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Differences between Team Disney Anaheim and Tokyo Disney Management.

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  • CASurfer65
    replied
    Precisely, Wiggins. Eisner was a movie and TV guy. He had no interest or innate talent in addressing the needs of a theme park. So that seemed the likely place to make cuts. And it had an effect sadly.

    I think people realized just how big a part Walt's parks played in the overall scene of who he was. And what he wanted to establish.

    While Walt also started out as a huge movie and TV guy, he had this additional quality that made him special. And it was a talent that went far beyond just running a movie or TV studio. He wanted to bring something tangible into play. A physical space where families could spend time together. And it would begin as a great showplace for his wonderful characters and movies. And from there he would make it oh so much more.

    And part of this was a group of Cast Members who would run the show. They would be special to him and become almost like his second family. And he would treat them that way.

    This continued on for a while after his death. Through the 70s. I have plenty of friends who hired in in the 60s and 70s and said both decades were just great.

    But then the shakeup happened in the mid 80s, and a lot of the CMs who had had such special thoughts about working for the man, and his vision, just didn't feel it anymore. It was clear it had gone corporate. And there was no room for family.

    The Pressler years were especially bad, yes. He took it to the "n"th degree.

    Leave a comment:


  • tarheelalum
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Wiggins View Post

    Great post, CASurfer65, and sadly true. Eisner arrived in '84 and immediately started to squeeze the Park for large profits. Some of his first targets for reduction were CM pay, CM benefits, and the world-famous CM training program, which at that time was key to maintaining Disneyland's hiring standards.




    Eisner put Pressler in charge of Disneyland in '94, with a mandate to deliver double-digit profits. Along with closing rides and slashing maintenance, he doubled down on Eisner's reduction in CM standards.
    And killing people.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Wiggins
    replied
    Originally posted by CASurfer65 View Post
    ...I hired into the park in 1982, and while those of us who hired in at that time probably paled in comparison to those who had hired in during the 70s and 60s, it was still extremely difficult to get a job at Disneyland. In the early 80s it still looked great on a resume.

    By the mid 80s it was already starting to change. Not as difficult to get a job there. A lot of the old timers were starting to leave by then.
    Great post, CASurfer65, and sadly true. Eisner arrived in '84 and immediately started to squeeze the Park for large profits. Some of his first targets for reduction were CM pay, CM benefits, and the world-famous CM training program, which at that time was key to maintaining Disneyland's hiring standards.


    Originally posted by CASurfer65 View Post
    .By the early 90s, after I left, some of my friends told me that all you needed was a pulse and you got hired. Turnover was starting to accelerate. Especially as the 90s moved forward.
    Eisner put Pressler in charge of Disneyland in '94, with a mandate to deliver double-digit profits. Along with closing rides and slashing maintenance, he doubled down on Eisner's reduction in CM standards.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcruise86
    replied

    I'd bet Tokyo Disneyland will have the cleanest & safest parks when they all re-open after this COVID-19 quarantine.
    When I was there, cast members were wiping rails and squeegeeing up puddles after it rained. Japanese people already
    wear masks when they have colds, so avoiding spreading germs will come more easily to them.

    Leave a comment:


  • CASurfer65
    replied
    I would concur with all that has been said here.
    Not only does the OLC clearly embody a work ethic that is almost non-existent here in the States nowadays (so no surprise that Disney CMs here in the States will pale by comparison), but you can just feel the connection to the ideals of Walt when you're there.

    I was a CM at Disneyland in Tomorrowland and Fantasyland Attractions in the 80s and how did we compare?

    Interestingly I would hear from guests about how much nicer the Disneyland CMs were by comparison to the WDW CMs. Which always surprised me as I would have figured we were all pretty much the same. But even then, I would hear things.

    I hired into the park in 1983, and while those of us who hired in at that time probably paled in comparison to those who had hired in during the 70s and 60s, it was still extremely difficult to get a job at Disneyland. In the early 80s it still looked great on a resume.

    By the mid 80s it was already starting to change. Not as difficult to get a job there. A lot of the old timers were starting to leave by then.

    By the early 90s, after I left, some of my friends told me that all you needed was a pulse and you got hired. Turnover was starting to accelerate. Especially as the 90s moved forward.

    The last few times I have gone to Disneyland I have had no issues with the CMs.

    But it can't be denied that as much as I love my country, it is full of some very entitled and enabled people nowadays. And this can lead to lazy and poor work ethics. And more pertinent to Disneyland, IMO, the allowance of facial hair, costumes taken home that look disheveled now, there is just a difference.

    And yet, in 2020....Tokyo CMs still embody that Disney spirit. In fact, I didn't see any apathy in either Tokyo or Shanghai CMs. They were always at the top of their game.

    Again, you could just tell they had more pride in their work. Like the Disneyland of old....up until about the mid 80s or so.
    Last edited by CASurfer65; 06-02-2020, 11:03 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcruise86
    replied
    I went to Tokyo Disneyland years ago and was blown away by the outstanding cast members! The only other Disney CMs in their league were:

    1. Me in the 1980s when I worked on the Disneyland Jungle Cruise, and on Tomorrowland Attractions, especially the Submarine Voyage, and "Guest Control" during the parades where I was assigned to work the handicapped area every day after one of the three Tomorrowland leaders saw that I was awesome at it.

    2. On a Disney Cruise to Alaska. Despite that we had an inside cabin, we always felt like we were in first class.

    3. Walt Disney World in the 1970s. They had many, many applicants for each open position, so like some Trader Joe's locations today or SW Air, they had some great cast members!

    I suggest you only spend two or three days at Tokyo Disneyland, then spend two or three days exploring Tokyo (there are inexpensive hotel rooms if you aren't claustrophobic), and two or three days exploring Kyoto, and splurge on a bullet train from Tokyo to Kyoto. If you go to Japan and spend your whole time at Tokyo Disneyland, people will think you're an idiot. (Forgive me for that, my fellow Micechatters! I am still a true Disney freak!)

    Learn a few Japanese expressions before you go, especially, Hello, Excuse me, Do you speak English?, Please, & Thank you.


    Have you been to Disneyland Paris?
    If not, consider going there too, but if you go there I'd just spend one or two days at the original Disneyland Paris castle park. Skip the Disney Studios there (the world's only really bad Disney park--much worse than DCA, even when DCA opened, in my opinion), and spend a week exploring Paris. Happy to give more detailed suggestions for a trip like that.

    Also consider a Disney Cruise to Alaska or Europe. I'm confident Disney will have the cleanest, most virus-free ships on the oceans when they sail again. Disney Cruise Lines is = to the outstanding Oriental Land Company in their dedication to Walt-like perfection. At least on the Disney Wonder in 2013 they were. Today I'd probably splurge on a room with a balcony. Those unfortunate tourists stuck in inside cabins for days as this virus spread on their ships seemed like they were in a horror movie.

    It's great you're taking your family on a more adventurous holiday than just Disney World--your kids' minds will expand a little--though of course Disney World is wonderful & fascinating, & taking kids there a few times is excellent. It's just not the whole world.
    Last edited by jcruise86; 04-11-2020, 06:45 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • PoopedPirate
    replied
    Walt Disney's original magic kingdom still exists. It's in Tokyo.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tomorrowland_1967
    replied
    Sad difference between state-side Disney Corp vs OLC approach is the Japanese embrace Walt’s standards while America looks to cut corners at every opportunity they can!

    Leave a comment:


  • dancefreak
    replied
    How has no one else mentioned Duffy? You think you know what to expect. Nope. Nothing can prepare you. haha

    Absolutely loved DisneySea. Everything about it. From customer service to unique rides and experiences to the layout and theming to the fact that EVERYTHING (tickets/food/souvenirs) is significantly cheaper versus Anaheim. I think our admission ticket was $68. A beer was five bucks. A full lunch for two at the Italian restaurant including a bottle of wine was like $55--and there's no tipping in Japan. Yes...you DO have to pay for the monorail, but it's only a couple bucks.

    Beyond that, Japan is an amazing destination. Culture is great. People are out of their way courteous. It's a stunningly beautiful country. And the trains...so fantastic! There's English signage everywhere. Even when someone doesn't speak English, you figure it out pretty easily. Unlike if you're in parts of Europe away from tourist centers where someone may get annoyed if you don't speak the language, in Japan there's generally an expectation if you don't look Japanese that you don't speak or understand it. Learning some words or phrases is great of course but no one will be annoyed by you.

    I need to go back!
    Last edited by dancefreak; 01-07-2020, 10:13 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gelatoni97
    replied
    In addition to the excellent Cast Members as already described, one of the other major ways that TDR differs from the rest of the Disney Company is in the area of maintenance. TDR follows a true preventative maintenance program, while the other resorts worldwide are clearly operating via a reactive maintenance plan. The easiest example is a lightbulb: a preventative maintenance plan suggests you replace the lightbulb every two months, regardless of whether or not it is burnt out. By doing so you should always have working lightbulbs. A reactive maintenance plan waits until the lightbulb burns out, and then schedules time, among all the other maintenance projects, to replace it. The reason for adopting the reactive plan is that it is much less expensive. But of course it more often results in bad show.

    When you visit TDR, you don't find burnt out bulbs, broken animatronics, or peeled paint. This is because they have the preventative maintenance program in place, and they follow it strictly. Sinbad is the best example: the number of animatronics in that ride, their incredible lifelike movements, and the fact that they all operate individually and uniquely, wouId suggest this ride would be an easy place to find broken mechanics. Yet on my multiple visits, I have never seen a single piece of that attraction not functioning properly.

    TDR is not perfect, but they are light years ahead of the Disney Company in their approach to maintenance. I daresay Walt probably had a solid preventative maintenance approach in place during his days, but clearly in this era of live-and-die-by-the-quarterly-earnings-results, a reactive maintenance plan is what TWDC has chosen.

    Leave a comment:


  • tarheelalum
    replied
    Then that is my next Disney vacation. I'm tired of how Disneyland is run here. Tokyo sounds more like the Disneyland I loved as a teenager in 1980s. Thank you all for your replies.

    Leave a comment:


  • wallyworld81
    replied
    Originally posted by tarheelalum View Post
    So where do the profits from TDL go? Do they end up with the Walt Disney Corporation here in America or do they stay with the management company in Asia. Is TDL like a franchise to Disney?
    TRD is owned and operated by the Oriental Land Company with a license from the Walt Disney company. So they only pay the Walt Disney company royalty and licensing fees.

    Leave a comment:


  • tarheelalum
    replied
    So where do the profits from TDL go? Do they end up with the Walt Disney Corporation here in America or do they stay with the management company in Asia. Is TDL like a franchise to Disney?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bubu
    replied
    From my experience (I trained many TDL Cast Members) the culture of Japan lends itself to a more "Guest Centric" hospitality ethos. Far more proper than we are used to in the US. Back in the day, the front line Cast Members felt like they were working in the most amazing place ever on planet earth. Unlike Disneyland day one... when they were just trying to figure things out, TDL was alllll figured out. Not sure how it is now, but the culture I'm sure has not changed much. Don't know if I'd choose TDL over Disneyland, but that is my old school mentality.

    Leave a comment:


  • wallyworld81
    replied
    Originally posted by tarheelalum View Post

    Can you buy annual passes there and if so how are the prices?
    You can but for us the cost didn't make sense for how we were doing our trips. Last time I looked at the pricing it was 91,000 yen for a 2 park annual pass which is roughly $840

    Leave a comment:


  • tarheelalum
    replied
    Originally posted by wallyworld81 View Post

    My husband and I have been to TDR two years in a row now and can't say anything but amazing things about it. We have always been WDW people going a couple of times a year and felt it was time for a change was we have felt the quality of almost everything has gone down, while the pricing has gone up at WDW. After our first visit to TDR we knew that it was now our favorite two parks in the world and we would be back! Needless to say we went back 10 months later and are now planning another trip for May 2020.

    The customer service is top notch - I can't tell you how many times we were thanked for coming all the way to Japan to see them and their parks. Everyone is so courteous, which was a very welcome change from the guests and some of the cast members we have encountered recently in WDW.

    We don't speak more than 5 or 6 words and 1 or 2 sentences in Japanese and never felt like that was an issue. While not all cast members in the parks speak English we didn't feel like it was a real barrier and all signs/menus are in English as well as Japanese.
    Some rides were in English but a lot were in Japanese but to us it didn't make it any less enjoyable. In fact it kind of added to the experience we felt, as 95% of these rides are ones we have done over and over again in the states so to see them in a different way was very interesting.

    We feel that any big Disney Fan should def make the trip to TDR at least once, but they should also read up on Japanese culture and manners - For instance in Japan you don't walk and eat, you don't stand for parades or shows (within the first 7 rows or so of ppl), you don't raise a phone or tablet over your head to take pictures blocking the view of others behind you, you don't run over landscapes, etc. Our first trip we saw almost no American tourists in the parks with us over the span of 5 days....on the second trip we saw a couple of families who unfortunately were treating the parks the way they do in America and it was pretty annoying.
    Can you buy annual passes there and if so how are the prices?

    Leave a comment:


  • Squidgit
    replied
    We just went to TDR for the first time (both parks) and we absolutely loved it. Disneyland is my home park, and remains my favorite partly for nostalgia reasons, but DisneySea is my second favorite. It's absolutely amazing. The customer service was VERY noticeably different from DLR - all CM's I encountered were very friendly and truly seemed to take pride in their job. That also has to do with Japan's culture. Also, they wave A LOT, and thank you for coming A LOT - it's quite pleasant. We know extremely limited Japanese and it was not a problem at all. If you don't look Japanese, many will immediately tell you in English wait times before you get in line (it's posted in English as well). We are Japanese, but American and they can tell by how we dress/look that we aren't from there, so they would quickly try to tell you things in English. Any safety/boarding items were mimed, but it's generally the same as any Disney park (ie, put your purse OVER the safety bar, not under). You can hold up fingers, or say in English how many people are in your party as well and they will understand - they learn basic English in Japan. The only time I thought it would be helpful was when the CM's made announcements over the loudspeaker while in line, but that only happened once and it wasn't about the ride being down. As mentioned above, the rides are in Japanese, but you'll notice a lot of English signage throughout. I'm sure if I understood, it would add to it, but it definitely didn't detract from the experience for me. We had a fun Jungle Cruise skipper who was super animated and excited, so it was plenty enjoyable. All the food places have photos or wax versions of the items to see, and we ordered in English and never had an issue OR they have menus you can point to.

    As for the eating and walking, yes it's frowned upon in Japan in general. There are some areas (especially touristy ones) where it is "ok", but I found myself still practicing the no eating and walking unofficial rule because I hardly noticed anyone else walking and eating. You'll notice many benches around carts, even popcorn ones. I did notice many people had popcorn buckets and would eat from them in line, but rarely did I see people eating it sans popcorn bucket. Maybe that's why they are popular, besides the fact they are very adorable. Random tidbit, sizing of portions is different there. A regular sized drink is a lot smaller than a regular sized drink at DLR.

    I will say I prefer Disneyland over Tokyo Disneyland because I love the coziness of smaller walkways. It's not as efficient, but it helps with the immersion. Tokyo Disneyland reminded me of the Magic Kingdom. On the flip side, I loved DisneySea even though it is huge, but it's on another level. So many things to see and discover.

    Lastly, we found pricing reasonable at TDR. Merchandise, food, and tickets were cheaper for the most part. You do have to pay for the monorail, but they have multi day passes. All in all, I HIGHLY recommend going if you are considering it.

    Leave a comment:


  • slapshot
    replied
    Originally posted by tarheelalum View Post
    How is the customer service there? What is the experience like for someone who speaks no Japanese? Is the trip a struggle to get through or is it enjoyable without knowing the language?
    wallyworld81 summarized it well. The customer service and the cast is definitely topnotch and they will help you no matter what communication issues may arise. For most attractions language is imo not an issue, with the exception of Stitch Encounter and Turtle Talk due to its interactive nature with the public.


    Originally posted by wallyworld81 View Post
    For instance in Japan you don't walk and eat
    While this is generally frowned up in public places, it is completely ok in TDR. There is even an expression for food that is made for eating while walking: Tabearuki (made of as Taberu = Eat, and Aruku = Walk).

    Leave a comment:


  • wallyworld81
    replied
    Originally posted by tarheelalum View Post
    How is the customer service there? What is the experience like for someone who speaks no Japanese? Is the trip a struggle to get through or is it enjoyable without knowing the language?
    My husband and I have been to TDR two years in a row now and can't say anything but amazing things about it. We have always been WDW people going a couple of times a year and felt it was time for a change was we have felt the quality of almost everything has gone down, while the pricing has gone up at WDW. After our first visit to TDR we knew that it was now our favorite two parks in the world and we would be back! Needless to say we went back 10 months later and are now planning another trip for May 2020.

    The customer service is top notch - I can't tell you how many times we were thanked for coming all the way to Japan to see them and their parks. Everyone is so courteous, which was a very welcome change from the guests and some of the cast members we have encountered recently in WDW.

    We don't speak more than 5 or 6 words and 1 or 2 sentences in Japanese and never felt like that was an issue. While not all cast members in the parks speak English we didn't feel like it was a real barrier and all signs/menus are in English as well as Japanese.
    Some rides were in English but a lot were in Japanese but to us it didn't make it any less enjoyable. In fact it kind of added to the experience we felt, as 95% of these rides are ones we have done over and over again in the states so to see them in a different way was very interesting.

    We feel that any big Disney Fan should def make the trip to TDR at least once, but they should also read up on Japanese culture and manners - For instance in Japan you don't walk and eat, you don't stand for parades or shows (within the first 7 rows or so of ppl), you don't raise a phone or tablet over your head to take pictures blocking the view of others behind you, you don't run over landscapes, etc. Our first trip we saw almost no American tourists in the parks with us over the span of 5 days....on the second trip we saw a couple of families who unfortunately were treating the parks the way they do in America and it was pretty annoying.

    Leave a comment:


  • tarheelalum
    replied
    How is the customer service there? What is the experience like for someone who speaks no Japanese? Is the trip a struggle to get through or is it enjoyable without knowing the language?

    Leave a comment:

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