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Remembering "The Day The Music Died"

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  • Remembering "The Day The Music Died"

    I thought it appropriate to point out that this is the anniversary of one of the more tragic events in American musical history...
    47 years ago now...February 3, 1959...as Don McLean later penned in his classic "American Pie", "The Day The Music Died.
    After a stop in Clear Lake, Iowa on the now infamous "Winter Dance Party" tour, some performers decided against taking their freezing tour bus and chartered a plane to their next stop in Moorhead, Minnesota.
    Among those killed in the ensuing plane crash were the great Buddy Holly, the "Big Bopper" and Southern California native Ritchie Valens.
    All three were tremendous musical talents, but Holly especially was a musical genius for his time.
    Among the ironies...Valens "won" his seat on the flight out of Mason City Airport by way of a coin-flip. As for the Big Bopper, he had developed a case of the flu on tour, erroneously thought to have been caused by riding on the unheated bus. The story goes that because of that, Bopper asked one of Buddy's bandmates...Waylon Jennings... to give up his seat on the plane.
    When Buddy heard about this...he told Waylon "I hope your old bus freezes up." To which Waylon replied, IN JEST, "Well, I hope your plane crashes".
    One can imagine how those words haunted Waylon over the years.
    BTW...Much of the song "American Pie" refers to that fateful day.
    "...Them good old boys were drinking whiskey and rye singin' this'll be the day that I die...this'll be the day that I die..."
    Last edited by Radiobarry; 02-03-2006, 08:57 PM.
    God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

  • #2
    Re: Remembering "The Day The Music Died"

    such an important day in the history of rock. I highly recommend the Buddy Holly Story and La Bamba as films about the artists and the tragedy. One can only imagine what each of them would have accomplished in their musical careers.

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    • #3
      Re: Remembering "The Day The Music Died"

      BDBopper - Considering you're such a fan of the Bopper you're the first person I thought of when I read this!

      Originally posted by Senator David Wu (D-OR)
      Don't let faux-klingons send real Americans to war!

      Originally posted by TheHousingBubbleBlog
      Everyone says that the U.S. doesnt make anything anymore, but thats not exactly true. Were the world leader in the manufacturing of bull****.

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      • #4
        Re: Remembering "The Day The Music Died"

        Originally posted by Anders
        such an important day in the history of rock. I highly recommend the Buddy Holly Story and La Bamba as films about the artists and the tragedy. One can only imagine what each of them would have accomplished in their musical careers.
        You may recall that Gary Busey received an Oscar Best Actor nomination in 1979. I liked the Buddy Holly movie better than "La Bamba" but that doesn't mean I don't respect Ritchie Valens. Did he not take part in some of the legendary concerts I've heard about at Legion Stadium in El Monte?
        Anyway, Buddy Holly says that it would never have happened without Elvis. But when you look at what the 20-ish kid from Lubbock, Texas did...with orchestrations and such...he was a genius in his own way. My favorite Buddy Holly tune...True Love Ways. If you've never heard it, find it - and get chills.
        God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

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