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Is it worth getting the no-expire option?

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  • #21
    Related question on "child" tickets

    Does anyone know how they treat the no-expire option for children who got the pass as a child's ticket and come back as an 'adult' [which I think is over 9]? Would he still be able to get in with the child's ticket if he was 10? 14? 30?

    I still have 3 days left on a pass and my oldest will cross this line before our next trip. He probably will still be able to 'pass,' when we next go, but I'm just curious about the policy and enforcement.

    Thanks!
    20k

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    • #22
      Re: Is it worth getting the no-expire option?

      Originally posted by jcruise86 View Post
      Three questions:

      1. (a 4 parter) How much extra is the "No expiration date" option on 7, 8, 9, and 10 day WDW park-hopper tickets?

      2. Do they still sell "length of stay" passes when you stay at WDW resorts?

      3. If I knew we were going back to WDW three years after our first trip, would I be better off getting "length of stay" passes each time, or getting park hopper passes for a few days longer than our first stay with the no-expiration option?

      Note: I might just get the longer passes for my wife and me because me daughter would turn ten in between our two trips. Maybe we should just get the "length of stay" passes for her.
      I always make sure to get the "No Expiration" option on my park hoppers. I had passes from 2000 that still had a couple of days left on them and when I went down last october, they still worked. So it was nice to have those extra days to use as reserve and not tap into my new park hopper pass that I got when I was there in Oct. Now the park hopper I got in Oct 2008 has a day or two left, and that also has the no expiration. If I dont go back for another few years, at least I know I still have days.

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      • #23
        Re: Is it worth getting the no-expire option?

        I'm just posting here on behalf of the "no expire" feature.

        I went to WDW just a few weeks ago and used park hoppers from the last time we went to WDW....7 years ago. And they still worked.

        Believe me the no expire feature is worth it if you're willing to pay a lil extra.


        My home away from home! If I don't make it as a CP that's where I wanna work!
        (Picture Taken by Me!)

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        • #24
          Re: Is it worth getting the no-expire option?

          It all depends on your travel style. If you plan on going back later for just a day or two.. they are awesome. But is that what you are doing?

          Sure having left over tickets is great... unless you paid more for that left over then if you just bought new tickets. Which is what can happen. The pricing model is built to discount (significantly) longer stay tickets. Anything that prevents you from buying longer stay tickets drives up your cost/day.

          Using left-over tickets + new tickets on the same trip is what is costly and where Disney wins.

          Simply look at the cost you are paying now, and what your next trip is likely to be like. In MANY cases you are paying more for the privilege of using the left-overs vs. what it would cost simply to buy new tickets next time.

          A simplistic way of looking at it is...

          If your next trip will be shorter then this one.. and you can fit it all on one 10 day park ticket = no expire = good
          If your next trip plus this one will be longer then you can fit on one 10 day park ticket = usually no-expire a bad deal. Do your math
          Check out my blog - Coreplex: Rambling from inside the Grid


          Am I evil? yes, I am
          Am I evil? I am man, yes, I am

          Originally posted by sleepyjeff
          Disneyland was meant to be sipped not chug-a-lugged

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          • #25
            Re: Is it worth getting the no-expire option?

            Originally posted by jcruise86 View Post
            Three questions:

            1. (a 4 parter) How much extra is the "No expiration date" option on 7, 8, 9, and 10 day WDW park-hopper tickets?

            2. Do they still sell "length of stay" passes when you stay at WDW resorts?

            3. If I knew we were going back to WDW three years after our first trip, would I be better off getting "length of stay" passes each time, or getting park hopper passes for a few days longer than our first stay with the no-expiration option?

            Note: I might just get the longer passes for my wife and me because me daughter would turn ten in between our two trips. Maybe we should just get the "length of stay" passes for her.

            Answers:
            1. The price per person (assuming your non FL resident) for MYW + PH + NE is as follows:

            • 7 day - $413.22 Adult, $375.95 child
            • 8 day - $453.69 Adult, $416.42 Child
            • 9 day - $483.51 Adult, $446.24 Child
            • 10 Day - $518.66 Adult, $481.38 Child


            2. No there are no length of stay tickets anymore they have all been rolled into the MYW ticket system, and yes I know it really drives the cost way up!

            3. The tickets should still be good if you do a NE option, but I really don't think it's worth the money, in fact I was looking at doing the same kind of thing this year since I had an Travel Agency event last January and knew I would be coming back again this year, when I priced it out (needed an additional couple days that trip over the comp 2 day pass they gave me) I found it was cheaper to do an Annual Pass once you hit the 8 day mark, so now I'm going down 3 times this year rather than once due to the AP discounts and special offers.

            Note however in your case I would just do MYW tickets for each trip separately since it's so far in-between. (AP's are only good for 365 days) Where Disney really makes a good chunk of money is all those tickets people buy the NE option for and then loose when they get home! :ap: That plus with various offers like free Dining and the previous buy four or more days get 3 free promotions you can sometimes get a better deal. And As Flynn points out above if you wind up buying 2-3 days extra on that second trip they really made money off of you!

            Water Parks are a different story alltogether, if you decide to do the NE option add the extra $50/ticket to get the water parks and more option, even if you don't use the extra day or two on the main parkhopper side of the ticket, the water parks run $50/day per adult so you can save money on future trips to the water parks and that will save you quite a lot there! (You save $450 on with a 10 day NE MYW ticket with WP option on future water park day trips over the $50/day price that way)
            Last edited by Jerren; 05-06-2009, 12:37 PM.
            Hi I'm Jerren and I'm a Disneyholic...

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            • #26
              Re: Related question on "child" tickets

              Originally posted by 20,000 Sheets to the Wind View Post
              Does anyone know how they treat the no-expire option for children who got the pass as a child's ticket and come back as an 'adult' [which I think is over 9]? Would he still be able to get in with the child's ticket if he was 10? 14? 30?
              No. If I'm recalling correctly, Guest Services can apply the cost of the child's ticket towards the cost of an adult pass.

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              • #27
                Re: Related question on "child" tickets

                Originally posted by 20,000 Sheets to the Wind View Post
                Does anyone know how they treat the no-expire option for children who got the pass as a child's ticket and come back as an 'adult' [which I think is over 9]? Would he still be able to get in with the child's ticket if he was 10? 14? 30?

                I still have 3 days left on a pass and my oldest will cross this line before our next trip. He probably will still be able to 'pass,' when we next go, but I'm just curious about the policy and enforcement.

                Thanks!
                20k
                The policy is that they will, at no cost, upgrade that child's ticket to an adult ticket. Two things: the ticket must have been used at least once; the "adult" using the upgraded ticket must be the "child" for whom the ticket was bought. For example, let's say you have an 8 year old and a 13 year old, and you take ONLY the 8 year old on your trip. You have a few days leftover on that ticket. You go back 3 years later, when the 8 year old is 11 and therefore would need an adult ticket. However, you don't take the 11 year old, you take your now-16 year old ... you won't be permitted to upgrade that child ticket to be used by the 16 year old.

                If you had twin 8 year olds and only one went with you the first time, and then the other went with you the second time 3 years later, there would be no way for Disney to know that it's 2 different people, because their ages are the same.

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                • #28
                  Re: Is it worth getting the no-expire option?

                  Let me give an example of how the No Expiration option can be a TERRIBLE idea:

                  Let's say you know you'll go to parks for 7 days during this vacation, and then 7 days about 2 years from now. Your two options would be to buy a 10-day non-expiring ticket, have 3 days leftover, and then buy a regular 4-day ticket 2 years from now; OR to buy a regular 7-day ticket for this trip and then 2 years later buy another regular 7 days ticket for that trip.

                  I'll show you the math that proves, in this scenario, the No Expiration option would waste HUNDREDS of dollars.

                  No Expiration option:
                  A 10-day No Expiration ticket costs $437. Then the additional regular 4-day ticket costs $219. Your total cost for 14 park days is $656.

                  Separate tickets option:
                  One 7-day ticket costs $228. Another 7-day ticket costs $228. Your total cost for 14 park days is $456.

                  In this scenario, buying the No Expiration option would cost you $200 extra per adult, as compared with buying separate tickets for each trip.

                  I believe it was flynnibus who was the first in this thread to correctly point out that the No Expiration option is a fabulous money-saver for people who tae numerous short trips. For example, if you do 2 park days per trip, you can do 5 trips with that $437 10-day NE ticket. But without NE, you'd pay $149 for each 2-day ticket, which would mean $745 for those same 10 park days. Obviously, in a case like that, the NE is much better.

                  But you have to do the math. And if you aren't 100% sure what your future plans are, then you can't do the math. And in that case, I advise against "betting" that the NE option won't accidentally cost you hundreds of dollars of wasted money.

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                  • #29
                    Re: Is it worth getting the no-expire option?

                    yup.. did a similar example in Post #10

                    You gotta plan ahead
                    Check out my blog - Coreplex: Rambling from inside the Grid


                    Am I evil? yes, I am
                    Am I evil? I am man, yes, I am

                    Originally posted by sleepyjeff
                    Disneyland was meant to be sipped not chug-a-lugged

                    Comment

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