ I agree with Mr. Wiggins. And I would even go so far as to say if crowding is an issue, DLR should simply make a permanent cap on attendance (maybe 75% or so)? I think that would create at least some illusion that they care about guest concerns in regards to crowding.

    However, I don't think anyone's wishes will be met.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by linkeq2001 View Post
    ...I completely understand the desire to keep the AP program as it was, but I read through all these threads and as I’ve stated in another discussion there are pretty decidedly two camps. One side who wants the program back largely as is and ones who despise it. It seems like lot of tourists (including people here) conflate the AP program with lots of the problems in DLR, I’d argue that is also something Chapek is trying to combat. DLR relies on its local population, but that alone is not nearly enough to keep it going, and if tourists start shying away because of crowding etc (something people may be hyper aware of after the pandemic) then DLR has a problem. It’s an impossible balancing act in Anaheim of keeping the locals happy and keeping the tourists happy because while the locals provide the nice safe income the tourists keep that entire section of Anaheim running.
    One strategy that would keep the locals and tourists happy is to give them a product that makes them feel they're getting great value for their money. A product with enough innovation and "wow factor" that they'll want to return again and again.

    Superhero figures on a stick and video games with yesterday's tech ain't gonna do it.

    Last edited by Mr Wiggins; 06-09-2021, 08:19 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • linkeq2001
    replied
    I think a lot of people speaking about out of town tourists are speaking about a wave in terms of restrictions being over and not being required to quarantine as both Canadians and Australians are currently required to do.

    In terms of a DLR trip or a WDW trip...as someone who lives in Canada, DLR is by FAR the destination of choice for virtually everyone in the western provinces. The California parks are marketed far far more to us than WDW. In addition, when our dollar is down we get pretty substantial discounts on park tickets to compensate predominantly for DLR. if you are thinking in terms of Australians, the flight is already quite long and adding another three to five hours just for a Disney vacation is not usually the norm. I think the argument that WDW is the premiere destination for guests from those to countries is a little short sighted.

    I completely understand the desire to keep the AP program as it was, but I read through all these threads and as I’ve stated in another discussion there are pretty decidedly two camps. One side who wants the program back largely as is and ones who despise it. It seems like lot of tourists (including people here) conflate the AP program with lots of the problems in DLR, I’d argue that is also something Chapek is trying to combat. DLR relies on its local population, but that alone is not nearly enough to keep it going, and if tourists start shying away because of crowding etc (something people may be hyper aware of after the pandemic) then DLR has a problem. It’s an impossible balancing act in Anaheim of keeping the locals happy and keeping the tourists happy because while the locals provide the nice safe income the tourists keep that entire section of Anaheim running.
    Last edited by linkeq2001; 06-09-2021, 07:32 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Starcade
    replied
    Originally posted by WaltDisney'sAlec View Post
    Based on Chapek's comments, all I can think of is that they canceled APs because they didn't want to flood the reservations while at limited capacity with guests who might not be high-spenders. And if that was his worry, he should have just rationed AP visits or suspended them for as long as capacity is limited. Cancelling everyone, creating this huge headache, etc. was just poor business.
    Spot on, if you have limited capacity you want it to go to those paying the most. They also know they can't fill the parks without AP's but they want to make it seems as though AP's are a ways off (why they do not simply put AP's on hold as this may actually upset people more than simply cancelling and refunding) They hope some of those waiting for AP's will grow impatient give in and go maybe once or twice helping to fill the limited capacity alongside the full price ticket visitors. They know they can get enough to fill their reduced capacity between the pent up demand from the FOMO crowd and those that never had AP's at least for the short term, which based on the huge dropp in booked days seems to be coming to a close, remember most people buying tickets do not follow forums and Disney Parks news so their plans are based on simply their desire to go. The percentage that are holding out until the parks open fully to book etc. are but a fraction. Those that are waiting for the new AP's are a huge chunk, one that chapek and co. are trying to figure out just how far they can push. I would not be surprised in the least to see maybe the top two AP's released first just to see how many they can sway to buy into to those and then if they still need more to fill the parks introduce a lower tiered option(s) months later after they got those that can afford it to buy into highest tiers. I fully expect the reservation system to be in place for all passes going forward and the higher tiers may include the ability to book more days in advance and or hold more reservations at once based on the survey I received months ago.

    I see the future Affinity Program (AP) doing the following possibilities to limit pop-ins and what they see as over use (if that is the real issue) this is based on what I have seen them do in the past their stated desire and the survey I received months ago and I have the most likely listed first with the less likely at the bottom:

    - Increased Price
    - Reservations required
    - Increase in Blockout days
    - Higher Tiers can hold more reservations simultanousely
    - Parking not included at any level
    - Discounts on food and merch reduced
    - Removal of interest free payment plan
    - Max Cap on visits per month (they like having people fill in the parks in the evening when many families go home but are not excited about Friday night teens and young adults)
    - Tiering the days vie a point system. Ex: Friday & Sat=red, Sun= Green, Tues-Thurs=blue, beyond block out days you also have points and blue days cost less points than say red
    - Both annual and Seasonal Passes ( Summer, Fall/Winter, Winter/Spring with W/S spring possibly being cheaper as this is the closest they have to offseason now)

    Based on reports the AP numbers were starting to dwindle and many feel that was the reason attendance had begun dropping in 2019. This tells me they started to close in on the ceiling of what consumers were willing to spend for AP's. I posted a chart earlier that showed the dramatic increase in AP prices over Tickets for the last decade so I am sure they have the delta on how many folks they lost with each increase and have a sweet spot they are targeting.

    They have no worries about introducing the AP's in the future either as Wall Street will simply see it as a way to pack the park and will respond positively. The few that stomp their feet and take the "If others get to go more than me for cheaper I am not going" or "AP's fill the park (while claiming they aren't the majority) and I do not like a filled park". Well DLR knows that missing out on your once a year or every other year 5 day vacation spend will easily be replaced by 3-4 AP'ers that will spend just as much if not more per year (every year) while possibly requiring less resources on their end to impress and convince to return.

    Leave a comment:


  • WaltDisney'sAlec
    replied
    Originally posted by linkeq2001 View Post

    All true but keep in mind we are judging all of
    this with out of state tourism and international tourism effectively shut down. What do the parks look like with Canadians and Australians, two groups that make up a substantial portion of day tickets. Add in guests from out of state as well and you have a large number of potential clients that are not really able or reticent to come at the moment. Worrying about numbers now is like wondering why your restaurant isn’t making money when it’s open everyday but Friday and Saturday night. This is why part of me thinks they may hold off on a new AP program for the time being, it’s impossible to interpret the impact under normal market conditions right now. The fact that both parks are pretty busy even this long after the initial open under what are still very limited conditions is somewhat impressive.

    I totally agree with you about the Disney+ versus box office thing, steady month on month income is much better for a company than sporadic and less reliable spikes(though it makes knowing what a successful film versus an unsuccessful is very challenging). I respectfully don’t think the analogy quite works when you compare “subscribers” to a physical space like DLR though. Streaming takes nothing away from anyone’s experience and costs very little. Someone can have a sub and stream non stop and someone can have one and not stream at all and it costs the company a negligible difference. A. users actions also have no impact whatsoever on someone else. A membership to a theme park or zoo. Etc though means that person is taking physical space and requires staffing to handle their existence, there’s a much more immediate and substantial cost to the company tied to the actual use of the product. A number of “super users” also more directly negatively impacts other users, especially when the company has little control over when those subscribers choose to use the product.

    I’d argue there’s a much finer balance that needs to be taken into account with a subscription here and that’s likely what Disney is playing around with trying to find. Remember at these prices Disney is betting on a former SoCal AP only going roughly twice a year and a Deluxe four times a year to equal their previous ticket price....those seem like pretty good odds to me considering that no matter what Disney fans tend to keep coming back. I mean they could easily be wrong and this could be the straw that breaks the Disney fan camel’s back and we could see the AP program come back in a similar vein.....but four times a year to the park isn’t that much....
    Right, your point is well taken about Disneyland as a "good" rather than Disney+'s "deliverable" status that takes away nothing from the user experience. All the chatter from the surveys and Ken Potrock about a membership program will likely just mean stronger price differentiation. I definitely got the money's worth of my AP in terms of admission prices, and I only had it for 4 months. But it reminds me of the AMC A-List program, where you basically have a monthly membership to three movies a week for the price of about two tickets. It is only worth it to me if I can see enough movies to justify the price, and Disneyland's membership program will be no different when it finally delivers.

    That business model is okay with me, because it doesn't abandon those most loyal to the brand. It just feels like APs got hung out to dry and they didn't have a backup plan ready. With Disney+ or any other streaming platform, they are ready to start raising prices as soon as subscriber growth slows because they are leveraging that loyalty to the brand. Here, they raised prices, but treated APs as no different from any other guest. And that model is just so short-sighted that it is beyond frustrating.

    Based on Chapek's comments, all I can think of is that they canceled APs because they didn't want to flood the reservations while at limited capacity with guests who might not be high-spenders. And if that was his worry, he should have just rationed AP visits or suspended them for as long as capacity is limited. Cancelling everyone, creating this huge headache, etc. was just poor business.

    Originally posted by Starcade View Post
    I have not received the survey but I did get one back in like March maybe? I remember the questions were not about if I needed a AP to visit but with my AP what features were the most important and more importantly it seems which features were the least. ( i.e. what can they cut)

    Regarding the VQ issues... most AP'ers have grown accustomed to not being too concerned if they miss the VQ lottery as they know they will likely be returning soon on another day. ( We tried twice before COVID to get in to RotR and never did but where not too worried as we expected to return sooner than we thought) This same feeling happens when an AP'er visits the park to find their favorite attractions closed for refurb. "No biggie we'll catch it next time" The tourists that visit though, I feel for them missing out as their window is a fraction of what AP'ers have and if they miss something they likely have missed it for years or forever if they only get to take one trip in their lifetime.

    Also those saying we are about to see a wave of out of state and foreign visitors etc. I think this wave is smaller than we think, many of them are already going to WDW. If your going to be on plane for hours anyway WDW seems on paper to be a much better multi-day destination with more to do with more then twice as many parks and many more hotel options. Now you put in the price which by many accounts is far cheaper all around from food to lodging than I think all the tourists have already been flocking to WDW. I think chapek sees the data and he sees how the WDW ratio of domestic to foreign guests is smaller then under normal circumstances which tells him WDW is already cannibalizing from DLR when it comes to tourists. I think they also see July is still almost completely available even though June is almost booked up for single day DL. This may be the cliff they were looking for to re-introduce AP's and hence why the survey went out.

    I have been saying all along they are milking the desperation of FOMO customers to return as long as they can, it's their line they are trying to hold. I have also said they are likely holding it to end of summer as they will milk summer for what it's worth. This survey is perfect timing for them to announce the new AP by September.

    Also by September they can get their staffing under control which I have been hearing has been problematic. This is one of the key issues why they are limiting guests throughout the resort more so than the CA regulations.
    I got that same survey. I said all I cared about were the ticket prices, food discounts, and parking (long shot, I know).

    I agree with your point about the out-of-state/foreign visitors too. We get some Nevada/Arizona visitors, and maybe some Australia/B.C. visitors, but is it enough to make a dent? Remember, if Australians travel out of the country, they have to then quarantine for two weeks in Sydney, paying for a 4-star hotel out of pocket that entire time. Is a 5-day Disney trip worth it then? Probably not. Those desperate to travel are probably already at WDW. Those who come to DLR will likely be out-of-staters on tighter budgets who drive over and maybe spend 3 days here at most.

    And it's not like that is months away, or anything. Out of staters are allowed in 6 days, and capacity is increasing starting in July (and not to 100%). And yet, only a few days are fully booked for park-hoppers? We were getting surveys for month asking us about our COVID expectations, what features we wanted, etc. But if this kind of attendance is what they wanted, or even what they were expecting, I don't think we would be getting surveys at all regarding how we felt about the sudden removal of passes. That tells me they are, at the very least, worried.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tomorrowland67
    replied
    I haven't yet received a survey. I wonder if it's because I cancelled Disney Plus. I sent an email about how I disagreed with their treatment of Gina Carano. Maybe I'm on the "Bad Boy" list.

    Leave a comment:


  • Starcade
    replied
    I have not received the survey but I did get one back in like March maybe? I remember the questions were not about if I needed a AP to visit but with my AP what features were the most important and more importantly it seems which features were the least. ( i.e. what can they cut)

    Regarding the VQ issues... most AP'ers have grown accustomed to not being too concerned if they miss the VQ lottery as they know they will likely be returning soon on another day. ( We tried twice before COVID to get in to RotR and never did but where not too worried as we expected to return sooner than we thought) This same feeling happens when an AP'er visits the park to find their favorite attractions closed for refurb. "No biggie we'll catch it next time" The tourists that visit though, I feel for them missing out as their window is a fraction of what AP'ers have and if they miss something they likely have missed it for years or forever if they only get to take one trip in their lifetime.

    Also those saying we are about to see a wave of out of state and foreign visitors etc. I think this wave is smaller than we think, many of them are already going to WDW. If your going to be on plane for hours anyway WDW seems on paper to be a much better multi-day destination with more to do with more then twice as many parks and many more hotel options. Now you put in the price which by many accounts is far cheaper all around from food to lodging than I think all the tourists have already been flocking to WDW. I think chapek sees the data and he sees how the WDW ratio of domestic to foreign guests is smaller then under normal circumstances which tells him WDW is already cannibalizing from DLR when it comes to tourists. I think they also see July is still almost completely available even though June is almost booked up for single day DL. This may be the cliff they were looking for to re-introduce AP's and hence why the survey went out.

    I have been saying all along they are milking the desperation of FOMO customers to return as long as they can, it's their line they are trying to hold. I have also said they are likely holding it to end of summer as they will milk summer for what it's worth. This survey is perfect timing for them to announce the new AP by September.

    Also by September they can get their staffing under control which I have been hearing has been problematic. This is one of the key issues why they are limiting guests throughout the resort more so than the CA regulations.
    Last edited by Starcade; 06-09-2021, 11:37 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • linkeq2001
    replied
    Originally posted by J. Thaddeus Toad View Post

    An immensely popular ride ……. you may or may not get to experience if you buy a ticket to the park.

    Want to talk about upsells ? A friend was telling me about his coworker who flew him and his little son, both huge SW fans (they dress in wardrobe), out of Seattle to visit GE, only to discover the lottery to ride Rise, which of course they didn’t win. He asked if there was any way they could ride, and Town Hall told him to buy another ticket on another day.

    An E ticket that is not open to all paying customers is not successful…. It’s bad design and/or operations, and it’s ridiculous. May not be a big deal to locals / AP, but to travelers and families with limited budgets, it is.

    I have a lot of problems with GE, but this bugs me the most - the fact not every kid can go on the latest and greatest ride. That ain’t what Disneyland is about.
    I think this is actually a pretty profound thought and it’s one that didn’t cross my mind until you said it. Thinking ahead we are planning a trip for Summer 2022 (our Christmas 2020 was cancelled and I want to push it as far out from current restrictions and pandemic situation as possible), my little guy will be prime age and excitement for both Spider-Man and Rise. It may be far enough ahead that the excitement has died down and the lottery is gone but if we don’t win that lottery on the days we are there he will be absolutely devastated (me too). In fact I could see it being something that ruins the whole trip and Disneyland for him.

    We will likely be there for three or four days but the chance to miss out still exists. I know one thing, if we did it would make me think long and hard about a return trip knowing that the latest and greatest may not be something I get to experience. I waited four hours for the new HP ride in Diagon alley two days after it’s opening; wish Disney would at least give me that option. The cynic in me says they won’t in part because I’m not out and about spending money in the park for those four hours

    Leave a comment:


  • J. Thaddeus Toad
    replied
    Originally posted by linkeq2001 View Post
    Though can we continue to call SWGE a failure now that the immensely popular Resistance ride is open?
    An immensely popular ride ……. you may or may not get to experience if you buy a ticket to the park.

    Want to talk about upsells ? A friend was telling me about his coworker who flew him and his little son, both huge SW fans (they dress in wardrobe), out of Seattle to visit GE, only to discover the lottery to ride Rise, which of course they didn’t win. He asked if there was any way they could ride, and Town Hall told him to buy another ticket on another day.

    An E ticket that is not open to all paying customers is not successful…. It’s bad design and/or operations, and it’s ridiculous. May not be a big deal to locals / AP, but to travelers and families with limited budgets, it is.

    I have a lot of problems with GE, but this bugs me the most - the fact not every kid can go on the latest and greatest ride. That ain’t what Disneyland is about.
    Last edited by J. Thaddeus Toad; 06-09-2021, 12:00 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • md6379a
    replied
    Originally posted by linkeq2001 View Post
    ...can we continue to call SWGE a failure now that the immensely popular Resistance ride is open? The land has some big issues and likely isn’t helped by the time period it’s set in but the response hasn’t been as tepid since the ride opened.
    The response to SWGE without and with RotR accidentally illustrated a profoundly important point: it's not the IP (at least not alone), it's the quality of the experience that really matters.

    I hope this was taken as a lesson...

    Leave a comment:


  • linkeq2001
    replied
    Originally posted by WaltDisney'sAlec View Post

    I think you're right about SWGE. Once Rise opened, the land has certainly been filled out more. It's not so much a failure as much as it is just brimming with unrealized potential (remember Chapek's Star Wars dinner party announcement?)

    The key difference here is that Disney isn't even 6 months away from opening their Avengers E-ticket. They haven't started clearing the expansion area for it, let alone announced anything concrete beyond their years-ago presentation. It took years to build Rise once they cleared the RoA section. It's taking them years to build Cosmic Rewind and Tron. If not for the characters and shows this land would be DOA without its E-ticket.



    I think the purpose is this survey is to figure out why legacy APs aren't buying up regular tickets more than once or twice. You're right that money isn't the problem, but here I think attendance is. DCA just opened it's first new land in almost a decade based on Disney's most successful franchise, and yet Disneyland is the park with full reservations in early July. Interest just isn't there, especially when you compare it to when Cars Land opened in 2012 and non-AP parkhoppers would choose to start their day at DCA over Disneyland. When Disney tries to squeeze every last dollar out of guests, we notice. We won't spend money on $100 sandwiches or pay-to-win ride upgrades unless we're getting our money's worth. From the looks of things, that's just not happening with Avengers Campus.

    This isn't a dig at you or anyone else on Micechat, but I think the preference for revenues over attendance is a bad business decision. Guest experience matters and overcrowding is a real issue, but that preference only works if you can make up the difference with per capita spending. Has that strategy worked? Judging by quarterly earnings calls, it hasn't for the domestic parks. Revenue was down and just about everything fell short of expectations that were already low because of COVID. The only reason EPS was positive is because Disney furloughed everyone and hadn't accounted for all the DLR CMs it brought back.

    The more guests get shortchanged, either with new lands or with giving us half the usual portion of the Monte Cristo for the same price, the more attendance will suffer long-term if we don't get our money's worth. There aren't any construction projects for SoCal other than the Runaway Railway clone, and that is not a good long-term strategy. Disney finally learned last year that Wall Street cares more about gaining Disney+ subscribers than huge box office revenues. Now it seems like they're waiting to learn the same lesson for the theme parks. Only here, Disney just canceled all the subscribers and then asked them how they felt about it after the fact. I guarantee that AP spending at WDW is just as inconsistent as DLR was, but there just aren't as many of them back east. And where have the old APs gone instead? Knott's, Universal, and Six Flags, which don't offer the Disney product but do offer a good experience and value for their guests.
    All true but keep in mind we are judging all of
    this with out of state tourism and international tourism effectively shut down. What do the parks look like with Canadians and Australians, two groups that make up a substantial portion of day tickets. Add in guests from out of state as well and you have a large number of potential clients that are not really able or reticent to come at the moment. Worrying about numbers now is like wondering why your restaurant isn’t making money when it’s open everyday but Friday and Saturday night. This is why part of me thinks they may hold off on a new AP program for the time being, it’s impossible to interpret the impact under normal market conditions right now. The fact that both parks are pretty busy even this long after the initial open under what are still very limited conditions is somewhat impressive.

    I totally agree with you about the Disney+ versus box office thing, steady month on month income is much better for a company than sporadic and less reliable spikes(though it makes knowing what a successful film versus an unsuccessful is very challenging). I respectfully don’t think the analogy quite works when you compare “subscribers” to a physical space like DLR though. Streaming takes nothing away from anyone’s experience and costs very little. Someone can have a sub and stream non stop and someone can have one and not stream at all and it costs the company a negligible difference. A. users actions also have no impact whatsoever on someone else. A membership to a theme park or zoo. Etc though means that person is taking physical space and requires staffing to handle their existence, there’s a much more immediate and substantial cost to the company tied to the actual use of the product. A number of “super users” also more directly negatively impacts other users, especially when the company has little control over when those subscribers choose to use the product.

    I’d argue there’s a much finer balance that needs to be taken into account with a subscription here and that’s likely what Disney is playing around with trying to find. Remember at these prices Disney is betting on a former SoCal AP only going roughly twice a year and a Deluxe four times a year to equal their previous ticket price....those seem like pretty good odds to me considering that no matter what Disney fans tend to keep coming back. I mean they could easily be wrong and this could be the straw that breaks the Disney fan camel’s back and we could see the AP program come back in a similar vein.....but four times a year to the park isn’t that much....
    Last edited by linkeq2001; 06-08-2021, 09:44 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagleman
    replied
    I would not put grain of salt , into Disney Survey's...........

    Disney use them only ,get a concept , how to make Money from the
    THE Consumer".........
    IMO it more of a PR spin !

    Leave a comment:


  • AhpalovestheDuck
    replied
    Bottom line, no AP, no Disneyland visit. There was a time with the kids when we would open the park and leave when kicked out. Now as I approach 80 years old, 16 hour days in the park is not going to happen. We now spread those 16 hours over a few days. Without an AP, those daily costs put things out of reach.

    Leave a comment:


  • WaltDisney'sAlec
    replied
    Originally posted by linkeq2001 View Post

    Likely the course of action. They need someone to fill in the tepid responses to franchise lands done on the (relative) cheap. Though can we continue to call SWGE a failure now that the immensely popular Resistance ride is open? The land has some big issues and likely isn’t helped by the time period it’s set in but the response hasn’t been as tepid since the ride opened.

    I think the AP program will be back.....I just continue to bet on it being tied to reservations in some way. The ability to control and know crowds will likely
    just be too tempting for Disney management to pass up. It would also be a relativity solid PR move as management could say “hey we cut out the random drop ins on Friday nights to limit crowding”, which likely doesn’t bring in additional dollars in merchandise/food anyways.

    Might be wrong, who knows. Disney is famous for doubling down HARD on things once they have set a course.
    I think you're right about SWGE. Once Rise opened, the land has certainly been filled out more. It's not so much a failure as much as it is just brimming with unrealized potential (remember Chapek's Star Wars dinner party announcement?)

    The key difference here is that Disney isn't even 6 months away from opening their Avengers E-ticket. They haven't started clearing the expansion area for it, let alone announced anything concrete beyond their years-ago presentation. It took years to build Rise once they cleared the RoA section. It's taking them years to build Cosmic Rewind and Tron. If not for the characters and shows this land would be DOA without its E-ticket.

    Originally posted by SuperHappyCM View Post

    Money isn’t the problem. From the micechat staff...

    Park Capacity Unrestricted – Disneyland will be able to set the park capacity at whatever they want. However, Disneyland has committed to keeping park reservations for the foreseeable future. That’s VERY good news for guests as it prevents severe overcrowding. Expect capacity to slowly increase until the parks start to feel the pinch (don’t worry, you’ll hear me complaining). Then we’ll likely see Disney begin to play around with efficiency so they can start adding even more capacity here and there. But we don’t expect to see shoulder to shoulder conditions again for a very long time, if ever. The current park President, Ken Potrock, has prioritized guest experience and that means not setting the daily crowd limit to the insane levels of 2019 and before. Don’t worry about Disney’s profit margin either, with guests now gladly paying $154/day for a ticket, Disneyland is now making more money per guest than they ever have. Once capacity increases, this should be a very lucrative 2nd half of the year for Disneyland, perhaps their best ever.

    From the CEO…

    Chapek stated that the per guest spending across the Disneyland Resort Annual Passholders was inconsistent, and the new program aimed to “get an adequate return to our shareholders for the type of experience that we do give to our guests”.
    Essentially, Chapek and the company feel that the old program was offering too much at an inadequate price point, and also that spending at times was not strong enough amongst Annual Passholders.
    This would indicate that the new programs will have members paying more money for less days of access (and maybe even lesser benefits).

    Not my words…theirs. So the question is, what's the real purpose of this survey?
    I think the purpose is this survey is to figure out why legacy APs aren't buying up regular tickets more than once or twice. You're right that money isn't the problem, but here I think attendance is. DCA just opened it's first new land in almost a decade based on Disney's most successful franchise, and yet Disneyland is the park with full reservations in early July. Interest just isn't there, especially when you compare it to when Cars Land opened in 2012 and non-AP parkhoppers would choose to start their day at DCA over Disneyland. When Disney tries to squeeze every last dollar out of guests, we notice. We won't spend money on $100 sandwiches or pay-to-win ride upgrades unless we're getting our money's worth. From the looks of things, that's just not happening with Avengers Campus.

    This isn't a dig at you or anyone else on Micechat, but I think the preference for revenues over attendance is a bad business decision. Guest experience matters and overcrowding is a real issue, but that preference only works if you can make up the difference with per capita spending. Has that strategy worked? Judging by quarterly earnings calls, it hasn't for the domestic parks. Revenue was down and just about everything fell short of expectations that were already low because of COVID. The only reason EPS was positive is because Disney furloughed everyone and hadn't accounted for all the DLR CMs it brought back.

    The more guests get shortchanged, either with new lands or with giving us half the usual portion of the Monte Cristo for the same price, the more attendance will suffer long-term if we don't get our money's worth. There aren't any construction projects for SoCal other than the Runaway Railway clone, and that is not a good long-term strategy. Disney finally learned last year that Wall Street cares more about gaining Disney+ subscribers than huge box office revenues. Now it seems like they're waiting to learn the same lesson for the theme parks. Only here, Disney just canceled all the subscribers and then asked them how they felt about it after the fact. I guarantee that AP spending at WDW is just as inconsistent as DLR was, but there just aren't as many of them back east. And where have the old APs gone instead? Knott's, Universal, and Six Flags, which don't offer the Disney product but do offer a good experience and value for their guests.
    Last edited by WaltDisney'sAlec; 06-08-2021, 12:21 PM.

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  • YeaDZNY
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

    Gee, I can't imagine why. Disney has spent years aggressively selling Annual Passports. They have made uncounted PR utterances declaring their love for APers. They have enticed APers with discounts on food and merchandise. And then suddenly, on the heels of a year-long pandemic, the CEO announces Disney is canceling the program because APers don't spend enough money at the Parks.

    Adding to the insult, they send out an AP survey that may as well have said, "Dear Unvalued Ex-APer: Since it's your fault the AP program was canceled, would you mind participating in a marketing survey to help us figure out how to make you spend more at Disney Parks® in the future?"
    LMAO!!! exactly!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain Andy
    replied
    I got mine today. Hilariously, it was sitting in my spam. I'm telling ya, it's like an ex calling the old home phone asking me how I'm doing....

    Just fine, thank you!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by YeaDZNY View Post
    Yea got one about 2 weeks ago after our most recent visit to the parks and staying at DCA. I replied back and said "go %#$&% yourself" :-)
    Gee, I can't imagine why. Disney has spent years aggressively selling Annual Passports. They have made uncounted PR utterances declaring their love for APers. They have enticed APers with discounts on food and merchandise. And then suddenly, on the heels of a year-long pandemic, the CEO announces Disney is canceling the program because APers don't spend enough money at the Parks.

    Adding to the insult, they send out an AP survey that may as well have said, "Dear Unvalued Ex-APer: Since it's your fault the AP program was canceled, would you mind participating in a marketing survey to help us figure out how to make you spend more at Disney Parks® in the future?"

    Leave a comment:


  • linkeq2001
    replied
    Originally posted by Stormy View Post

    Bwah-ha-ha, that sounds like the equivalent of "Darling, does my bum look big in these jeans?". Disney better be ready for some honest answers that they aren't going to like.
    They quite frankly won't care. If the sentiment from many former APs is negative but the park and profit margins are ahead of what was expected with day passes and tourists then they will forge ahead. I know there are calls for an earlier return to AP but I think they may hold out until at least the end of summer, they have yet to test the non-AP waters with out of state and out of country tourists. The border is stilled closed with Canada and lots of people up here are ready to travel again, there MAY be a huge surge as people spend savings and travel after being cooped up for a year. Bringing back the AP program early would probably be pretty short sighted when you potentially have pent up demand from outside the area as well, it will be a gamble but one Chapek may be willing to make.

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