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  • RIP Bill Walsh (merged)

    Death had a busy day today

    Long time coach of the SF 49'ers Bill Walsh died today at 75

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...G57LR8OK21.DTL
    ďAny sequel three or higher..... around number five they get a new cast, thatís when the magic really happens": Modern Family

  • #2
    Re: RIP Bill Walsh

    Marquis d'Bod of the RCMC... always and forever

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    • #3
      Re: RIP Bill Walsh

      Thanks for the memories Bill!
      Originally posted by Grumpee
      I only care for Disney bling!

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      • #4
        Re: RIP Bill Walsh

        West coast offense was his baby.
        sigpic

        This has been a Filmways presentation dahling.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: RIP Bill Walsh

          Had the priviledge to meet coach Walsh at a 49ers training camp in 90 or 91. He was no longer coaching the team, but he was still a visible presence in the organization.

          Just seeing the way his players with names like Montana, Rice and Young looked up to the man was amazing.

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          • #6
            Re: RIP Bill Walsh

            Nice story on the 49ers website:

            http://www.sf49ers.com/

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            • #7
              Re: RIP Bill Walsh

              I'm saddened by this loss. He was one of the all time great coaches of one of the all time great teams.

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              • #8
                Re: RIP Bill Walsh

                My dad and grandfather were both high school football coaches and they thought that Bill Walsh was a total class act. His death makes my heart sad for his family.

                Comment


                • #9
                  RIP Bill Walsh

                  Sorry didn't see there was already a thread on this. Mods please merge this post.

                  SAN FRANCISCO (July 30, 2007) -- Bill Walsh, the groundbreaking football coach who won three Super Bowls and perfected the ingenious schemes that became known as the West Coast offense during a Hall of Fame career with the San Francisco 49ers, has died. He was 75.

                  Walsh died at his Woodside home following a long battle with leukemia, according to Stanford University, where he served as coach and athletic director.

                  "This is just a tremendous loss for all of us, especially to the Bay Area because of what he meant to the 49ers," said Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana, the player most closely linked to Walsh's tenure with the team. "For me personally, outside of my dad he was probably the most influential person in my life. I am going to miss him."

                  Walsh didn't become an NFL head coach until 47, and he spent just 10 seasons on the San Francisco sideline. But he left an indelible mark on the United States' most popular sport, building the once-woebegone 49ers into the most successful team of the 1980s with his innovative offensive strategies and teaching techniques.

                  The soft-spoken native Californian also produced a legion of coaching disciples that's still growing today. Many of his former assistants went on to lead their own teams, handing down Walsh's methods and schemes to dozens more coaches in a tree with innumerable branches.

                  Walsh went 102-63-1 with the 49ers, winning 10 of his 14 postseason games along with six division titles. He was named the NFL's coach of the year in 1981 and 1984.
                  Few men did more to shape the look of football into the 21st century. His cerebral nature and often-brilliant stratagems earned him the nickname "The Genius" well before his election to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1993.
                  Walsh twice served as the 49ers' general manager, and George Seifert led San Francisco to two more Super Bowl titles after Walsh left the sideline. Walsh also coached Stanford during two terms over five seasons.
                  Even a short list of Walsh's adherents is stunning. Seifert, Mike Holmgren, Dennis Green, Sam Wyche, Ray Rhodes and Bruce Coslet all became NFL head coaches after serving on Walsh's San Francisco staffs, and Tony Dungy played for him. Most of his former assistants passed on Walsh's structures and strategies to a new generation of coaches, including Mike Shanahan, Jon Gruden, Brian Billick, Andy Reid, Pete Carroll, Gary Kubiak, Steve Mariucci and Jeff Fisher.

                  Walsh created the Minority Coaching Fellowship program in 1987, helping minority coaches to get a foothold in a previously lily-white profession. Marvin Lewis and Tyrone Willingham are among the coaches who went through the program, later adopted as a league-wide initiative.

                  He also helped to establish the World League of American Football -- what was NFL Europe -- in 1994, taking the sport around the globe as a development ground for the NFL.

                  Walsh was diagnosed with leukemia in 2004 and underwent months of treatment and blood transfusions. He publicly disclosed his illness in November 2006, but appeared at a tribute for retired receiver Jerry Rice two weeks later.

                  While Walsh recuperated from a round of chemotherapy in late 2006, he received visits from former players and assistant coaches, as well as California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sen. Dianne Feinstein.

                  Born William Ernest Walsh on Nov. 30, 1931 in Los Angeles, he was a self-described "average" end and a sometime boxer at San Jose State in 1952-53.

                  Walsh, whose family moved to the Bay Area when he was a teen-ager, married his college sweetheart, Geri Nardini, in 1954 and started his coaching career at Washington High School in Fremont, leading the football and swim teams.

                  Walsh was coaching in Fremont when he interviewed for an assistant coaching position with Levy, who had just been hired as the head coach at California.

                  "I was very impressed, individually, by his knowledge, by his intelligence, by his personality and hired him," Levy said.

                  After Cal, he did a stint at Stanford before beginning his pro coaching career as an assistant with the AFL's Oakland Raiders in 1966, forging a friendship with Al Davis that endured through decades of rivalry. Walsh joined the Cincinnati Bengals in 1968 to work for legendary coach Paul Brown, who gradually gave complete control of the Bengals' offense to his assistant.

                  Walsh built a scheme based on the teachings of Davis, Brown and Sid Gillman -- and Walsh's own innovations, which included everything from short dropbacks and novel receiving routes to constant repetition of every play in practice.

                  Though it originated in Cincinnati, it became known many years later as the West Coast offense -- a name Walsh never liked or repeated, but which eventually grew to encompass his offensive philosophy and the many tweaks added by Holmgren, Shanahan and other coaches.

                  Much of the NFL eventually ran a version of the West Coast in the 1990s, with its fundamental belief that the passing game can set up an effective running attack, rather than the opposite conventional wisdom.

                  Walsh also is widely credited with inventing or popularizing many of the modern basics of coaching, from the laminated sheets of plays held by coaches on almost every sideline, to the practice of scripting the first 15 offensive plays of a game.

                  After a bitter falling-out with Brown in 1976, Walsh left for stints with the San Diego Chargers and Stanford before the 49ers chose him to rebuild the franchise in 1979.

                  The long-suffering 49ers went 2-14 before Walsh's arrival. They repeated the record in his first season. Walsh doubted his abilities to turn around such a miserable situation -- but earlier in 1979, the 49ers drafted quarterback Joe Montana from Notre Dame.

                  Walsh turned over the starting job to Montana in 1980, when the 49ers improved to 6-10 -- and improbably, San Francisco won its first championship in 1981, only two years after winning two games.

                  Championships followed in the postseasons of 1984 and 1988 as Walsh built a consistent winner and became an icon with his inventive offense and thinking-man's approach to the game. He also showed considerable acumen in personnel, adding Ronnie Lott, Charles Haley, Roger Craig and Rice to his rosters after he was named the 49ers' general manager in 1982 and the president in 1985.

                  Walsh left the 49ers with a profound case of burnout after his third Super Bowl victory in January 1989, though he later regretted not coaching longer.

                  He spent three years as a broadcaster with NBC before returning to Stanford for three seasons. He then took charge of the 49ers' front office in 1999, helping to rebuild the roster over three seasons. But Walsh gradually cut ties with the 49ers after his hand-picked successor as GM, Terry Donahue, took over in 2001.

                  He is survived by his wife, Geri, and two children, Craig and Elizabeth.

                  Walsh's son, Steve, an ABC News reporter, died of leukemia
                  This is a sad day for Niner Fans, the Bay Area, as well as football itself. Bill Walsh you will always be remembered and we'll never forget what you did for our team. The 49ers should honor Bill in some way, such as wearing throwback uniforms from the days he was still on our sidelines. If you agree, here is the petition: http://www.petitiononline.com/Walsh/petition.html

                  The faithful dedicate this next season to "The Genius" Bill Walsh. Thank you for giving the Niners this sense of tradition to San Francisco. You put us on the map and built our dynasty. Rest in paradise.
                  Last edited by TiggerGo; 07-30-2007, 07:41 PM.
                  "Difficult takes a day
                  Impossible takes a week"
                  - Jay-Z

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                  • #10
                    Re: RIP Bill Walsh

                    RIP to "The Genius" of football. This next season is for you.
                    "Difficult takes a day
                    Impossible takes a week"
                    - Jay-Z

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: RIP Bill Walsh (merged)

                      I never had the chance to really meet Bill Walsh, but I did get in a few post-game questions during the 49ers annual victories over the Rams in Anaheim during the 1980's.

                      You have to remember that during the 70's, the Rams were always "almost Super" while the 49ers were doormats.
                      Which made it all the more galling to Rams fans to see this coach team up with Joe Montana and company, and Ronnie Lott and that vastly underrated defense, and steamroller not only the Rams but the rest of the league after that.

                      Watching Montana and that new short pass "ball control" offense was like watching your favorite team being eaten alive by moths. Then came Jerry Rice and John Taylor and they could beat you with the long ball too.

                      Joe Montana never lost a game in Anaheim as the starting quarterback of the 49ers. Walsh lost there twice (once in 1980, just before the dynasty - and the other time in 85, when Montana was hurt).

                      Anyway, Walsh was a great innovator, and his "family tree" of coaches in beyond belief, starting with the guy who was the Niners PR director in '79 when he first took over - Brian Billick.

                      The NFL has lost one of its all time greats.

                      --Barry
                      God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: RIP Bill Walsh (merged)

                        When I first saw this thread title, I thought, "What the heck? Bill Walsh has been dead for over 30 years now!"

                        Being a Disney bulletin board, I thought this was about this Bill Walsh:

                        http://legends.disney.go.com/legends...key=Bill+Walsh

                        Then when I opened the thread and read it...very sad news.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: RIP Bill Walsh (merged)

                          Originally posted by Opus1guy View Post
                          When I first saw this thread title, I thought, "What the heck? Bill Walsh has been dead for over 30 years now!"

                          Being a Disney bulletin board, I thought this was about this Bill Walsh:

                          http://legends.disney.go.com/legends...key=Bill+Walsh

                          Then when I opened the thread and read it...very sad news.
                          I thought the very same thing, Opus1guy.... :blush:

                          For a minute, I thought he might have meant Bill Welsh, but Welsh died in 2000, at age 86. Then I remembered that I often got Bill Welsh mixed up with Ralph Story, so I looked Story up, but then I found out that he'd died too, last year, also at age 86.



                          But, hearing of the passing of this Bill Walsh is also sad.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: RIP Bill Walsh (merged)

                            What a shame. Bill Walsh will stand as one of the greatest NFL coaches of all time. He will definitely be missed.
                            Originally posted by aashee
                            We are 100% grade A Disney Dorks.

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                            • #15
                              Re: RIP Bill Walsh (merged)

                              Originally posted by TiaDalmaFan View Post
                              For a minute, I thought he might have meant Bill Welsh, but Welsh died in 2000, at age 86. Then I remembered that I often got Bill Welsh mixed up with Ralph Story, so I looked Story up, but then I found out that he'd died too, last year, also at age 86.
                              OFF TOPIC - Just for the sake of those that don't know, the men referred to here are both longtime Los Angeles local TV personalities. Welsh worked for KTTV Ch. 11 for many years. He did everything from Dodger pre-game shows back in the day, to hosting the Santa Claus Lane Parade.

                              Ralph Story worked at the old KNXT-Ch.2 (now KCBS), hosted "AM Los Angeles" with Stephanie Edwards back in the 70's on KABC-TV Ch.7, and more recently did a lot of work for KCET Ch. 28 - a lot of LA retrospective type stuff.

                              Just so ya know.

                              --Barry
                              God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

                              Comment

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