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Differences between Team Disney Anaheim and Tokyo Disney Management.

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  • Differences between Team Disney Anaheim and Tokyo Disney Management.

    My families Sig+ passes expire later this month and we have decided we are done going to Disneyland under the current management. We have been giving Tokyo Disneyland some serious consideration. The prices to go to the parks in Tokyo are very affordable as well as some of the good neighbor hotels on the monorail. The only considerable costs associated with the trip is the airfare but I have award card miles that would give me a significant discount on Singapore Airlines which makes the trip more affordable than Anaheim.

    But that brings me to my initial question. How does the management of the two parks differ? I assume both fall under the control of the Bobs, which seem to ruin everything here. But then again, I hear nothing but great things about Tokyo Disneyland, so the Bobs can't possibly have any say if that is the case. Anyone with experience with how both parks run operationally care to offer some insight? I would post this in the Tokyo forum but it seems to have very little activity and many of the posters I have seen there appear to frequent WDW over Disneyland.
    Last edited by tarheelalum; 10-14-2019, 09:30 PM.

  • #2
    As a summary, Disney neither owns nor manages Tokyo Disneyland Resort. This is done by the Oriental Land Company (OLC), so what people praise about TDR is often thanks to decisions from OLC. They for example decide on the investment of new attractions etc (which are build by Disney - but more budget obviously helps). You can search after the Oriental Land Company in this forum and find some more information.

    That being said, not everything is perfect at TDR. Mainly parades and shows also suffer from budget cuts and sometimes feel a little bit poor compared to earlier iterations.

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    • #3
      How is the customer service there? What is the experience like for someone who speaks no Japanese? Is the trip a struggle to get through or is it enjoyable without knowing the language?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by tarheelalum View Post
        How is the customer service there? What is the experience like for someone who speaks no Japanese? Is the trip a struggle to get through or is it enjoyable without knowing the language?
        My husband and I have been to TDR two years in a row now and can't say anything but amazing things about it. We have always been WDW people going a couple of times a year and felt it was time for a change was we have felt the quality of almost everything has gone down, while the pricing has gone up at WDW. After our first visit to TDR we knew that it was now our favorite two parks in the world and we would be back! Needless to say we went back 10 months later and are now planning another trip for May 2020.

        The customer service is top notch - I can't tell you how many times we were thanked for coming all the way to Japan to see them and their parks. Everyone is so courteous, which was a very welcome change from the guests and some of the cast members we have encountered recently in WDW.

        We don't speak more than 5 or 6 words and 1 or 2 sentences in Japanese and never felt like that was an issue. While not all cast members in the parks speak English we didn't feel like it was a real barrier and all signs/menus are in English as well as Japanese.
        Some rides were in English but a lot were in Japanese but to us it didn't make it any less enjoyable. In fact it kind of added to the experience we felt, as 95% of these rides are ones we have done over and over again in the states so to see them in a different way was very interesting.

        We feel that any big Disney Fan should def make the trip to TDR at least once, but they should also read up on Japanese culture and manners - For instance in Japan you don't walk and eat, you don't stand for parades or shows (within the first 7 rows or so of ppl), you don't raise a phone or tablet over your head to take pictures blocking the view of others behind you, you don't run over landscapes, etc. Our first trip we saw almost no American tourists in the parks with us over the span of 5 days....on the second trip we saw a couple of families who unfortunately were treating the parks the way they do in America and it was pretty annoying.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tarheelalum View Post
          How is the customer service there? What is the experience like for someone who speaks no Japanese? Is the trip a struggle to get through or is it enjoyable without knowing the language?
          wallyworld81 summarized it well. The customer service and the cast is definitely topnotch and they will help you no matter what communication issues may arise. For most attractions language is imo not an issue, with the exception of Stitch Encounter and Turtle Talk due to its interactive nature with the public.


          Originally posted by wallyworld81 View Post
          For instance in Japan you don't walk and eat
          While this is generally frowned up in public places, it is completely ok in TDR. There is even an expression for food that is made for eating while walking: Tabearuki (made of as Taberu = Eat, and Aruku = Walk).

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          • #6
            We just went to TDR for the first time (both parks) and we absolutely loved it. Disneyland is my home park, and remains my favorite partly for nostalgia reasons, but DisneySea is my second favorite. It's absolutely amazing. The customer service was VERY noticeably different from DLR - all CM's I encountered were very friendly and truly seemed to take pride in their job. That also has to do with Japan's culture. Also, they wave A LOT, and thank you for coming A LOT - it's quite pleasant. We know extremely limited Japanese and it was not a problem at all. If you don't look Japanese, many will immediately tell you in English wait times before you get in line (it's posted in English as well). We are Japanese, but American and they can tell by how we dress/look that we aren't from there, so they would quickly try to tell you things in English. Any safety/boarding items were mimed, but it's generally the same as any Disney park (ie, put your purse OVER the safety bar, not under). You can hold up fingers, or say in English how many people are in your party as well and they will understand - they learn basic English in Japan. The only time I thought it would be helpful was when the CM's made announcements over the loudspeaker while in line, but that only happened once and it wasn't about the ride being down. As mentioned above, the rides are in Japanese, but you'll notice a lot of English signage throughout. I'm sure if I understood, it would add to it, but it definitely didn't detract from the experience for me. We had a fun Jungle Cruise skipper who was super animated and excited, so it was plenty enjoyable. All the food places have photos or wax versions of the items to see, and we ordered in English and never had an issue OR they have menus you can point to.

            As for the eating and walking, yes it's frowned upon in Japan in general. There are some areas (especially touristy ones) where it is "ok", but I found myself still practicing the no eating and walking unofficial rule because I hardly noticed anyone else walking and eating. You'll notice many benches around carts, even popcorn ones. I did notice many people had popcorn buckets and would eat from them in line, but rarely did I see people eating it sans popcorn bucket. Maybe that's why they are popular, besides the fact they are very adorable. Random tidbit, sizing of portions is different there. A regular sized drink is a lot smaller than a regular sized drink at DLR.

            I will say I prefer Disneyland over Tokyo Disneyland because I love the coziness of smaller walkways. It's not as efficient, but it helps with the immersion. Tokyo Disneyland reminded me of the Magic Kingdom. On the flip side, I loved DisneySea even though it is huge, but it's on another level. So many things to see and discover.

            Lastly, we found pricing reasonable at TDR. Merchandise, food, and tickets were cheaper for the most part. You do have to pay for the monorail, but they have multi day passes. All in all, I HIGHLY recommend going if you are considering it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by wallyworld81 View Post

              My husband and I have been to TDR two years in a row now and can't say anything but amazing things about it. We have always been WDW people going a couple of times a year and felt it was time for a change was we have felt the quality of almost everything has gone down, while the pricing has gone up at WDW. After our first visit to TDR we knew that it was now our favorite two parks in the world and we would be back! Needless to say we went back 10 months later and are now planning another trip for May 2020.

              The customer service is top notch - I can't tell you how many times we were thanked for coming all the way to Japan to see them and their parks. Everyone is so courteous, which was a very welcome change from the guests and some of the cast members we have encountered recently in WDW.

              We don't speak more than 5 or 6 words and 1 or 2 sentences in Japanese and never felt like that was an issue. While not all cast members in the parks speak English we didn't feel like it was a real barrier and all signs/menus are in English as well as Japanese.
              Some rides were in English but a lot were in Japanese but to us it didn't make it any less enjoyable. In fact it kind of added to the experience we felt, as 95% of these rides are ones we have done over and over again in the states so to see them in a different way was very interesting.

              We feel that any big Disney Fan should def make the trip to TDR at least once, but they should also read up on Japanese culture and manners - For instance in Japan you don't walk and eat, you don't stand for parades or shows (within the first 7 rows or so of ppl), you don't raise a phone or tablet over your head to take pictures blocking the view of others behind you, you don't run over landscapes, etc. Our first trip we saw almost no American tourists in the parks with us over the span of 5 days....on the second trip we saw a couple of families who unfortunately were treating the parks the way they do in America and it was pretty annoying.
              Can you buy annual passes there and if so how are the prices?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tarheelalum View Post

                Can you buy annual passes there and if so how are the prices?
                You can but for us the cost didn't make sense for how we were doing our trips. Last time I looked at the pricing it was 91,000 yen for a 2 park annual pass which is roughly $840

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                • #9
                  From my experience (I trained many TDL Cast Members) the culture of Japan lends itself to a more "Guest Centric" hospitality ethos. Far more proper than we are used to in the US. Back in the day, the front line Cast Members felt like they were working in the most amazing place ever on planet earth. Unlike Disneyland day one... when they were just trying to figure things out, TDL was alllll figured out. Not sure how it is now, but the culture I'm sure has not changed much. Don't know if I'd choose TDL over Disneyland, but that is my old school mentality.

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                  • #10
                    So where do the profits from TDL go? Do they end up with the Walt Disney Corporation here in America or do they stay with the management company in Asia. Is TDL like a franchise to Disney?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tarheelalum View Post
                      So where do the profits from TDL go? Do they end up with the Walt Disney Corporation here in America or do they stay with the management company in Asia. Is TDL like a franchise to Disney?
                      TRD is owned and operated by the Oriental Land Company with a license from the Walt Disney company. So they only pay the Walt Disney company royalty and licensing fees.

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                      • #12
                        Then that is my next Disney vacation. I'm tired of how Disneyland is run here. Tokyo sounds more like the Disneyland I loved as a teenager in 1980s. Thank you all for your replies.

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