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  • #21
    Re: 1 billion on the new queue system or give hollywood studios the DCA treatment

    Originally posted by taagsmash View Post
    It really depends.

    If interactive queues aren't just video games, then I'm down for them (just not $1 billion wroth) So yes, I would like the money to go to improving parks that are lacking, but DCA treatment implies destroying theme. And that is something I would not like to see.
    Thats not what I implied at all! To me the OP the DCA treatment means a major overhaul that fixes a flawed park!

    Originally posted by PeoplemoverMatt View Post
    Well, you actually don't miss *all* of that when going through Everest's FastPass queue. While it is true that not everything in the stand-by queue can be seen from the FP queue, there are some things in the FP queue that can't be seen in the Stand-by queue. And let's try not paint a false picture where literally any & all immersive theme elements are completely missed by using FP on Everest. There's a whole lot of immersion to be had even with the FastPass.

    Having to choose between highly-immersive themed queues and FastPass is a false choice. There's plenty of immersion to be had the various FP queues of WDW from Mission: Space to Test Track to Everest to Pooh to the rest. Is some stuff missed? Yes, but it isn't like there is nothing.



    Oh please.. No one's holding a gun to anyone's head and forcing them to sprint down the queue as fast as they possibly can while wearing a blindfold, as you imply People can walk at their own pace and observe all the details however they choose to. The people I see doing any sort of "rushing" down Indy's queue are the people who've seen Indy's queue a few hundred times, and don't need to examine every square millimeter of the queue because they already have multiple times, but still enjoy riding the ride. That's one of the ways Disneyland CA is different than WDW FL. The locals know precisely what's there and don't need to spend another hour examining it. First-timers are free to examine at their leisure, but hopefully they don't mind people walking around/past them.

    But more to the point, FastPass didn't create that situation. If the FastPass queue/Stand-by queue merge point was at the film room rather than the temple's entrance, you might have a point, but the merge is actually at the temple entrance. There is no shortcutting. There are no queue elements 'missed' unless people choose to miss them. Disney wasn't brainless in their choice of where to put the merge point.

    I'd imagine you'll see more of this in the future when NextGen takes hold. It's looking like Disney considers the attraction queue of the future to be a shorter FastPass (or whatever it's called) queue that contains some, but not all, thematic elements...and an immersive/interactive Stand-By queue filled with all sorts of diversions from kids' toys to video games to trivia questions to what have you.

    We'll have a choice, just like we have now, only then the choice may not be between FastPass and being stuck in line with nothing to do. Now Stand-by'ers might have quite a bit to do, which will increase the number of people choosing Stand-by, like mickdaddy & King Eric here, and having a great time with it. I'm all for that, though I'll probably still primarily use FastPass whenever/however I can much like I do now.

    In response to the OP, I'm not sure what the "DCA treatment" is, but if it's a $1 Billion capital expansion in shows/attractions, I sure wouldn't mind that coming to the Studios one day, but it doesn't need to be a one or the other thing with NextGen. NextGen is just the latest project to come down the pike. One of the greatest parts of the theme park industry is that this never ends. There's always something to look forward to, and then something to look forward to after that. I'd imagine you'll see "the DCA treatment" coming to the Studios and other places in WDW quite soon. In fact, I'd point to the Hyperion Wharf project as possible evidence that it's already here.
    I for one never attacked the fast pass system just simply stated that you do miss elements of the ride experience in some of the fast pass queues. Second yes of course you can spend all the time in the world in the Indy Queue if you choose but there is an element of being rushed and pushed in some of the areas that do not easily let others by you. And when I say elements missed I will bet there are people that have rode Indy thousands of times and do not know that if you pull the bambo in the skull room the ceiling colapses and certain diamond triger air blasts when you step on them and if you pull the rope in the well the researcher yells at you. These are the elements I say are being missed not just the look of the area!
    When I say DCA treatment I am refering to a major overhaul. I also see change coming but I don't see it in that major of a form!
    BGood! It's not just my motto its my name!

    Comment


    • #22
      Re: 1 billion on the new queue system or give hollywood studios the DCA treatment

      Originally posted by WDWFigment View Post
      I still think you're reducing this to overly-simplistic terms. First, you cite poll results. Well, this poll is on an undeniably skewed site. Not only that, if you ask people if they want more attractions or a system that maximizes their spending, what do you think they're going to say? Then, you cite diehard fans heading to TDR for its quality. I don't doubt people are doing this, but how many individuals in the general public do this versus opt for visiting one of the domestic parks?

      Quality is a great business plan, there is no doubt about that. TDO has been resting on its laurels for a number of years, there is no doubt about that, either. However, there comes a point in given markets where increased quality is superfluous, and money is better spent elsewhere (for the purposes of ROI). In Orlando, given the audience, it probably is the case that the average guest thinks the parks are great quality. These guests are infrequent tourists, used to Six Flags. Investing in new and high quality experiences may draw some more fervent guests or repeat visitors, but can you definitively say it's better for business than maximizing the spending of most guests (which is the true nature of this project, so all the discussion about FastPasses and wait times is irrelevant)? I know I can't.

      I'm not saying that I personally don't want more rides and attractions. For me, personally, that is much more likely to maximize my spending at WDW. However, I accept and realize that I'm not the average guest. If you have nearly 2,500 posts in an online forum about Disney, neither are you. I wouldn't be so quick to equate what anyone here wants with what Disney should do.
      You show a lot of faith in a system that none of us has experienced yet. You also show tremendous faith in the judgement of the suits at Disney.

      Who says this will maximize spending? Disney's spreadsheets and market research? Hooey. $1 billion could buy some amazing new attractions and lands, and what gets people running to the parks faster than cool new stuff? Give people a reason to come to your resort more often, a reason to stay longer, give them something new to see, and they will spend to get in, and spend while they're there. Give them great new attractions, and they will buy souvenirs to remember how exciting it was.

      This new queue system is a better money making option than what people actually want? That's funny, because over at Universal, they spent a lot of money to create an exceptional land and attraction (i.e., what people want) and attendance there went up 36 %. On top of that, people are opening their wallets to buy butterbeer, wands, and assorted Potter souvenirs. Adding quality to their parks was far from "superfluous."

      You readily concede that TDO has been resting on its laurels for a number of years, i.e., they haven't done enough to maximize the quality of their parks. Yet you don't think that is the resort's top priority, and best use for a billion bucks. If they've been complacent in the past, then improvement becomes increasingly urgent. Disney's rivals are starting to catch up to them; see the example in the paragraph above.

      As for the poll, you could ask people walking in the turnstyles at any Disney park, and you'll get the same response. People go to the parks for exceptional theme park entertainment, not for yet another reservation/queue system.

      P.S.: You misquoted Mr. Lasseter. He didn't say that quality is a great business plan; he said quality is the best business plan. And he's right. I think he proved it, too, when a tiny animation house stole Disney's thunder and forced them to spend an outrageous $7.4 billion to buy Pixar. How did Pixar pull off this amazing feat? They made great movies. That's it.

      Quality is the best business plan. A hell of a lot better than spending tons of money on a soulless, computerized, supposedly spending-maximization high tech hoohah.
      Last edited by disneyfann121; 02-25-2011, 01:47 PM.

      Comment


      • #23
        Re: 1 billion on the new queue system or give hollywood studios the DCA treatment

        ^ This.
        "Disneyland is often called a magic kingdom because
        it combines fantasy and history, adventure and learning,
        together with every variety of recreation and fun,
        designed to appeal to everyone."

        - Walt Disney

        "Disneyland is all about turning movies into rides."
        - Michael Eisner

        Comment


        • #24
          Re: 1 billion on the new queue system or give hollywood studios the DCA treatment

          Originally posted by disneyfann121 View Post
          You show a lot of faith in a system that none of us has experienced yet. You also show tremendous faith in the judgement of the suits at Disney.

          Who says this will maximize spending? Disney's spreadsheets and market research? Hooey. $1 billion could buy some amazing new attractions and lands, and what gets people running to the parks faster than cool new stuff? Give people a reason to come to your resort more often, a reason to stay longer, give them something new to see, and they will spend to get in, and spend while they're there. Give them great new attractions, and they will buy souvenirs to remember how exciting it was.

          This new queue system is a better money making option than what people actually want? That's funny, because over at Universal, they spent a lot of money to create an exceptional land and attraction (i.e., what people want) and attendance there went up 36 %. On top of that, people are opening their wallets to buy butterbeer, wands, and assorted Potter souvenirs. Adding quality to their parks was far from "superfluous."

          You readily concede that TDO has been resting on its laurels for a number of years, i.e., they haven't done enough to maximize the quality of their parks. Yet you don't think that is the resort's top priority, and best use for a billion bucks. If they've been complacent in the past, then improvement becomes increasingly urgent. Disney's rivals are starting to catch up to them; see the example in the paragraph above.

          As for the poll, you could ask people walking in the turnstyles at any Disney park, and you'll get the same response. People go to the parks for exceptional theme park entertainment, not for yet another reservation/queue system.

          P.S.: You misquoted Mr. Lasseter. He didn't say that quality is a great business plan; he said quality is the best business plan. And he's right. I think he proved it, too, when a tiny animation house stole Disney's thunder and forced them to spend an outrageous $7.4 billion to buy Pixar. How did Pixar pull off this amazing feat? They made great movies. That's it.

          Quality is the best business plan. A hell of a lot better than spending tons of money on a soulless, computerized, supposedly spending-maximization high tech hoohah.
          Great post!
          BGood! It's not just my motto its my name!

          Comment


          • #25
            Re: 1 billion on the new queue system or give hollywood studios the DCA treatment

            Originally posted by mickdaddy View Post
            So for a really long time I have felt that the Hollywood Studios needed some major help. The universal type theme is really not working especially with Universal right down the road. Should Disney have put the 1 Billion they are investing in this new reservation based queue system or would it be better spent reviving Hollywood studios?

            What are your thoughts?
            Um, you 're referring to this second, billion-dollar DCA treatment, and not the first, billion-dollar DCA calamity?

            Comment


            • #26
              Re: 1 billion on the new queue system or give hollywood studios the DCA treatment

              Originally posted by KingEric View Post
              Second: The Forbidden Journey at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Islands of Adventure at the Universal Orlando Resort in Orlando Florida is the perfect example of what a theme park attraction should be. I feel that if you spend less than 40 mins in Hogwarts it lessens the experience of the ride.

              In the end people are not paying money to go to a theme park so that they can just go on the highest number of flat rides like at a carnival. People go to escape, be taken out of their world, have an adventure, and bond with family and friends.
              Yes but waiting 2-3 hours to ride only one of 5 rides in a single park such as TSMM is completely unjustified. No one should have to wait more than an hour at most to ride anything, especially family rides.

              I don't mind the interactive queues but there are better ways to deal with the crowding situation such as adding more rides to absorb crowd traffic. Shows can only absorb traffic during a few scheduled times in the day but constantly operating rides can absorb a little every 5 minutes. Whatever helps.

              And DHS should not even be a half day park considering they have both day and night events.

              Comment


              • #27
                Re: 1 billion on the new queue system or give hollywood studios the DCA treatment

                Originally posted by sediment View Post
                Um, you 're referring to this second, billion-dollar DCA treatment, and not the first, billion-dollar DCA calamity?
                yes the current one trying to fix the first!
                BGood! It's not just my motto its my name!

                Comment


                • #28
                  Re: 1 billion on the new queue system or give hollywood studios the DCA treatment

                  I cant fathom that what they want to do would really cost a billion dollars? Room keys in advance, a more centralized and fastpass system. It just seems like for a billion dollars these RFID supposed interactive ques etc better improve the guest experience. If DCA can spend a billion dollars and add quality attractions. Disneyworld should have the same thing

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Re: 1 billion on the new queue system or give hollywood studios the DCA treatment

                    Originally posted by disneyfann121 View Post
                    You show a lot of faith in a system that none of us has experienced yet. You also show tremendous faith in the judgement of the suits at Disney.

                    Who says this will maximize spending? Disney's spreadsheets and market research? Hooey. $1 billion could buy some amazing new attractions and lands, and what gets people running to the parks faster than cool new stuff? Give people a reason to come to your resort more often, a reason to stay longer, give them something new to see, and they will spend to get in, and spend while they're there. Give them great new attractions, and they will buy souvenirs to remember how exciting it was.

                    This new queue system is a better money making option than what people actually want? That's funny, because over at Universal, they spent a lot of money to create an exceptional land and attraction (i.e., what people want) and attendance there went up 36 %. On top of that, people are opening their wallets to buy butterbeer, wands, and assorted Potter souvenirs. Adding quality to their parks was far from "superfluous."

                    You readily concede that TDO has been resting on its laurels for a number of years, i.e., they haven't done enough to maximize the quality of their parks. Yet you don't think that is the resort's top priority, and best use for a billion bucks. If they've been complacent in the past, then improvement becomes increasingly urgent. Disney's rivals are starting to catch up to them; see the example in the paragraph above.

                    As for the poll, you could ask people walking in the turnstyles at any Disney park, and you'll get the same response. People go to the parks for exceptional theme park entertainment, not for yet another reservation/queue system.

                    P.S.: You misquoted Mr. Lasseter. He didn't say that quality is a great business plan; he said quality is the best business plan. And he's right. I think he proved it, too, when a tiny animation house stole Disney's thunder and forced them to spend an outrageous $7.4 billion to buy Pixar. How did Pixar pull off this amazing feat? They made great movies. That's it.

                    Quality is the best business plan. A hell of a lot better than spending tons of money on a soulless, computerized, supposedly spending-maximization high tech hoohah.
                    \

                    This is a great post, Disneyfann. I wholeheartedly agree with the "Quality Wins Out" strategy.

                    However, WDWFigment does a very good job of analyzing/outlining the thought-process of the Disney exec. They said, "we've got this colossal cow (WDW) that costs us a lot to maintain and improve, so how do we make certain we are squeezing as much cash out of it as possible?" The answer their business analysts came up with was this NextGen thing - people waiting in lines aren't spending money on food & merchandise. Also, running rides to maximum operational efficiency saves money.

                    Unfortunately, the short-term incentive plans (which motivate all execs to do what they do) demand growth every quarter & year. Investing hundreds of millions of additional dollars in stellar upkeep and fresh, excellent attractions across WDW is far less rewarding (in cash to execs), than upping prices, merch-sales, DVC units, etc. I'm sure this next-gen thing is seen (via the models & spreadsheets) as a golden goose that will significantly increase profitability annually, in perpetuity, thus worth $1billion. Time will tell if they are right. And if it does make WDW significantly more profitable, maybe some of that will be re-invested in quality additions and improved maintenance.

                    Again, I think the best use of $1billion is to make the parks the best they can be - in things to do, in design detail, in original attractions, in thematic coherency, in retail diversity, in quality live entertainment. That is what compels me to spend with Disney. But as a fan outside the company, I, we, want the best for WDW for the long-term. Disney execs are focused on making their next 1-, 3-year (short-term) financial performance goals.
                    Last edited by RandySavage; 02-25-2011, 09:44 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Re: 1 billion on the new queue system or give hollywood studios the DCA treatment

                      Originally posted by RandySavage View Post
                      \

                      This is a great post, Disneyfann. I wholeheartedly agree with the "Quality Wins Out" strategy.

                      However, WDWFigment does a very good job of analyzing/outlining the thought-process of the Disney exec. They said, "we've got this colossal cow (WDW) that costs us a lot to maintain and improve, so how do we make certain we are squeezing as much cash out of it as possible?" The answer their business analysts came up with was this NextGen thing - people waiting in lines aren't spending money on food & merchandise. Also, running rides to maximum operational efficiency saves money.

                      Unfortunately, the short-term incentive plans (which motivate all execs to do what they do) demand growth every quarter & year. Investing hundreds of millions of additional dollars in stellar upkeep and fresh, excellent attractions across WDW is far less rewarding (in cash to execs), than upping prices, merch-sales, DVC units, etc. I'm sure this next-gen thing is seen (via the models & spreadsheets) as a golden goose that will significantly increase profitability annually, in perpetuity, thus worth $1billion. Time will tell if they are right. And if it does make WDW significantly more profitable, maybe some of that will be re-invested in quality additions and improved maintenance.

                      Again, I think the best use of $1billion is to make the parks the best they can be - in things to do, in design detail, in original attractions, in thematic coherency, in retail diversity, in quality live entertainment. That is what compels me to spend with Disney. But as a fan outside the company, I, we, want the best for WDW for the long-term. Disney execs are focused on making their next 1-, 3-year (short-term) financial performance goals.
                      I know what their focus is.

                      And that's the problem.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Re: 1 billion on the new queue system or give hollywood studios the DCA treatment

                        Disney could do both, if they really wanted to. They seem to pull money out of their hat easily enough if desired, like they did when purchasing Marvel, etc.

                        There were so many great ideas for DHS that were considered at the beginning of the "Disney Decade" circa 1990. I would love to see some of those become reality, together with brand new concepts.
                        Down with the Hat

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