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  • [Question] Disney Park Etiquette Guide

    Having been a Disney park enthusiast for nearly my entire life as well as a one-time cast member I love going to the parks. My wife and I visit frequently. When I read posts in the forum as well as the weekly park updates I understand some peoples concerns regarding park management and maintenance issues. While I too do notice the occasional maintenance issue the one thing that can really ruin a theme park experience for me is the sometimes rude and/or obnoxious behavior of my fellow park guests. My idea is this, and where I would like to call on fellow park goers to assist, create a book or guide that defines what proper behavior and etiquette should be from someone visiting the parks. It should be something that someone from any background or region can read and hopefully take to heart when planning a visit.

    So give me some ideas, go into as much detail as you think is necessary to get the point across but don't be rude (after all this is a guide for etiquette). I will get started with a few simple but sometimes overlooked themes; no smoking outside of designated areas (this has gotten better over the years but still some folks refuse to cooperate), no holding places in line for late arriving party members (I can't tell you how many foreign visitors seem to think this is O.K. to do), staking out spots for parades/fireworks/shows in advance is O.K. but don't expect others to define the space as yours (in other words just because you spread a 2-foot blanket or towel on the ground with one person sitting on it does not mean that someone trying to just get by can't invade your space).

    Etiquette on the use of strollers could probably have its own chapter. Along with controlling child behavior (I don't have children so perhaps I am just a little less tolerant).

    Anyway this is my idea. Let me know what you think.

  • #2
    Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

    I think almost everything boils down to the Golden Rule. Treat other people as if they're just as important as you, and as if their needs are just as important as yours. Because - they are! Don't put a set of blinders on and forget you're sharing the park with thousands of your fellow travelers.

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    • #3
      Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

      Originally posted by ttintagel View Post
      I think almost everything boils down to the Golden Rule. Treat other people as if they're just as important as you, and as if their needs are just as important as yours. Because - they are! Don't put a set of blinders on and forget you're sharing the park with thousands of your fellow travelers.

      The problem with this is too may people think they are "above" this and everyone else is in "their" park.

      I would like to see everyone treat the part like a very rich uncles park. Be nice and you stay in the will, if not ...

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      • #4
        Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

        We have been to WDW seven times over the past ten years, and have seen a lot of what you have talked about.
        Here are a few thoughts for your book:

        - Movement of people: This is the US, we drive on the right side of the road, we walk on the right side of the walkways; please stay on the correct side, so not to have the "swimming up stream" effect on an entire area.
        - Movement of people: If you need to stop, for any reason, realize you are not the only persons in the park. Do not just stop in the middle of the walkways, please move off to the side.
        - Electronic devices: I realize some people cannot "unplug", but when you are in any moving groups of people (ie walking around parks, moving from holding areas to ride/seating areas) please pay attention to what is going on around you at that moment, and not your device.
        - Party staying together: If you are traveling as a group, please keep track of each other, especially children. And yelling your childs name across the room, while you continue to shop, is not usually considered polite proceedure.
        - Move all the way to the end of the row: Not sure how to reinforce this issue; maybe over emphasize there are "no bad seats", and possibly position cast members in the middle of groups, to walk through with visitors, to "keep people moving".
        - Please and Thank You: I believe these three words are totally underused in our world. Lead by example?
        - I'm not your doorman: If you see someone holding open a door for people, offer to take over for them, and continue to trade off. It seems as once you open and hold a door, that became your full time job.

        Just a few thoughts - I'm sure there are more I'm missing...

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        • #5
          Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

          All great points, but i'll just add one- don't take flash pictures on dark rides! It not only ruins the atmosphere for you and the other guests, it can cause significant wear and tear on the attraction itself. One bright camera flash is the equivalent of 3 years in direct sunlight for sensitive props. This can lead to significant discoloration and other cosmetic issues in the attraction.
          <3 Princess Schmidtty


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          • #6
            Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

            Everyone must take a common sense test before entry.


            http://www.amazon.com/Rent-A-Cops-ebook/dp/B00CGP2Y8S/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1367081996&sr=8-1&keywords=rentacops



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            • #7
              Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

              Tolerance for the imperfections of others. During my 23 Hours in the park on Leap day I was hobbled by a stroller, rode dark rides with people taking flash pictures, listed to overly loud people in the queues, and was subject to innumerable other petty behaviors. Yet I still had my best time ever in the park.
              "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it's time to pause and reflect."

              -Mark Twain

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              • #8
                Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                Let me add one more. Walk at a good pace. Folks walk ridiculously slow from attraction to attraction.

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                • #9
                  Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                  It all boils down to this: Have as much fun as possible without spoiling the fun for others.

                  (I think a lot of people here have forgotten about fun, which is pretty much the whole point, isn't it?)
                  "I really do have love to give. I just don't know where to put it."

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                  • #10
                    Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                    Dont stop in the middle of a busy walkway to have a family meeting!

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                    • #11
                      Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                      Keep your party together, especially when about to board transportation. I saw a lady get highly upset and was yelling at monorail cast members when they didn't hold the monorail for her family which was still more than half way down the ramp. Like any other mass transit system, they can't hold it - it has to go. Another monorail will pull in a few minutes later. Once you are able to board, board quickly and don't "shop" for the car where you will be the sole occupant.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                        You've all just illustrated one of the only problems with having a manual. Those of us who visit the parks and have these assorted pet peeves, generally show etiquette in the parks (and other public places for that matter) - people who already "get it" don't need the manual and the people that need the manual will not be moved from their bad behavior by it (or even read it for that matter). For some people, they only change their behavior when it causes them some sort of pain or nuisance to go on being a pain and a nuisance. For example, (and I am by no means suggesting that you do this) the person who walks into the 3D theater and stops halfway down the row, probably isn't going to move until it becomes so painful being stepped on by the 50 people who have to crawl over him that he is compelled to save his toes/legs and get up and move. Unfortunately, that forces everybody else to either stoop to his level or twist into the shape of a pretzel to get over him without being rude. I've actually stopped worrying about being rude to people with no manners to begin with - personally, I think you should be treated the way you act. I feel bad for the cast members who have to contend with that behavior.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                          Originally posted by PrincessSchmidtty View Post
                          One bright camera flash is the equivalent of 3 years in direct sunlight for sensitive props.
                          While of course I agree that people shouldn't be taking flash pictures of dark rides, the above statement is simply not true.

                          I just got back from Orlando, and I really had a hard time with people who would just stop wherever and regroup or check out maps or whatever. They especially seemed to do it when exiting a ride or so - standing there right in the flow of people, oblivious to the disruption they were causing.

                          As to the continuing to the end of the row, while on some shows this is important, I can understand why people don't. The idea that every seat has an equal view is again simply not true. A seat in the middle is far better than one way over on the side. But I don't see how someone can sit down in the middle when dozens of folks are right behind them looking for a seat. A much better solution is to stand for a while in the pre-show area, and then plan your entrance into the stream of people to where you'll get a great seat in the middle of the theater. I've become something of an expert in this - it doesn't always work, but usually I get a much better seat than I'd otherwise have without plopping down in the middle and forcing others to climb over me.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                            ORGOCH: One thing that bugs me 'bout goin' ta the park is a certain sister witch who don't have the good manners ta stop eatin' ev'rything in sight whilst leavin' a long line a crumbs, banana peels an paper plates behind like as if she was pretendin' ta be Hansel an' Grettle on her way ta eat another witch's house!!! Them folks that gotta clean up after the sorry excuse fer a witch sure got their work cut out fer 'em ev'ry time she comes inta Walt Dizzy Whirl!

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                            • #15
                              Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                              Originally posted by danyoung View Post
                              As to the continuing to the end of the row, while on some shows this is important, I can understand why people don't. The idea that every seat has an equal view is again simply not true. A seat in the middle is far better than one way over on the side. But I don't see how someone can sit down in the middle when dozens of folks are right behind them looking for a seat. A much better solution is to stand for a while in the pre-show area, and then plan your entrance into the stream of people to where you'll get a great seat in the middle of the theater. I've become something of an expert in this - it doesn't always work, but usually I get a much better seat than I'd otherwise have without plopping down in the middle and forcing others to climb over me.
                              True- planning your entrance into the ride would help you get the better seat, this only helps for people who know the way the theatre is set up. We do this all the time. A first time park goer won't know this, and when the doors open realize it is a large theatre and chose to sit in the middle. I agree, they should stand and let everyone else pass, but I also understand why they want the middle seat. The view is better. Sitting on the far left or far right isn't the best spot.

                              Originally posted by thedude76 View Post
                              Let me add one more. Walk at a good pace. Folks walk ridiculously slow from attraction to attraction.
                              why does a person have to run from one attraction to another? If someone is walking too slow, go around them. Little kids and elderly can't walk as quickly as you and you should respect that. Some people like to walk slow and take in the atmosphere. WDW is not all about the rides.

                              Originally posted by Moonliner View Post
                              Tolerance for the imperfections of others. During my 23 Hours in the park on Leap day I was hobbled by a stroller, rode dark rides with people taking flash pictures, listed to overly loud people in the queues, and was subject to innumerable other petty behaviors. Yet I still had my best time ever in the park.
                              Exactly. Have a great time.

                              Originally posted by proradvlx View Post
                              - .
                              - Movement of people: If you need to stop, for any reason, realize you are not the only persons in the park. Do not just stop in the middle of the walkways, please move off to the side.
                              I know this one is an irritant for a lot of people, but please understand that sometimes something happens and the person stops short and cannot move over right away. Example - shoe falls off.

                              I think ettiquette in the parks is important. People need to say please and thank you and unfortunately you don't hear it as often as you should. People should realize they are not the only people in the park and should respect others. Clean up after yourselves.
                              But I also think people need to be understanding and realize that although sometimes people do things that may irritate you, most are not doing it to irritate you. Sometimes it is what circumstances dictate. I have stopped in the middle of the walk ways, I have walked slowly through the park, I have been loud and I have also clipped people with my child's stroller. Sometimes these are not avoidable. People need to lighten up and not get aggrevated at everything.
                              Fratsor Sister - Delta Mu Chi Alpha

                              ΔΜΧΑ

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                              • #16
                                Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                                Swearing very loudly in the middle of a Disney park. Bugs the absolute &%$* out of me!!
                                "In many ways, the work of a critic is easy. We risk very little yet enjoy a position over those who offer up their work and their selves to our judgment. We thrive on negative criticism, which is fun to write and to read. But the bitter truth we critics must face, is that in the grand scheme of things, the average piece of junk is probably more meaningful than our criticism designating it so. But there are times when a critic truly risks something, and that is in the discovery and defense of the new. The world is often unkind to new talent, new creations, the new needs friends." - Anton Ego

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                                • #17
                                  Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                                  Originally posted by Mouse princess View Post
                                  ...why does a person have to run from one attraction to another? If someone is walking too slow, go around them.....I know this one is an irritant for a lot of people, but please understand that sometimes something happens and the person stops short and cannot move over right away. Example - shoe falls off.
                                  I think it's pretty evident if someone just has a malfunction that causes them to stop, like a shoe falling off. But those who exit a ride or show and just stop in the entryway and gather around a park map to see where they're going next - well, that just ain't cool!

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                                  • #18
                                    Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                                    I am going to get alot of negative feedback for this but... I really do not like that in WDW more than any other place small children crying on what they think are scary rides and shows ruin it for other guests. While at WDW I often heard children beg their parents to GO HOME.
                                    Imagine comming from the otherside of the planet to visit a Disneypark only to have the day ruined by parents that persist on taking infants or very small children on atractions that scare them or simply bore them. Everyone I have been with in the parks agrees with me on this. I know that this oppinion will not be popular in a forum like this but...

                                    - Leave the smallest most sensitive tired over stimulated hungry children outside the park/show with a familymember! I did not pay 200 dollars to hear your baby scream during the entire show!












                                    Last edited by TimmyTimmyTimmy; 03-09-2012, 03:55 PM.

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                                    • #19
                                      Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                                      Timmy, I see where you're coming from. Overall, I don't have a problem with kids crying in a Disney park. After all, this is a place that's NOTHING like what they're used to. And in many cases this is the first time a kid has been subjected to environments like this. So lotsa kids are gonna have a meltdown from time to time.

                                      The thing that really bothers me is parents who don't deal with the situation, who just think that if they ignore the tantrum long enough the child will calm down. Or even worse is the parent who will FORCE an attraction on a kid, when the kid is clearly letting the adult know that he/she is TERRIFIED of what they're being forced to do.

                                      When a kid is really kicking up a tantrum, you need to do one of two things - either find out what the kid wants and work out a way to give it to him/her, or let the child know that their behavior is unacceptable. I know as a child I had my moments of crying or freaking out. But I had great parents that let me know the limits - I wasn't allowed to fall down on the ground, or stomp, or just keep on screaming at the top of my lungs. Made me mad, oh yeah, when Dad would insist that we STOP IT RIGHT NOW!


                                      But o yeah, we stopped it.

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                                      • #20
                                        Re: Disney Park Etiquette Guide

                                        Parenting has a huge effect on how kids melt down, and yes they are going to melt down. Like Dan said, it's it over the top for a kid at the parks.

                                        Mine are 26 and 24 now, but the first time we took them was when they were 10 and 8. They knew what we expected of them, and as parents we knew what to expect. When they got tired we took them some place to relax, take a nap or just calm down. We didn't force anything on them, and they didn't blow up and cause a scene.

                                        As a parent it is up to you to control and teach your children. It's a 24 hour a day 7 day a week job with out any retirement. I still am a "parent" for my two boys even tho they are on their own. Some people don't seem to understand that and that is how we get some of the more "over the top" children and adults we have these days.

                                        For the most part, in all the trips I've had to the parks I can't remember many time I have been bothered by a child/parent scrap. Maybe knowing how it happens and being understanding about it makes me a bit more lenient I don't know. Again, it's all about etiquette, have you taught your kids some today?

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