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Canadian psychiatrists decend upon the 100 Acre Wood

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  • Canadian psychiatrists decend upon the 100 Acre Wood

    Here's something fun I read in the Wall Street Journal today.
    Mental-health students even explore children's literature for buried psychological themes. Analysts have had a field day in the "Hundred Acre Wood" with A.A. Milne's characters. While the world of Winnie the Pooh seems innocent on the surface, "it is clear to our group of modern neuro-developmentalists that these are in fact stories of seriously troubled individuals, many of whom meet DSM-IV criteria for significant disorders," wrote Sarah E. Shea and colleagues in the Canadian Medical Association Journal in 2000, referring to the handbook of diagnoses.

    Piglet clearly suffers from generalized anxiety disorder, the authors noted. Eeyore has chronic dysthymia (mild depression) and could benefit greatly from an antidepressant. Tigger is hyperactive, impulsive and a risk-taker.

    Pooh is a bundle of comorbidities that may include cognitive impairment, as he is often described as a "bear of very little brain." "Early on, we see Pooh being dragged downstairs bump, bump, bump, on the back of his head," the authors write. "Could his later cognitive struggle be the result of a type of Shaken Bear Syndrome?"
    (to see other diagnoses of fictional characters like Indiana Jones, Harry Potter, and the characters from 'Twilight', go to Fictional Stars, Real Problems - WSJ.com ).

    Let's have some fun. Name some other characters and what types of psychiatric problems you think they have.
    Growing older is manditory
    Growing up is however, optional

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