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Mercedes C-Class found in 'National Treasure: Book of Secrets'

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  • Mercedes C-Class found in 'National Treasure: Book of Secrets'

    Mercedes Aims C-Class at First-Time Buyers

    August 29, 2007
    By Andrew McMains
    Adweek

    NEW YORK -- Mercedes-Benz USA's new campaign for the 2008 C-Class plays up the model's engineering, safety features, design and luxury amenities.



    One 60-second spot, from Omnicom Group's Merkley + Partners here, features a 40ish man talking on and off camera about the rigorous tests that each C-Class undergoes, be it for braking quickness, suspension stability or door-hinge strength. As he talks, each test is illustrated. One frame, for example, shows four male engineers sitting on the sills of the car's four open doors.

    After ticking off the litany of tests, the man says, "Why? Because we promised you a Mercedes-Benz. That's why."

    By focusing on performance, Mercedes aims to show potential buyers that its entry-level offering, at a starting price of $31,975, is as solid and dependable as its most expensive models, according to Steve Cannon, vp-marketing at MBUSA. "It all comes back to product," said Cannon. "This isn't a shared platform. This is a Mercedes-Benz."

    One version of the new C-Class has been redesigned to look more "sporty," with, for example, the Mercedes mark incorporated into the face of the front end but no hood ornament. And that version—which Mercedes hopes will appeal in particular to first-time buyers—appears in most of the new ads.

    Besides two TV executions, which break Sept. 10, the campaign includes radio, print, outdoor, direct mail, Internet banners, a microsite, test-drive events and product placement in the upcoming Walt Disney Pictures' film, National Treasure: Book of Secrets.

    "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

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