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  • Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

    Strike still on, according to WGA email

    Nov 4, 2007, 09:36 PM |
    by Lynette Rice
    Entertainment Weekly


    Though optimistic rumors were circulating through Hollywood that an 11th-hour negotiation session that began Sunday morning between the writers and producers was looking promising, WGA West President Patric Verrone sent out an email early Sunday afternoon to members obtained exclusively by the Hollywood Insider saying that the strike is still on for Monday morning and that everyone should contribute 20 hours a week to the effort. In the email, Verrone promises that many writers, from showrunners and A-list screenwriters to first-time scribes, will be walking the picket line for a strike that he hopes will only go on for a short period of time.


    The WGA announced Friday that the strike would officially begin at 12 a.m. Monday morning. Picketing shifts and various picketing locales are listed on the guild's website, including CBS and Fox in Los Angeles, the Sony lot in Culver City, and NBC and Disney in Burbank. According to the site, picketing will begin at 9 a.m. and end at 5 p.m.
    http://hollywoodinsider.ew.com/2007/...-still-on.html
    "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

  • #2
    Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

    Hopefully the strike won't go on too long.

    Although, may be a good time to get some new blood (and better writing) out there for both TV and movies.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

      I posted this on the Debate lounge because I know there's some people who are going to think it's not okay for them to be on strike. But that said, I am okay with this. I am for the writers. I am sorry but they should get paid for internet sales. Furthermore look at how insane it costs to buy a season of say "The Office," $33 and the writers are only make 4 cents of that? The one big fear I have is this could trickle into higher movie, DVDs, and overall entertainment prices. Movies are so expensive right now that... I just I would rather at this point in my life rent a DVD for $2.50, see it in my own home and relax, than pay $10.50 for a movie where some jerk brought their 2 month old who will scream the whole time (happened during "Superman Returns") or someone to kick my chair the whole time. If they go up higher for a theater seat. Dude.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

        Daily updates can be found here:

        STRIKE ZONE:
        http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/...fc3a4160ca133a

        WGA Writers Strike:
        http://www.variety.com/index.asp?lay...ttopic&id=2821
        "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

          Saw strikers today at Sunset Gower and Paramount, so sad.

          WGA strike could go into 2008

          Both sides dig heels into the ground

          By Dave McNary
          Variety
          November 6, 2007

          Hopes for a quick resolution of the writers strike are fading fast.

          Back-channel efforts have resumed to avert what's now looking like a long and painful work stoppage. But those moves aren't gaining much traction amid continued hardline public stances by both the WGA and the Alliance of Motion Picture & Television Producers.

          Worries have risen that without reviving the WGA talks, the scribes' work stoppage could easily bleed into the middle of next year. The DGA's expected to launch talks within the next few weeks while SAG's negotiations would probably start in the late winter or early spring. Both the DGA and SAG contracts expire June 30.
          http://www.variety.com/article/VR111...ryid=2821&cs=1
          "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

            Being a former member of the WGA, I support the writers 1000%.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

              Eisner calls writers strike "insanity"

              By Mimi Turner
              The Hollywood Reporter
              Nov 8, 2007

              NEW YORK -- Former Disney chairman and CEO Michael Eisner dismissed the Hollywood writers strike as "insanity" and "too stupid," warning writers that they were sacrificing real income for a hope of revenue that studios did not yet have.

              Speaking Wednesday morning at the Dow Jones/Nielsen Media and Money conference, Eisner said writers had been premature in pressing for digital revenue when the model was still unproven, and should have postponed action for at least three years.

              "For a writer to give up today's money for a nonexistent piece of the future -- they should do it in three years, shouldn't be doing it now -- they are misguided they should not have gone on the strike. I've seen stupid strikes, I've seen less stupid strikes, and this strike is just a stupid strike."

              The former Disney boss, now founder of the Tornante Co., suggested that studios had embarked on a "harlot's parade" over the past few years when they had talked up the potential of digital revenues to a point when they could not back down.

              Writers, he said, were striking for a piece of "a nonexistent (revenue) flow."

              "Studios are there because they have to be there. They don't want to be in the transportation business and telling people they should be in the train business -- god forbid they should miss yet another track," Eisner said.

              Eisner indicated that currently only content aggregators such as Apple were generating income from the digital boom.

              "The only real winner here is Steve Jobs. They should be striking up at Cupertino or wherever he is," he said.

              Eisner said the studios had been involved in creating a storm of "rhetoric" over something that would eventually be the major avenue of content distribution, but was not there yet.

              "I don't want to be critical of (studio) people because I would have been in the middle of making mistakes. Digital will eventually be the dominant medium for distribution but not yet," he said.

              Eisner said that the current financial pain within the subprime and mortgage markets could go on for as long as two years.

              "It will be a year or two and there will be a lot of pain -- we have resetting of rates -- banks maybe have to go back to their original businesses and not be taking fees and handing off to packagers in this whole process of financial musical chairs."
              http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/...9400ef8049157e
              "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                the writers aren't stupid. the future for movie sales isn't in dvd's it's digital downloads. I am however torn on this aspect. I believe that when you work on a project you get paid for your work at the time you do it . If you are a good enough writer, actor, director, etc to command a piece of the rest of the sales, that should be negotiated into your contract. It seems funny how supporting people get one salary like the lighting people and cameramen and makeup people. You don't see these people going on strike for a bigger piece of sales. just my opinion of course

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                  ^ I disagree. The future of TV is digital downloads, at least until most channels are in HD. The future of DVD's is not in downloads because the movie industry keeps adapting to new technologies.

                  And just becuase it's Eisner, doesn't mean we should discount it. He knows the industry. And I think he's right.

                  What if the writers get what they want for downloads? Then the Digital Download boom becomes even more lucrative. What do they do? Strike again?

                  What if Digital Downloads stop? What happens? They have striked for nothing.

                  It's stupid.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                    Showrunners picket Disney

                    By Leslie Simmons
                    The Hollywood Reporter
                    Nov 8, 2007

                    More than 125 striking showrunners from shows including "Ugly Betty," "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" and "Lost" turned up at the gates of Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, demanding a fair deal from the studios.

                    "Every day the producers don't give us a fair and decent deal is a wasted day in Hollywood," "Ugly Betty" creator and executive producer Silvio Horta said.

                    Wearing a T-shirt reading "Wasted Days" written in the famous Disney font, Horta and fellow "Betty" executive producer Marco Pennette said it was important for all showrunners to get together and be seen publicly supporting the strike.

                    "For the sake of the show, we worked on the scripts up to the deadline," Pennette said. "And for the sake of the actors, they can shoot something. But we chose to not cross the line."

                    Among the showrunners: "SVU's" Neal Baer, "Entourage's" Doug Ellin, Carlton Cuse of "Lost," veteran producer John Wells ("ER," "I'm Not There"), "Desperate Housewives' " Marc Cherry and Shaun Cassidy, who said he has several pilots he's working on at Disney that are now in "development freeze."

                    "Today is very much about showing solidarity among showrunners," said Cherry.

                    As more shows begin to close up shop, Cherry said he expects to see more SAG members turn out at the picket lines. Next week, Cherry said, there will be special pickets featuring actors, and on Friday, the "entire guild membership" is supposed to show up at 20th Century Fox studios.

                    Following the march, the showrunners gathered at the Smoke House Restaurant in Burbank for a lunch that was paid for by talent agency Paradigm, which represents such top showrunners as Cherry and Baer, both members of the WGA negotiating committee.

                    Despite that goodwill gesture, eyewitness reported that discussions between negotiation moderates and more militantly inclined scribes escalated into a heated debate over the guild's bargaining strategy as well as the spectrum of producing duties showrunners could perform during a strike. No punches were thrown, though the verbal barbs were said to be sharp and unusually multisyllabic. According to sources, the debate later moved to the WGA headquarters in Los Angeles.
                    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/...ca082156068364
                    "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                      im pretty sure no one cares what eisner says
                      Marquis d'Bod of the RCMC... always and forever

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                        Originally posted by Master Gracie View Post
                        im pretty sure no one cares what eisner says
                        You don't pay over $2,000 to attend an event just to completely discount everything that one of the keynote speakers has to share.
                        http://www.mediaandmoneyconference.c...spx?pageid=447
                        "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                          I think the writers are being greedy.
                          Har har har

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                            I support these writers and their beliefs. Goo guys.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                              Originally posted by rex22 View Post
                              I support these writers and their beliefs. Goo guys.

                              How could you support them. After they want more money, and them starting a strike caused NBC to fire 102 people on 1 show alone, Because they have nothing to do. Due to the writers being on strike.
                              Last edited by garbear; 11-11-2007, 04:28 AM.
                              Har har har

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                                I thought this blog was a great explanation for the strike. http://www.triggerstreet.com/gyrobas...=oid%3A1237593
                                A Writer's Blog: From the Picket Lines, Day 5 - "Why We Strike"

                                Posted November 9, 2007 by A.E. Vogler
                                Categories: TriggerStreetTV, WGA Strike

                                I've been asked this week. Why are we striking? The answer is slightly complicated, and I hope you'll bear with me.

                                There are many issues on the table in this negotiation, but one towers above all others, the sticking point that cannot be unstuck: Residuals in New Media.

                                When a writer is hired to pen a script for a studio, we get a fee. The studio then owns copyright on every word we scribble. They're effectively purchasing our work as we create it. If a script goes into production, when the movie or television show comes out on DVD, we get what's called residuals. Every time a DVD is sold featuring material based on our work, we get an additional payment of four cents. Not a great deal of money. But it can add up.

                                Just as DVD supplanted VHS a decade ago, the Internet is now set to supplant DVD. So instead of popping in that DVD of PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN, you'll click your mouse and download it straight to your TV. This delivery format is referred to as "New Media." And the studios don't want to pay residuals on it.

                                Shouted from a moving vehicle on yesterday's picket:

                                Quit whining. You guys are all overpaid!

                                It's true that some of us earn over $200,000 a year. I do. But it took me 13 years of sc by on less than $18,000 a year to get to this point. Average all that out and you get $32,000 annually over the 13 year span. And I'm one of the lucky ones. Most working writers earn less than $50,000 per year at their peak. And half of the guild membership is out of work entirely.

                                Now factor this in. It's possible that in the future, I might not work at at all. In fact, the hard truth is that most writers won't. My income then drops to zero. Only now I'm in my 40's, with a family to support. In this grim scenario, there is one thing and one thing only that saves me from having to sell star maps on Sunset Boulevard: residuals from the years when I was working. By that point, New Media will be the only media.

                                If there are no residuals on New Media, star maps it is.

                                That's why we're striking.

                                Read on a message board today:

                                When millionaires are protesting billionaires, it's hard for me to get worked up.

                                The richest members of the Writers Guild are raking in enough bucks to be comfortable for the rest of their lives. They could care less about the 4 cents. This isn't about them. It's about the 11,000 plus other members of the Guild who are middle, or even working class. John August, Paul Haggis and Marc Cherry are striking for the majority of their guild who are less fortunate than they. They are, in fact, giving up millions of dollars in fees to do this. Not for themselves.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                                  Studios: What to shoot amid strike?

                                  Bond, 'Da Vinci,' 'X-Files' on the bubble

                                  By Anne Thompson, Tatiana Siegel
                                  Variety
                                  November 8, 2007

                                  Studios that scrambled to stockpile scripts in advance of the writers strike are now forced into a Darwinian dilemma: They must pick the fittest projects, and perhaps scuttle the rest.

                                  For the most part, they are prepared to shoot their locked and cast projects that start within the next month or so, meaning there will be little impact on the 2008 schedule.

                                  But if the strike goes on past the New Year, things start to look a bit more dicey. Every production chief faces the anxiety-filled challenge of actually proceeding with greenlit projects that will shoot under unprecedented duress, and "bubble" projects that have solid scripts but incomplete casting.

                                  An estimated 50 or so projects across studios are at the "go" stage, among them the next James Bond movie, "The Da Vinci Code" prequel "Angels & Demons" and "The X Files" sequel, rumored to be titled "Done One."
                                  Disney's June start on Jerry Bruckheimer's "Prince of Persia," too, could get into trouble.

                                  "We'll do everything we can do to make the movies as good as they can be," says Disney production prexy Oren Aviv. "But the reality is, we wouldn't be moving forward with the movies we're greenlighting if I didn't have confidence in the scripts we have."

                                  Most of the studios say they are good to go with pics that are locked, cast and prepped, and starting to shoot between December and February.

                                  Disney, for example, isn't worried about the $80 million FX-heavy "Bedtime Stories," because Adam Sandler is adept at working on his feet. Similarly, Par Vantage is going forward this month with its Will Ferrell/Adam Mckay produced used-car salesmen comedy "The Goods," starring a cast led by Jeremy Piven. "They can improvise," one producer says.

                                  But many execs concur that it's going to be tough to find top-flight comic talent for still-uncast comedies. Everybody's working. And 2009 could become problematic if the strike causes too many pics to stall.

                                  "If the strike doesn't end, we won't make our dates," one studio production chief says.

                                  Fox is moving full speed ahead with its "X-Men" spinoff "Wolverine," even though many roles are still uncast. Unlike "X-Men," "Wolverine" rests solidly on Hugh Jackman's shoulders.

                                  On "X-Men" pics, Parker admits, writers Simon Kinberg and Zak Penn were making adjustments throughout production. "Wolverine" will have no such luxury. Most action sequences will be handled in f/x animation.

                                  "The X-Files" sequel, while casting supporting roles, is to start in December, Parker says. Pulling the plug now would be prohibitively expensive.
                                  http://www.variety.com/article/VR111...ryid=2821&cs=1
                                  "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                                    oh man being a writer is not an easy job I mean you start the low level income and you wait for years to earn good hard money wow.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                                      Diller dig

                                      Barry Diller echoed the words of his former protege, Michael Eisner, by calling the writers strike "stupid." "Both sides must have really mishandled this one," Diller told Fox Business Network's Neil Cavuto on Monday. "In order to have gotten to 'strike moment,' everyone must have screwed up, which makes it difficult to get them back to some sort of sanity."

                                      The 65-year-old former CEO of Paramount and Fox added there is no revenue from digital content right now. "It's a fixture that no one can figure out," he said. Both sides should have agreed to monitor the next five years to see where all of the revenue is coming from, and freeze that area until they understand the revenue stream, he added.
                                      http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/...fc3a4160ca133a
                                      "If you don't know how to draw, you don't belong in this building" - John Lasseter 2006

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Re: Strike still on, according to WGA e-mail

                                        Writers, studios remain in stalemate
                                        By David B. Wilkerson, MarketWatch

                                        CHICAGO (MarketWatch) -- After a full week, striking movie and television writers and their employers have no immediate plans to return to the bargaining table, spokespersons for both sides said Monday.

                                        No new talks have been scheduled, Writers Guild of America East representative Sherry Goldman and Alliance for Motion Picture & Television Producers spokesman Jesse Hiestand said.
                                        Several primetime shows have also halted production, including ABC's comedic soap opera "Desperate Housewives," Fox's sitcoms "Back to You" and "Til Death," and the CBS comedies "Rules of Engagement," "The New Adventures of Old Christine," "The Big Bang Theory" and "Two and a Half Men," according to published reports.
                                        Source: MarketWatch
                                        Last edited by disneytim; 11-12-2007, 09:27 PM.
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