Announcement

Collapse

Your Assistance Please

We need your help to battle spammers and also to keep our community user friendly.
PLEASE BE KIND TO OTHERS - Refrain from personal attacks. Avoid politics and harsh language whenever possible. If someone is violating our simple rules, DO NOT confront them, simply report the post.
STOP SPAMMERS - Report the post. DO NOT respond to them.

2017 is a year of renewal for us, we have lots of exciting changes on the way for you, but we don't have time to deal with trolls and spammers. If you find yourself suspended and need to plead your case, you will need to do so after your suspension. We are happy to address your concerns if you made a simple mistake. However, please note that those with a history of bad behavior and pushing our rules to the limit will not be given the courtesy of a reply.

MiceChat offers a number of ways for you to communicate and get involved. We offer Facebook Groups and Pages, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest accounts. We have a front page filled with amazing content. We offer weekly meetups in the parks. Meets and events all over the world. Podcasts and videos. And we continue to maintain forums for your posting convenience. But with all those options, we can't be everywhere all the time. We need YOUR help. Please don't poke the trolls. Report posts and leave reputation. We'll do our best to keep the forums clean and active, but we can't do so without your help.

Thank you for your support folks, it's going to be a really fantastic year in the MiceChat world.
See more
See less

Black rats, or Insects the size of lobsters?

Collapse

Ad Widget

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Black rats, or Insects the size of lobsters?

    I'd vote for the tree lobsters. Their story is quite endearing.

    One day in 1918, a supply ship, the S.S. Makambo from Britain, ran aground at Lord Howe Island and had to be evacuated. One passenger drowned. The rest were put ashore. It took nine days to repair the Makambo, and during that time, some black rats managed to get from the ship to the island, where they instantly discovered a delicious new rat food: giant stick insects. Two years later, the rats were everywhere and the tree lobsters were gone.

    Totally gone. After 1920, there wasn't a single sighting. By 1960, the Lord Howe stick insect, Dryococelus australis, was presumed extinct.
    Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years : Krulwich Wonders... : NPR

    On Lord Howe Island, their former habitat, the great-great-great-grandkids of those original black rats are still out and about, presumably hungry and still a problem. Step one, therefore, would be to mount an intensive (and expensive) rat annihilation program. Residents would, no doubt, be happy to go rat-free, but not every Lord Howe islander wants to make the neighborhood safe for gigantic, hard-shell crawling insects. So the Melbourne Museum is mulling over a public relations campaign to make these insects more ... well, adorable, or noble, or whatever it takes.


    They recently made a video, with strumming guitars, featuring a brand new baby emerging from its egg. The newborn is emerald green, squirmy and so long, it just keeps coming and coming from an impossibly small container. Will this soften the hearts of Lord Howe islanders? I dunno. It's so ... so ... big.


    But, hey, why don't you look for yourself?

Ad Widget

Collapse
Working...
X