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  • #31
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    Originally posted by BellhopPrincess View Post
    My first degree is going to be in technical theater as more of a backup plan, but I think it will help aid me in my goal, especially with lighting and set design. I'm thinking about a second degree in engineering of some sort (probably at a trade school--I learn by watching and by doing and a classroom isn't going to be the spot for me) to help develop the other skills I'll need as a basis for the job.
    Many years ago, the technical theater program at CalArts had a theme park design class taught by an Imagineer. In perusing the school's website, I don't see anything like that being offered now, but I think your plan to study technical theater is a great idea. Note: at one time, CalArts was a well-known pipeline into Disney--mainly because of the animation program within the Film/Video school. I have no idea if that's still the case, but it may be worth checking out.

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    • #32
      Re: How to Become an Imagineer

      Lazyboy-

      That sucks that your classmates cheat, but take heed in that they are really only hurting themselves. It's good that your school has that policy, though, it's one I think more schools should go back to.
      The Mickey audience is not made up of people; it has no racial, national, political, religious or social differences or affiliations; the Mickey audience is made up of parts of people, of that deathless, precious, ageless, absolutely primitive remnant of something in every world-wracked human being which makes us play with children’s toys and laugh without self-consciousness at silly things, and sing in bathtubs, and dream and believe that our babies are uniquely beautiful. You know…the Mickey in us.
      -Walt Disney

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      • #33
        Re: How to Become an Imagineer

        Look into California Institute of the Arts. I am a lighting design student there. The school was built by Walt and the school still has a lot of connections. I am still aiming to work for Disney at one point of my career.
        Matt

        http://www.youtube.com/user/Rockstarlighting
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/ld86/

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        • #34
          Re: How to Become an Imagineer

          Originally posted by Datameister View Post
          That being said...if I were at SLO, I definitely wouldn't have gotten a chance to ride Soarin' before the attraction opened for the day and participate in a rousing UCLA Eight-Clap as we "flew" over Los Angeles.
          YES! We may have only had four people join in, but hopefully we started a tradition.
          "You tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try." ~ Homer Simpson

          Avatar designed by Greg Maletic

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          • #35
            Re: How to Become an Imagineer

            Here's an interview with one of the best:

            http://www.themedattraction.com/sotto.htm

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            • #36
              Re: How to Become an Imagineer

              sorry if I offended you with that
              Not at all!

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              • #37
                Re: How to Become an Imagineer

                Originally posted by BellhopPrincess View Post
                I don't like the idea of college because I started faltering in "the plan" early in HS and everyone pushed me so hard to fix it so I could get into college, like it was the most important thing in the universe. I feel that there is more to being successful than just having a degree so you can get paid better. That's my gripe with college. I know to get to where I want I need to work, to learn, and to just go all out. I can do it, I just hate having to.
                A college degree isn't just about making more money (heck, at times the couple that I have feel like just the opposite), it shows the people you want to work for that you were able to stick to a plan, and complete it. It ALSO means you generally have a broader knowledge base to draw from because of general education classes, etc.

                When I was first going to college, I was feeling the same way that you described, I was DONE with it and wanted to drop out. I went to my boss and teacher (who taught the Stage Craft Classes) for some advice, he said, if you look at 95% of the people working in the entertainment industry in positions that make any type of decisions; producers, directors, most of the heads of departments... they all have degrees of some type, not just film degrees, but degrees in business, physics, marketing, history, anything.

                Don't think of college as something you HAVE to do to make it to your goal (even if it is), think of it as something you may have the distinct priveledge of GETTING to do. Not only will college offer you the opportunities to take on creative challenges and succeed, or even fail and learn from those failures, it will put you in a near daily contact with other great minds and creative people who you can learn from and gain inspiration.

                Lots of folks on here have already suggested some specific schools and programs that can help you along your path, but I wanted to encourage you to re-examine what college means to you, try to see it not as chore, but as opportunity.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: How to Become an Imagineer

                  ^Well said Pirate Lover
                  The Mickey audience is not made up of people; it has no racial, national, political, religious or social differences or affiliations; the Mickey audience is made up of parts of people, of that deathless, precious, ageless, absolutely primitive remnant of something in every world-wracked human being which makes us play with children’s toys and laugh without self-consciousness at silly things, and sing in bathtubs, and dream and believe that our babies are uniquely beautiful. You know…the Mickey in us.
                  -Walt Disney

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

                    Kudos Pirate Lover, much better said then I was trying to say. I agree 100% with you and encourage Bell Hop Princess to realize that College is completely different from HS, after all everyone at college wants to be there to accomplish their goals, in HS it is sometimes like a prison sentence, people are just taking up space. The secret to a great college experience is to figure out just what you want to do with your life and then go to a school that specializes in that major, it will make all the difference.

                    Meanwhile, back at the ranch, I sincerely hope there is an imagineer who can help out with this project she has, as spending the day with a working imagineer will help her decide if she is up to the challenge. Also note in this thread someone gave advice of other firms using imagineers then just Disney.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: How to Become an Imagineer

                      Originally posted by Kath2188 View Post
                      The secret to a great college experience is to figure out just what you want to do with your life and then go to a school that specializes in that major.
                      Sheesh...And all this time I thought the secret to a great college experience were the 50 cent well drinks...

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: How to Become an Imagineer

                        One of my oldest friend is a Disney Imagineer - she went to Pepperdine Univ - got her masters in art and now working on her theologian masters- she designs album/CD covers won an award for her Bob Dylan interactive album projetc- she got a job at Sony first, then to Disney, then back to Sony, now back at Disney and now at Nickelodeon

                        She is quite the artist - and I knew that when she was in 3rd grade - but then all the kids in her family are either artists or sculpters

                        Okay just looked at my friends resume - she worked on Meet the Robinsons, Atlantis, March of the Pengiuns, Polar Express and other projects - she was a featured Artist for Pixart

                        She's at Nickoldeon now

                        AND the kicker, and I didn't know this - she won an Academy Award in 2002 for her work on Chubb Chubbs - an animated short for Sony
                        Last edited by Trac; 03-25-2008, 01:57 PM.
                        Spell Binding Books
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                        • #42
                          Re: How to Become an Imagineer

                          That is just so exciting about your friend, she is really living the dream, and the cherry on top was the accademy award!
                          Fabulous reaffirmation!

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: How to Become an Imagineer

                            Originally posted by Pirate Lover 68 View Post
                            A college degree isn't just about making more money (heck, at times the couple that I have feel like just the opposite), it shows the people you want to work for that you were able to stick to a plan, and complete it. It ALSO means you generally have a broader knowledge base to draw from because of general education classes, etc.

                            When I was first going to college, I was feeling the same way that you described, I was DONE with it and wanted to drop out. I went to my boss and teacher (who taught the Stage Craft Classes) for some advice, he said, if you look at 95% of the people working in the entertainment industry in positions that make any type of decisions; producers, directors, most of the heads of departments... they all have degrees of some type, not just film degrees, but degrees in business, physics, marketing, history, anything.

                            Don't think of college as something you HAVE to do to make it to your goal (even if it is), think of it as something you may have the distinct priveledge of GETTING to do. Not only will college offer you the opportunities to take on creative challenges and succeed, or even fail and learn from those failures, it will put you in a near daily contact with other great minds and creative people who you can learn from and gain inspiration.

                            Lots of folks on here have already suggested some specific schools and programs that can help you along your path, but I wanted to encourage you to re-examine what college means to you, try to see it not as chore, but as opportunity.
                            It was more the fact that I was pushed into it that turned me off to it. I am unfortunate enough to be taken for 25 years old every time I open my mouth (which is good for me in dealing with people who are older since it looks like I always know what I'm taking about) but it's difficult when I have teachers who don't know what to do with me because I can correct them. I can write an A+ college level essay with no rewrites for my english or history classes if prompted. In any class, when there is a "game" to review the material so far, people have fought over me to be on their team just because I'm "smart" and I'll therefore do all the hard stuff for them. I've been turned off on education because of my experiences thus far, with being used, with being not being challenged to the point of not trying anymore because I feel like it's a waste of my time.
                            I understand what you're saying, and I know college will probably be a lot more of what I want and need than any of my other education has been in the past four years. I think I've just hit a point where I'm not learning anything new, I'm just being refreshed on things I learned years ago. I want to actually learn, not just show what I already know. Another part of my not wanting to go to college is a fear that what I've experienced so far is just going to continue.
                            Originally posted by Steve DeGaetano View Post
                            Sheesh...And all this time I thought the secret to a great college experience were the 50 cent well drinks...
                            Yeah, that'll be good too
                            I mean....no....drinking is bad.....
                            dreams. come. true.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: How to Become an Imagineer

                              So I am in the LA area and I'm looking at colleges (I am currently a junior). I also hope, along with many others here, to become an imagineer. I am going to look at UCLA thursday and I'm going to find out some more info on that imagineering class.

                              Another interesting little bit that I heard from a cast member that I was talking to today in the park was that imagineering doesn't like hiring people who have previously worked for Disney or in a Disney park. He said his friends are doing internships at the park and were told this. Apparently they want fresh ideas coming from someone that is not coming out of the parks. Does anyone know if this is true? Because I wanted to go to school down here and work at the park while I went to college so that way I got my foot in the door with Disney.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Re: How to Become an Imagineer

                                Originally posted by BellhopPrincess View Post
                                I think I've just hit a point where I'm not learning anything new, I'm just being refreshed on things I learned years ago. I want to actually learn, not just show what I already know. Another part of my not wanting to go to college is a fear that what I've experienced so far is just going to continue.
                                I would imagine that WAS a frustrating experience, and I can tell you that to have a different experience in college, you will have to find courses that challenge you, and keep pressing your own envelope. You are ultimately in charge of the experience you have. Instructors and other classmates are going to have an impact, but how you react to them is what is going to really color your experience.

                                I enjoyed high school, but I absolutely LOVED going to college, because I knew it was all up to me. I was there by CHOICE. I took the classes I wanted to take. I shaped my education from start to finish. I dropped a fair number of classes that I felt weren't giving me the experience I wanted, but more often than not, I was eager to see what the day would bring me, and I was annoyed by students that whined about the work they had to do in class. I thought, "fine, go get a job instead, let ME learn in blissful peace."

                                It sounds like you are really bright, and it also sounds like your biggest challenge to making college work and getting where you want to go, is working on YOU. You need to know how to get satisfaction from your education. It's harder to do in High school, because you get signed up for certain classes that you just can't get around. In college, you'll be able to seek out instructors that teach courses that will be of interest to you. Take a completely active role in choosing your college, choosing your courses, and choosing the instructors you want to teach you those courses, and you will go a long way towards having the experience you want to have.

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