Announcement

Collapse

MiceChat Rules

A list of MiceChat's rules can be found at the top of the Disneyland forum.
See more
See less

How to Become an Imagineer

Collapse

Header Ad

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • CaitlinMcFly
    started a topic How to Become an Imagineer

    How to Become an Imagineer

    I offer no answers, hence why I'm asking!
    I have been very up in the air with what I want to do with my life, and in english class we have to do a job shadowing project where we find someone in out field of choice to "shadow" for six hours of a day to find out about the job. Now this is a difficult thing to do if you don't know what you want to do with your life, so I just chose Imagineering more as a joke until I figured out what I was really going to do.
    Until it hit me: Why can't I be an Imagineer? I'm creative. I'm artistic. I'm logical and I like problem solving. I'm not fantastic at math but I find science and engineering very interesting. All of a sudden, I knew what my perfect fit in life was going to be as a career!
    Now, I face a huge dilemma with how exactly I go about doing this with my life. I know I need to go to college next year (which seems like a given but I had actually decided it wasn't for me) and I think I'm going to go for a few degrees, the first being technical theater and the second being engineering or design of some kind.
    I'm planning on calling WDI when I get home today to ask myself, but if I can skip having to deal with receptionists and people who can't help me, that would be great! Does anyone have any tips for me? Does anyone know any Imagineers I can get in contact with for my job shadow or to just talk with? Thanks, guys!

  • Datameister
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    Tony Baxter was a Submarine Captain
    Are you sure about that? I knew he worked as an ice cream scooper on Main Street and in front of Pirates, but I didn't know about anything beyond that.

    Leave a comment:


  • orbitalpunk
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    im taking the same route as well but more on the pixar side. im a Animation Mentor student and have had 3 pixar animators as teachers already.

    Leave a comment:


  • stitchon
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    I'm sure this has been touched on before, but many Disney people started out working at the parks. John Lasseter worked as a skipper if I'm correct, Tony Baxter was a Submarine Captain, plus a few of the people I have met that now have connections to Disney started out at the parks. Use the job at the parks to your advantage, and use it to help climb the ladder, that's what i'm going to do. College is a good break in between.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rapunzel
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    I'm in character animation at CalArts and Disney is still very much involved in that program. So if you are looking into the artist part of imagineering, that's a good place to look into. We have Disney people through here all the time. Some of the teachers previously worked with WDI as well. I

    Leave a comment:


  • Trac
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    My daughter is just figuring all this out about college too - she is seeing the interactions with classes and what she wants to do with her life - also, something I've always told her and she didn't believe me until now (only took about 7 years for her to understand) It doesn't matter pretty much what your degree is - it's the 2 or 4 or 8 years your in college - the classes you take, the completion of experiences - You can have a Philosophy degree and be an executive at Nissan - get an English degree and get a job as a Captain in a Police Department (and my Dad says that the best cops are those with English degrees - go figure - he's hired hundreds of them)

    Leave a comment:


  • Pirate Lover 68
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    Originally posted by Uncle Bob View Post

    Another interesting aspect of college as compared to high school is that you really begin to understand the interdisciplinary nature of everything. It's fascinating to see a connection between say a political science and design class or a philosophy and physics class. Often I had the wonderful experience of begining a quarter thinking I was taking four totally unrelated classes and then discovering fascinating connections between each subject I was studying. As I progressed, I took a more active role in this, and really began to try and schedule classes that I thought I might find connections through. This in a way helped give a theme to each quarter in my mind, where I could explore other ideas and link everything I was learning in creative and unusual ways.
    Okay, THIS is a GREAT post. I LOVED this part of college. I am so with you, starting the term taking classes that you WISHED had ANYTHING to do with eachother, and several weeks in, you suddenly have this moment where you realize OH MY GOD, they are connected AGAIN!!!! Sorry for all the caps, but you absolutely hit it right on the head, this is a really fun part of college. Very exciting way that college can make knowledge really come alive.

    Leave a comment:


  • pianoman13
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    Originally posted by Datameister View Post
    Not at all!
    cool.......:blush:

    Leave a comment:


  • CaitlinMcFly
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    Thanks guys. No one has really talked to me about college that way before.

    Leave a comment:


  • Uncle Bob
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    Again, I agree with Pirate. As I pointed out in my earlier post, college can offer opprtunities to really learn about specific areas of interest to you that lower education simply doesn't offer. If you are proactive about what you want to do and learn, most good college level professors will give you every opportunity they can to explore those areas. The critical thing is taking control or your own destiny, and deciding what things interest you, even if they don't necessarily seem applicable to your future profession.

    Another interesting aspect of college as compared to high school is that you really begin to understand the interdisciplinary nature of everything. It's fascinating to see a connection between say a political science and design class or a philosophy and physics class. Often I had the wonderful experience of begining a quarter thinking I was taking four totally unrelated classes and then discovering fascinating connections between each subject I was studying. As I progressed, I took a more active role in this, and really began to try and schedule classes that I thought I might find connections through. This in a way helped give a theme to each quarter in my mind, where I could explore other ideas and link everything I was learning in creative and unusual ways.

    Anyway, I think the most important point that both Pirate and I made is that you both can, and to get the most out of it, must be active in shaping your own education. College is truely one of those things you get out of it what you're willing to put in.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pirate Lover 68
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    Originally posted by BellhopPrincess View Post
    I think I've just hit a point where I'm not learning anything new, I'm just being refreshed on things I learned years ago. I want to actually learn, not just show what I already know. Another part of my not wanting to go to college is a fear that what I've experienced so far is just going to continue.
    I would imagine that WAS a frustrating experience, and I can tell you that to have a different experience in college, you will have to find courses that challenge you, and keep pressing your own envelope. You are ultimately in charge of the experience you have. Instructors and other classmates are going to have an impact, but how you react to them is what is going to really color your experience.

    I enjoyed high school, but I absolutely LOVED going to college, because I knew it was all up to me. I was there by CHOICE. I took the classes I wanted to take. I shaped my education from start to finish. I dropped a fair number of classes that I felt weren't giving me the experience I wanted, but more often than not, I was eager to see what the day would bring me, and I was annoyed by students that whined about the work they had to do in class. I thought, "fine, go get a job instead, let ME learn in blissful peace."

    It sounds like you are really bright, and it also sounds like your biggest challenge to making college work and getting where you want to go, is working on YOU. You need to know how to get satisfaction from your education. It's harder to do in High school, because you get signed up for certain classes that you just can't get around. In college, you'll be able to seek out instructors that teach courses that will be of interest to you. Take a completely active role in choosing your college, choosing your courses, and choosing the instructors you want to teach you those courses, and you will go a long way towards having the experience you want to have.

    Leave a comment:


  • lincolnlion09
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    So I am in the LA area and I'm looking at colleges (I am currently a junior). I also hope, along with many others here, to become an imagineer. I am going to look at UCLA thursday and I'm going to find out some more info on that imagineering class.

    Another interesting little bit that I heard from a cast member that I was talking to today in the park was that imagineering doesn't like hiring people who have previously worked for Disney or in a Disney park. He said his friends are doing internships at the park and were told this. Apparently they want fresh ideas coming from someone that is not coming out of the parks. Does anyone know if this is true? Because I wanted to go to school down here and work at the park while I went to college so that way I got my foot in the door with Disney.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaitlinMcFly
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    Originally posted by Pirate Lover 68 View Post
    A college degree isn't just about making more money (heck, at times the couple that I have feel like just the opposite), it shows the people you want to work for that you were able to stick to a plan, and complete it. It ALSO means you generally have a broader knowledge base to draw from because of general education classes, etc.

    When I was first going to college, I was feeling the same way that you described, I was DONE with it and wanted to drop out. I went to my boss and teacher (who taught the Stage Craft Classes) for some advice, he said, if you look at 95% of the people working in the entertainment industry in positions that make any type of decisions; producers, directors, most of the heads of departments... they all have degrees of some type, not just film degrees, but degrees in business, physics, marketing, history, anything.

    Don't think of college as something you HAVE to do to make it to your goal (even if it is), think of it as something you may have the distinct priveledge of GETTING to do. Not only will college offer you the opportunities to take on creative challenges and succeed, or even fail and learn from those failures, it will put you in a near daily contact with other great minds and creative people who you can learn from and gain inspiration.

    Lots of folks on here have already suggested some specific schools and programs that can help you along your path, but I wanted to encourage you to re-examine what college means to you, try to see it not as chore, but as opportunity.
    It was more the fact that I was pushed into it that turned me off to it. I am unfortunate enough to be taken for 25 years old every time I open my mouth (which is good for me in dealing with people who are older since it looks like I always know what I'm taking about) but it's difficult when I have teachers who don't know what to do with me because I can correct them. I can write an A+ college level essay with no rewrites for my english or history classes if prompted. In any class, when there is a "game" to review the material so far, people have fought over me to be on their team just because I'm "smart" and I'll therefore do all the hard stuff for them. I've been turned off on education because of my experiences thus far, with being used, with being not being challenged to the point of not trying anymore because I feel like it's a waste of my time.
    I understand what you're saying, and I know college will probably be a lot more of what I want and need than any of my other education has been in the past four years. I think I've just hit a point where I'm not learning anything new, I'm just being refreshed on things I learned years ago. I want to actually learn, not just show what I already know. Another part of my not wanting to go to college is a fear that what I've experienced so far is just going to continue.
    Originally posted by Steve DeGaetano View Post
    Sheesh...And all this time I thought the secret to a great college experience were the 50 cent well drinks...
    Yeah, that'll be good too
    I mean....no....drinking is bad.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Kath2188
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    That is just so exciting about your friend, she is really living the dream, and the cherry on top was the accademy award!
    Fabulous reaffirmation!

    Leave a comment:


  • Trac
    replied
    Re: How to Become an Imagineer

    One of my oldest friend is a Disney Imagineer - she went to Pepperdine Univ - got her masters in art and now working on her theologian masters- she designs album/CD covers won an award for her Bob Dylan interactive album projetc- she got a job at Sony first, then to Disney, then back to Sony, now back at Disney and now at Nickelodeon

    She is quite the artist - and I knew that when she was in 3rd grade - but then all the kids in her family are either artists or sculpters

    Okay just looked at my friends resume - she worked on Meet the Robinsons, Atlantis, March of the Pengiuns, Polar Express and other projects - she was a featured Artist for Pixart

    She's at Nickoldeon now

    AND the kicker, and I didn't know this - she won an Academy Award in 2002 for her work on Chubb Chubbs - an animated short for Sony
    Last edited by Trac; 03-25-2008, 01:57 PM.

    Leave a comment:

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
Working...
X