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  • Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

    Hi Everyone,

    I'm a big fan of the site, frequent reader and finally just joined today, and I am excited to make my first post, I think and hope it's a good one...Anyway, my post is both a question and hopefully a good chat topic that many of you will enjoy reading and commenting on.

    My question is in regard to the "Ticket Values" that are assigned to rides and attractions at Disney Parks. From my reading, I've noticed that in many articles, and often in Micechats and other Disney blogs, people frequently define ride quality with their old style ticket values, i.e. a major attraction=E-Ticket.

    My question is this, how are those values defined today? How does an attraction built after the era of individual ride tickets get a "Ticket Value"? Does Disney and imagineering decide an attraction will be a certain ticket level during the budgeting and design process? Is this just a way to give reference to the quality of an attraction for us fans who are interested or does Disney still use these definitions in-house for planning the budgets and scope of attractions? Are these values today just assigned by the opinions of outsiders and therefore extremely debatable?

    Also, I'm interested to know your opinions on a few other related issues: Do old rides decline in ticket value? Might an E-ticket 30 years ago be only a D or C today? What characteristics define each level for you? What makes an E-Ticket or what makes it a C?

    Also, I would love to see a list of ticket values of current and upcoming attractions of DL and DCA so if anyone has one or feels like contributing one that would be great! (Hopefully and likely there will be some disagreement on this which will spawn further debate.) Also, if anyone can produce a copy of the last list of ticket values from before the individual ride tickets were eliminated that would be really interesting. (And no I haven't looked on Yesterland for this, so if it's there, I apologize for my laziness and would love for someone to provide a link.)

    Anyway, since this is my first post I thought I'd say a little about myself, sorry this is so long, but you don't have to read this is you're not interested. My name is Alan and I'm a 32 year old Project Manager for an Architectural firm in San Pedro, Ca and a Cal Poly, SLO Architecture grad, and like a few others of you, a lifelong wannabe Imagineer. (My Senior Thesis was in theme park design with a focus on business in the contsruction industry.)

    I have been a frequent visitor of DL since I can remember (Early 80's) and come from a family with a long love of Disney. My grandparents have a wonderful picture of my Mom and her syblings standing with Walt in front of the Castle from around 1958 so we've got quite a tradition of love for the Magic Kingdom.
    The Mickey audience is not made up of people; it has no racial, national, political, religious or social differences or affiliations; the Mickey audience is made up of parts of people, of that deathless, precious, ageless, absolutely primitive remnant of something in every world-wracked human being which makes us play with children’s toys and laugh without self-consciousness at silly things, and sing in bathtubs, and dream and believe that our babies are uniquely beautiful. You know…the Mickey in us.
    -Walt Disney

  • #2
    Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

    Great first post Bob! It seems now-a-days just fans like to refer to rides by their "ticket value". Disney itself likes their NEW rides to be refered to as E Ticket just becuase that has become synonmous with the best rides available.

    Old rides would have to change their ticket values IMO. If the Monorail were still an E-ticket it would be empty. On the other hand, POTC & HM have withstood the test of time and would still be E Ticket rides. Quite often chat boards like to talk about creating only top notch rides, but as many know, Disneyland is about all tickets rides. This includes the Omni Bus & Lincoln Show, the Fantasyland "C Ticket" dark rides, all the way to E-tickets like Indy and Space mountain.

    Welcome to MiceChat!

    Chad

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    • #3
      Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

      When the old ticket system was in place some rides did indeed go down in value. I can not off the top of my head remember which ones, or if it occurred when the E ticket was introduced. Great post.
      Originally posted by SummerInFL
      Jesus, even I wouldn't eat that.

      Originally posted by Wanda Woman
      Turtle, the dorks are going to take upskirt robot pics.

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      • #4
        Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

        Welcom to Micechat!

        There is a replica of the full ticket book in the new DVD about Disneyland. It doesn't list the year but it shows all the attractions for each level of ticket.

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        • #5
          Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

          I think there is a general agreement/disagreement about attractions built post-ticket-book.
          The attractions are compared with the various existing attractions and their last-known ticket rating, and then people make their opinions, then we argue.

          Yes, in the ticket-book era, attractions were "downgraded" over the years, as they fell out of favor.

          Poster = Opus1Guy seems to be filled with this knowledge and other, um, stuff. He's real old, but still sharp.

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          • #6
            Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

            I concur with aashee--many rides can lose ticket value over time, but some prove their timelessness by remaining relevant and enjoyable decades after their construction. Pirates and HM were the examples I had in mind, too. Autopia an E-ticket now? No way.

            I don't think there's any official designations made by Disney these days. It's usually pretty obvious when a real new E-ticket comes into play, but the distinction between the lower tickets is pretty hard to pick up on unless it's officially designated. Indy is generally accepted as the most recent E-ticket to be added to Disneyland. More recent additions--BLAB, Pooh, etc.--may be well-enjoyed by some guests, but you'd be hard-pressed to find too many people who really understand the ticket system who would call those E-tickets. Nemo's a little harder to classify. It certainly has some of the longest lines in the park for the time being, and that might have given it a temporary E-ticket status in the days of old. But it really doesn't merit long-term designation as more than a D-ticket, I don't think.

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            • #7
              Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

              First off, welcome to MiceChat. And GREAT first post!!!!

              Regarding the "Ticket" rating system, for me it's just the way I've heard of the "Best of the best" attractions being referred to.

              As for attractions that have fallen, I'd have to say Star Tours. It was definately an "E-ticket" quality attraction when it first opened and I'd say it's proabably a D-Ticket right now.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

                Originally posted by Datameister View Post
                I concur with aashee--many rides can lose ticket value over time, but some prove their timelessness by remaining relevant and enjoyable decades after their construction. Pirates and HM were the examples I had in mind, too. Autopia an E-ticket now? No way.
                That's funny. I bet when Disney reopened Autopia they peddled it as an E Ticket ride. That ticket would have tumbled faster than So Cal home prices.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

                  Originally posted by aashee View Post
                  That's funny. I bet when Disney reopened Autopia they peddled it as an E Ticket ride. That ticket would have tumbled faster than So Cal home prices.
                  I'd have to rate Autopia a C ticket about now. The cars are slower, sure the scenery is nice, but man, its just...i dont know the word

                  "The moose say's you're closed, i say you're open" Clark W. Griswold

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

                    Originally posted by BroncoBob View Post
                    I'd have to rate Autopia a C ticket about now. The cars are slower, sure the scenery is nice, but man, its just...i dont know the word
                    Is Zzzzzz a word?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

                      Could be. Yawn would be a good one too...

                      I knew someone would help

                      "The moose say's you're closed, i say you're open" Clark W. Griswold

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                      • #12
                        Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

                        I never even cared for Autopia as a kid...My sister would make us ride it...
                        The Mickey audience is not made up of people; it has no racial, national, political, religious or social differences or affiliations; the Mickey audience is made up of parts of people, of that deathless, precious, ageless, absolutely primitive remnant of something in every world-wracked human being which makes us play with children’s toys and laugh without self-consciousness at silly things, and sing in bathtubs, and dream and believe that our babies are uniquely beautiful. You know…the Mickey in us.
                        -Walt Disney

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

                          So I did a little more research myself, below is a list of the rides and tickets in 1972 (from Yesterland website) and yes, Disney themselves downgraded ticket values over time themselves, as some of you noted and which would be expected. Check out Yesterland for a few other interesting facts.

                          From the Disneyland Guide, Summer 1972:
                          • Main Street Horse Cars (Main Street)
                          • Horseless Carriage (Main Street)
                          • Omnibus (Main Street)
                          • Fire Engine (Main Street)
                          • King Arthur Carousel (Fantasyland)
                          • Sleeping Beauty Castle (Fantasyland)
                          • Fantasyland Theater (Fantasyland)
                          • Mad Tea Party (Fantasyland)
                          • Autopias (Fantasyland, Tomorrowland)
                          • Shooting Galleries (Fronierland, Adventureland)
                          • Peter Pan Flight (Fantasyland)
                          • Dumbo Flying Elephants (Fantasyland)
                          • Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride (Fantasyland)
                          • Snow White’s Adventures (Fantasyland)
                          • Mike Fink Keel Boats (Frontierland)
                          • Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln (Main Street)
                          • Rocket Jets (Tomorrowland)
                          • PeopleMover presented by Goodyear (Tomorrowland)
                          • Flight to the Moon presented by McDonnell Douglas (Tomorrowland)
                          • Storybookland Canal Boats (Fantasyland)
                          • Skyway (Tomorrowland, Fantasyland)
                          • Tom Sawyer Island Rafts (Frontierland)
                          • Davy Crockett’s Explorer Canoes (Bear Country)
                          • Santa Fe & Disneyland Railroad (Main Street, New Orleans Square and Tomorrowland)
                          • Columbia Sailing Ship (Frontierland)
                          • Mark Twain Steamboat (Frontierland)
                          Free Shows and Exhibits
                          The Mickey audience is not made up of people; it has no racial, national, political, religious or social differences or affiliations; the Mickey audience is made up of parts of people, of that deathless, precious, ageless, absolutely primitive remnant of something in every world-wracked human being which makes us play with children’s toys and laugh without self-consciousness at silly things, and sing in bathtubs, and dream and believe that our babies are uniquely beautiful. You know…the Mickey in us.
                          -Walt Disney

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

                            Originally posted by sediment View Post
                            Poster = Opus1Guy seems to be filled with this knowledge and other, um, stuff. He's real old, but still sharp.
                            Eh? What's that sonny? Hold on while I look for my reading spectacles, plug in my hearing aid, and put in my wooden teeth.



                            Originally posted by sediment View Post
                            I think there is a general agreement/disagreement about attractions built post-ticket-book.

                            The attractions are compared with the various existing attractions and their last-known ticket rating, and then people make their opinions, then we argue.

                            Yes, in the ticket-book era, attractions were "downgraded" over the years, as they fell out of favor.
                            Agree, and true.

                            I don't think many at Disney use old-style ticket values in rating their attractions anymore...except for the "E Ticket" designation which they still use often in their hyping of some new or classic top-line attraction. You might hear them say something like, "It's a real E ticket"...but you'll never hear them say, "It's a real D ticket."

                            In the ticket book days, attractions sometimes got a boost in rating simply by being new...rather than by their cost or other factor. And then sometime later they often dropped down in rating. Assigned ticket values were sometimes rather arbitrary. Other times they were directly associated with a goal of paying off its costs (initial and continuing), as sometimes such things were directly tied to the number of redeemed tickets the attraction "earned" during operation. This was especially true of Retlaw attractions, such as the Disneyland Railroad, Monorail, and Main Street vehicles...which at one point were operated by Retlaw under lease with Disneyland. Enchanted Tiki Room was another odd-ball that operated initially independent of the A-E ticket system, and enjoying that attraction required you to purchase a separate ticket that was priced even more than an E Ticket (often referred to internally as the "F Ticket").

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Defining Ride & Attraction Quality by Tickets?

                              Great list Bob. I'm a bit confused as to why Alice was a B ticket yet all the other fantasyland dark rides were C. Alice is my favorite of the bunch.

                              Comment

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